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Biology Course Offerings

A listing of offered courses follows with prerequisites.  Please note that some courses do have additional fees associated with them.  The credit value of each course is represented by the number in brackets.

Undergraduate Course Offerings

Graduate Course Offerings


Undergraduate Courses


BIO 110, 111 General Biology [4, 4]

BIO 110 considers the following topics in a broad, general survey for the non-major: the cellular nature and energy requirements of plants and animals; evolution; genetics; species interaction; ecology. BIO 111 emphasizes the relationship between structure and function of all the systems of the human body. The laboratory is correlated with the lecture. Credit toward a biology major or minor by permission only. Laboratory fee.

BIO 122, 123 Biological Science [4, 4]

An introduction to plant and animal biology that focuses on four specific aspects of evolution—biochemical, physiological, cytological, and ecological—presented during two semesters. Each area is presented through small- group, intensive laboratory units employing modern research techniques. Formal lectures unify laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: Minimum of one year of high school chemistry. Corequisite: Either CH 110 and 111, or CH 114 and 136. Laboratory fee.

BIO 190, 195 Special Studies in Biology [4, 4]

An exploration of various topics in biology selected to emphasize science as a way of knowing. Laboratory fee.

BIO 210/PSY 210 Physiological Psychology [3]

This course is an introduction to the physiological bases of behavior in normal psychological functioning. Topics include neuron structure and function, functional neuroanatomy, drugs and behavior, and the physiology of hunger, sex, sleep, emotion, reward / punishment, language, and learning and memory.
Prerequisites:
PSY 101 or 102, and BIO 110 or 111.

BIO 212, 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology [4, 4]

A study of human tissues and organ systems. BIO 212: muscular, skeletal, nervous, and endocrine systems; skin and special senses. BIO 213: circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems; blood and metabolism. Laboratory dissection and physiology experimentation are coordinated with lecture material. This course is for health science students and it is recommended that they be taken in order. Prerequisites or corequisites: CH 114 and 136, or CH 110-111. Laboratory fee.

BIO 260W Ecology [4]

Introduction to the study of ecosystems, including physical, chemical, and biological components. Emphasis on bioenergetics, succession, distribution of organisms, population dynamics, and speciation. Laboratory studies include use of the major techniques of field and laboratory research in ecology. Prerequisites: BIO 122 and BIO 123, or equivalent. (Writing-intensive course)

BIO 272W Genetics [3]

A study of the gene, its structure, control, and role in determining the chemical and physical characteristics of cells and individuals. Analysis of Mendelian ratios and chromosome maps. Prerequisites: CH 230, or CH 114 and 136. (Writing-intensive course)

BIO 273W Genetics Laboratory [1]

Topics include simple statistical analysis of data derived from crossing fruit flies or other organisms, cell hybridization, extraction of plasmids from bacteria, transformation and induction of mutations in bacteria. Corequisite: BIO 272W. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

BIO 336 Comparative Animal Physiology [4]

Basic physiological processes of animals are presented. Topics include nervous systems, muscle function, circulation of blood, respiration, osmoregulation, and excretion. Laboratory investigations extend the lecture presentation. Prerequisites: CH 230-231; or CH 114 and 136; or at least 16 credits in biology, including BIO 352. Laboratory fee.

BIO 337W Immunology [3]

A detailed study of the cellular and humoral components of the immune system. The course surveys immunochemical methods and current theories of immunity. Topics include humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, cellular cooperation, hypersensitivity, transplantation, and cancer immunology. A series of immunochemical laboratory exercises reinforces basic concepts. Prerequisites: CH 230-231; or CH 114 and 136; or at least 16 credits in biology, including BIO 352. (Writing-intensive course)

BIO 338 Immunology Laboratory [1]

The laboratory course provides the students with a survey of the major types of immunochemical methods and includes the development and evaluation of an antisera. Prerequisite or corequisite: Course in immunology or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

BIO 352 Cell Biology [4]

Detailed study of the structural and functional components of the cell, understood in terms of the molecular building blocks for each cellular component. Major concepts include evolution, chromosome structure, the cytoskeleton, membrane transport, the generation of cellular energy, vesicle trafficking, and cell cycle regulation. The laboratory makes extensive use of microscopy of live and fixed specimens, and includes some molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIO 122, or BIO 212 and BIO 213, depending on the major; and BIO 272W; and BIO 273W. Laboratory fee.

BIO 380 Plant Propagation [4]

A theoretical and practical course investigating the techniques of seedage, cuttage, grafting, and budding. Principles governing the identification, propagation, and growth of annuals, biennials, and perennials cultured under greenhouse or indoor conditions are considered. Prerequisite: 8 credits of biology. Laboratory fee.

BIO 382 Honors Seminar in Biology [.5]

This seminar reviews literature of one topic of current interest in biology, critically analyzing research papers and discussing the contribution of that research to the overall understanding of a particular problem in biology. Prerequisite: Admission through departmental approval to the Honors program.

BIO 401, 402, 403, 404 Biology Internship [3, 6, 9, 12]

The Department of Biology maintains a number of affiliations with agencies able to offer students a perspective-broadening internship experience that provides an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts, to develop expertise in fields outside faculty research interests, to broaden professional contacts and explore career goals. This off-campus activity is under close faculty supervision and requires related reading and writing assignments. Students may not accumulate more than 15 credits of internship in biology. Prerequisite: A minimum of six courses in biology that are applicable toward the major. Specific courses may be required for particular internship experiences. An overall GPA of 2.7 is required for consideration into the program.

BIO 420 Comparative Anatomy [4]

A detailed study of vertebrate anatomy emphasizing adaptive evolutionary structures. Laboratory work includes dissection of selected chordates to demonstrate these structures. Prerequisite: BIO 123. Laboratory fee.

BIO 440 Medical Microbiology [4]

Host-parasite relationships of representative bacterial, fungal, viral, and protozoan pathogens are examined. An organ-system approach is used to survey pathogens, and this is correlated with laboratory materials. An introduction to immunology as a host defense mechanism and a diagnostic tool is included. Prerequisites: CH 110-111; or CH 114 and 136; and at least 12 credits in biology, including BIO 272W and BIO 273W. Laboratory fee.

BIO 442 Microbiology [4]

The morphology, physiology, and genetics of microorganisms are examined. Experiences in the laboratory include sterile techniques, culture methods, identification procedures, and quantitative analysis of bacteria. Prerequisites: CH 110-111; or CH 114 and 136; and at least 12 credits in biology, including BIO 272W and BIO 273W. Laboratory fee.

BIO 444/CH 444 Biochemistry [3]

This is a survey of cell chemistry, including energy generation, enzymology, biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, and the control of metabolism. Quantitative problems in biochemistry are given. Prerequisites: CH 230-231, or CH 114 and 136, and at least 16 credits in biology; chemistry majors: CH 230-231 and at least 16 credits in chemistry, with 8 credits of biology or equivalent recommended.

BIO 445 Biochemistry Laboratory [2]

Biochemical techniques, including quantitative analysis, radioisotopes, chromatography, centrifugation, and enzyme purification and assays are presented in laboratory experiments. Corequisite: BIO 444 or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

BIO 471 Recombinant DNA Biology [4]

This course covers the theory, development, and practice of basic technologies used in recombinant DNA studies. It provides laboratory experiences with vector DNA isolation, hybrid plasmid formation, restriction mapping, clone selection, and gene expression. Recombinant DNA technologies in basic and applied biological sciences are discussed. Prerequisites: BIO 352, BIO 272W, BIO 273W, and CH 110-111 or CH 114. Laboratory fee.

BIO 482, 483 Honors Research in Biology [3]

These courses involve original, independent research in the biological sciences under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. Completion of them requires the submission of a written thesis and oral presentation of results. No more than 3 credits may be taken in any one semester, and no more than 3 credits may be taken during the junior year. Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors program and junior standing.

BIO 493 Special Problems [1–4]

Independent study/research in a field of special interest under faculty supervision. Registration requires the signature of the sponsoring faculty member. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Laboratory fee.

BIO 495, 496, 497, 498 Special Studies in Biology [3, 3, 4, 4]

An exploration in depth of a modern topic in biological sciences. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Laboratory fee for BIO 497 and 498 only.

Graduate Courses


BIO 500 Cooperative Education Program [variable]

Paid work experience in a biological industry under supervision of the biology faculty. Regular reports and the completion of goals set by a learning contract are required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BIO 518 Neuropharmacology [3]

Neuropharmacology explores the molecular mechanisms of action of drugs that modify nerve cell function and subsequently behavior. In addition to the fundamentals of pharmacology, emphasis is placed on the chemistry of the nerve cell and the techniques used to evaluate drug-induced changes in those cells. Selected neurotransmitter systems will be described in depth, and as time permits, the neurochemical basis for selected disease states such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and schizophrenia will be discussed. It is recommended that participants in this class have previous knowledge of physiological psychology or equivalent. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIO 520/PSY 571 Introduction to Neuroanatomy [3]

An overview of the mammalian nervous system with particular attention to the human central nervous system (CNS), structure, and function. Techniques available to study CNS structure/function relationships will also be reviewed. Prerequisites: One year of introductory biological sciences and graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

BIO 530 Neurogenetics [3]

This course introduces students to the branch of neuroscience that, more than any other, has undergone the most dramatic transition from bench research to clinical care over the past 10 years. A review of basic genetics is followed by exercises in differentiating genetic conditions from other disorders of the nervous system. The principles taught in BIO 520 are used to identify the specific anatomic levels affected by individual neurogenetic diseases. The challenges of genetic counseling and the prospects for gene therapy are critically examined. Prerequisites: BIO 520, BIO 538, and graduate standing; or permission of instructor.

BIO 532 Cell Physiology [3]

In-depth discussion of the activities of the cell and factors that influence these activities. Topics include transport of materials across membranes and from one cellular compartment to another, generation of biopotentials, cell movements, reproduction and respiration. Prerequisites: BIO 336 and graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

BIO 533 Experimental Cell Physiology [2]

Laboratory course in which some activities of the cell are subjected to experimental examination. Experiments include use of radioisotopes and electronic equipment to follow the transport of solutes across membranes, measurement of bioelectric potentials, growth of cells in culture, and effects of hormones on cell behavior. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 532 and graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

BIO 536 Animal Physiology [3]

A study of the mechanisms of action of the major physiological systems of the animal body. Emphasis is given to the circulatory, respiratory, renal, endocrine and reproductive systems. Prerequisites: BIO 336 and graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

BIO 538 Principles of Neurophysiology [4]

The fundamentals of neurophysiology are presented from the cellular to the systems levels. Preliminary discussion of the ionic and pharmacological bases of nerve and synaptic function serves as a foundation to subsequent discussion of the specialized neuronal geometries and synaptic circuitries associated with a variety of sensory, motor, and central systems. A laboratory accompanies the course and covers extracellular and intracellular techniques in electrophysiology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

BIO 540 Neuroethics [3]

This course provides a broad overview of the major theories and practice of neuroethics. Both clinical and research issues are addressed by asking students to reason through a series of decision-making scenarios. The concept of personhood, particularly as it relates to those with dementia, and the persistent vegetative state are emphasized. Whether neuroscience research should aim to make individuals "better" than normal, as opposed to remaining focused on the amelioration and reversal of disease, is discussed. Students also consider whether ethical decision making should allow room for intuition and spirituality or be governed primarily by a set of commonly accepted precepts. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

BIO 544 Biochemistry [3]

This is a survey of cell chemistry, including energy generation, enzymology, biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, and the control of metabolism. Quantitative problems in biochemistry are given. Graduate students will be required to complete an oral or written presentation of a special topic as designated by the instructor. Prerequisites: BIO 352 and CH 230-231, or permission of instructor.

BIO 545 Biochemistry Laboratory [2]

Biochemical techniques, including quantitative analysis, radioisotopes, chromatography, centrifugation, and enzyme purification and assays are presented in laboratory experiments. Graduate students will be required to complete a special and independent research project as designated by the instructor. Corequisite: BIO 544 or permission of instructor.

BIO 555 Vertebrate Histology [4]

Study of basic tissue classes and their interrelationships in organ anatomy with detailed study of prepared slides; emphasis on mammalian tissues. Prerequisites: BIO 352 and graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

BIO 576 Pathophysiology [4]

A study of the disease process from causation to pathogenesis. The first part of the course discusses topics in general pathology; the second provides an overview of systems pathology. The laboratory portion of the course concentrates on neuropathology and includes discussions and student presentations on selected neurological disorders, including the molecular basis of diseases in the nervous system. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

BIO 591, 592, 593, 594 Special Problems [1–4]

Individual research in a field of special interest under close faculty supervision. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and signature of faculty supervisor. Laboratory fee, if course is a laboratory course.

BIO 595, 596, 597, 598, 599 Special Topics [variable]

A graduate-level exploration of a modern topic in the biological sciences. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, if course is a laboratory course.

BIO 710 Topics in the Literature of Biology [3]

Survey of the current literature of biology to develop student skills in analysis and criticism stressing the interdependence of all areas of scientific inquiry. The course will include evaluation of students’ oral and written presentations.

BIO 742 Chemical Diagnosis of Disease [3]

A clinical pathophysiologic conference emphasizing analytical techniques, quality control, and pathogenesis of disorders that are primarily diagnosed and managed through clinical assays in the biochemistry laboratory. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

BIO 743 Advanced Topics in Medical Microbiology [3]

Current topics in identification and isolation of microorganisms implicated in disease, as encountered in the clinical laboratory. The course presents a clinical, pathological conference approach to emphasize and reinforce critical concepts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

BIO 744/PSY 633 Introduction to Clinical Neurology [3]

An introduction to the principles of the neurological examination and the major categories of neurologic disease. Topics include disorders of mobility, pain, and other disorders of somatic sensation; disorders of the special senses; disorders of consciousness; derangements of intellect, language, and behavior due to focal and diffuse cerebral disease; anxiety and disorders of energy and mood; abnormalities of growth and development of the nervous system; and the neurology of aging. Prerequisites: BIO 520 and graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

BIO 745 Clinical Neurology II [3]

This course continues the learning trajectory begun in BIO 744/PSY 633 Introduction to Neurology. As in the parent course, students are required to use the principles learned in BIO 520/PSY 571 Introduction to Neuroanatomy to solve a variety of clinical problems. The major areas of focus are movement disorders, pediatric neurology, and diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Additional topics include infections of the nervous system, chronic pain, dizziness-vertigo, and psychosomatic disease. The role of basic science in elucidating the nature of each of these disorders is emphasized. Prerequisites:  BIO 744/PSY 633 and graduate standing.

BIO 755 Neurologic Assessment [3]

An introduction to and review of those procedures, both invasive and noninvasive, that are diagnostic in evaluating a broad range of neurological syndromes. Prerequisites: BIO 520 and BIO 744.

BIO 790, 791 Thesis Research I, II [3, 3]

These courses are for the performance of thesis research and for writing the thesis as required in the master’s degree program in the Department of Biology. Prerequisite: 24 credits of approved graduate courses.

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