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History Course Offerings

A listing of offered courses follows with prerequisites.  The credit value of each course is represented by the number in brackets.

HIS 100, 101, 130, 131, 300 or 301, 341 or 342, 408 or 409 are offered every semester. Field designations in parentheses—(A), (E), or (AME)—following a course description indicate the course may be considered in the alternative field instead, with the proviso that a course may only be counted once for the major or minor and may only be counted in one field of concentration when credits are being totaled for graduation requirements.

General Course Offerings

American History Course Offerings

European History Course Offerings

History of Asia and the Middle East Course Offerings


General Courses


HIS 100 Civilization since 1500: Making the World Modern [3]

A study of the changing human experience with civilization during the formation of the modern world: the dynamics of economic, intellectual, political, and social modernization, and the dissolution of traditional civilization in the world. This course fulfills a general education requirement.

HIS 101 Civilization to 1650: Unfolding of Traditional Civilization [3]

A study of the unfolding of traditional civilization: the emergence of civilization in the ancient Near East, the definition and development of traditional civilization in Eurasia and elsewhere to 1650, as Europe began history’s first modernization. This course fulfills a general education requirement.

HIS 290, 291, 292, 390, 391, 490, 491 Special Topics in History [all 3]

Selected topics in history, varying from year to year in accordance with the needs of the curriculum and the availability of specialists in such topics.

HIS 300, 301 Independent Study in History [3, 3]

The preparation and criticism of a research project in areas of history of particular interest to a student, guided and directed by a faculty member. This gives the student an opportunity to develop and pursue his/her own interests in historical work and to gain experience in the techniques of historical research, writing, and criticism. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and permission of the department.

HIS 341, 342 Student Internship in History [1–4, 1–4]

Academically supervised work experience for qualified history majors in area facilities offering curatorial, archival, research, and museum activities. Prerequisites: Major or minor in history, 2.5+ GPA, and permission of the department.

HIS 408, 409 The Senior Thesis [3, 3]

Preparation of a senior thesis under the supervision of a departmental advisor and defense of the thesis before a departmental Thesis Committee. Prerequisites: At least 3 credits of HIS 300 or 301, and permission of the department.

American History (A)


130 The United States to the Civil War Era [3]

The first half of a two-part survey of American life since Columbus arrived in the New World, this course focuses on four principal topics: European colonization of the Americas, the development of the colonies and the road to the American Revolution, the origins and growth of African American slavery, and the coming of the Civil War. The course will emphasize broad themes and the experience of many different groups—farmers, servants, Indians, slaves, women—as well as the achievements of great leaders. Required for history majors. No prerequisite.

HIS 131 The United States since the Civil War Era [3]

The second half of a two-part survey of American life since Columbus arrived in the New World, this course focuses on five principal topics in American history since 1865: the rise of American industry and the development of American labor, world wars and America’s growing influence on world affairs, the impact of immigration, the birth and explosive growth of mass culture, the struggles to extend American democracy to excluded groups. The course will emphasize broad themes and the experiences of many different Americans as well as the achievements of great leaders. Required for history majors. No prerequisite.

222/GS 222 History of Women in America [3]

A survey of the changes in women’s work in the family and economy; the impact of immigration, urbanization, and industrialization; the significance of race, class, and ethnic differences among women; the changing cultural status of women; the development of organized women’s movements. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 130 or HIS 131, or permission of instructor.

HIS 224 History of Health and Disease [3]

A comprehensive overview of the history of health and disease and the evolution of the healing professions from antiquity to the present. Three distinct themes are developed: disease as a force of change, persistent and changing ideas about health and disease, and healing as science and craft. This course is designed for both students in history and those planning careers in the health professions. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of department chair. (E)

225/AFS 225 African American History [3]

An examination of the broad contours of the history of African Americans in the United States, with primary focus on the period from 1865 to the present. Topics include African American culture, resistance to slavery, black Americans and the military, civil rights, American apartheid, and African Americans and the United States political economy. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 130 or HIS 131, or permission of department chair.

HIS 228/JS 228/REL 228 American Jewish History [3]

The experience of American Jews from the Colonial period to the present, with the examination of their social, political, religious, and economic development. Episodes in the Jewish experience include the Colonial period, the early Republic, the Civil War, the eras of German and East European Jewish immigration to the United States, the Holocaust years, and the post–World War II era. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 130 or HIS 131.

HIS 232/REL 232/GS 232 European and American Witchcraft [3]

A history of the European and American attitudes toward witchcraft between the Middle Ages and the present. Special attention is paid to the “witchcraft mania” that emerged in the 15th century, to its regional variations, and to its slow subsidence in the late 17th century. The course also discusses the revival of witchcraft in the 20th century. Main currents of interpretation, both early modern and contemporary, are explored. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 130, or permission of instructor. (E)

HIS 233 U.S.-China Relations [3]

An interdisciplinary course analyzing the historical development of U.S.-China relations. The nature of their historical and contemporary views is studied as a reflection of cultural orientation. Their past economic relations are investigated and future relations anticipated. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or 130. (AME)

HIS 241W History as Detection: Workshop [3]

A workshop course employing the detective and interview methods in historical research, including artistic, popular, or interdisciplinary topics. Students prepare weekly problem/progress reports for grade and a 2,500-word paper. Class members serve as editorial assistants to each other and are guided by the instructor in the preparation of individual, possibly publishable, papers. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 101, or their equivalents. (Writing-intensive course)

HIS 261 U.S. Presidential Campaigns: Artifacts, Issues, Personalities [3]

Historical study of the presidential races and associated partisan campaigns. Emphasis is placed on critical elections since the colonial era. Participants have an opportunity to study original material in the University’s collection of presidential Americana. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 102 or HIS 130 or HIS 131.

HIS 354 The Experience of World War [3]

The 20th century has been called the “century of total war.” This course—dealing with the World Wars of the 20th century—attempts to explain what this means intellectually, politically, economically, ethically, and scientifically. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor. (E)

HIS 361 History of American Sports [3]

This course traces American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multibillion-dollar industries of today. We look at the beginnings of horse racing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the culture of the Victorian underworld. We follow baseball as it became the national pastime, see how college football took over higher education, and account for the rise of basketball. Finally, we study the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, and battles between players and owners. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 101 or HIS 130 or HIS 131.

HIS 362 The Experience of the American Revolution [3]

Through an examination of political, cultural, economic, and social developments in the American colonies, this course examines the origins, course, and consequences of the central event in 17th- and 18th-century North America: the American Revolution. Prerequisite: HIS 130 or permission of instructor.

HIS 363 Democracy, Reform, and Slavery: America from Washington to Lincoln [3]

This course deals with the period between the administration of George Washington and the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. During these years, the United States grew rapidly; experienced a religious awakening and a market revolution; established the legitimacy of its federal government; fought wars against Indians, Great Britain, and Mexico; expanded the democratic rights of white men; and thrived economically from the enslavement of millions of African Americans. Prerequisite: HIS 130 or permission of instructor.

364 The Experience of the American Civil War [3]

This course will examine the central event in American history: the Civil War. Rather than focus on the war as strategy, tactics, and battles, this course will treat the context and course of the war, its causes and consequences. Students will use documentary and secondary sources to understand how all Americans—slave and free, women and men, blacks and whites, Northerners and Southerners, combatants and civilians—experienced and struggled to understand our greatest and deadliest conflict. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 130, or permission of instructor.

HIS 365 The Creation of Industrial America [3]

This course examines the creation of modern industrial America between the end of Reconstruction and the end of World War I. During these years, the nation was transformed from a predominantly rural and agricultural country with few interests overseas into a victorious global and urban industrial power. A huge wave of immigrants and migrants had built and changed American cities; American labor and farmer radicalism had flowered and died; and a new mass culture was born. Prerequisite: HIS 131 or permission of instructor.

HIS 366 Twenties and Thirties America [3]

This course explores American society, culture, and politics between the end of World War I and the beginning of World War II. During this period, the United States experienced the flowering of a mass consumer culture, the rise of religious fundamentalism and corporate power, the greatest depression in the country’s history, an upsurge of labor and political radicalism, and the creation of the modern welfare state. Prerequisite: HIS 131 or permission of instructor.

HIS 367 The Experience of the War in Vietnam [3]

United States involvement in the Vietnam War, with reference to the origins of Vietnamese nationalism and communism, the Cold War roots of U.S. intervention, the escalation and decline of the U.S. role, the experience of the common soldier, the antiwar movement, the role of the media, and the war’s long-term social and political effects. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 131, or permission of instructor.

HIS 368/SOC 227 America in the 1960s [3]

An examination of the social and political developments in the United States from 1960 to 1974, including the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, the civil rights movement, the war on poverty, the origins of the counterculture, the revolution in the arts, the Vietnam War, the 1968 election and the crisis of liberalism, the Nixon administration, and Watergate. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 131, or permission of instructor.

HIS 463 Senior Seminar: Democracy, Reform, and Slavery: America from Washington to Lincoln [3]

This course deals with the period between the administration of George Washington and the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. During these years, the United States grew rapidly; experienced a religious awakening and a market revolution; established the legitimacy of its federal government; fought wars against Indians, Great Britain, and Mexico; expanded the democratic rights of white men; thrived economically from the enslavement of millions of African Americans; and built a myriad of reform movements. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and 130; or permission of instructor.

HIS 465 Senior Seminar: The Creation of Industrial America [3]

This capstone course for seniors concentrating in American history is an in-depth study of the creation of modern industrial America between the end of Reconstruction and the end of World War I. During these years, the nation was transformed from a predominantly rural and agricultural country with few interests overseas into a victorious global and urban industrial power. A huge wave of immigrants and migrants had built and changed American cities; American labor and farmer radicalism had flowered and died; and a new mass culture was born. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and 131; or permission of instructor.

HIS 466 Senior Seminar: Twenties and Thirties America [3]

This capstone course for seniors concentrating in American history is an in-depth study of American society, culture, and politics between the end of World War I and the beginning of World War II. During the 1920s and 1930s, the United States experienced the flowering of a mass consumer culture, the rise of religious fundamentalism and corporate power, the greatest depression in the country’s history, an upsurge of labor and political radicalism, and the creation of the modern welfare state. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and 131; or permission of instructor.

468 Senior Seminar: America in the 1960s [3]

This capstone course for seniors concentrating in American history is an in-depth study of American society, culture, and politics during the most turbulent decade since the end of World War II. The course focuses on African Americans’ struggle for civil rights and the growth of the Black Power movement; on the optimism and adventurousness of the Kennedy years; on the Vietnam War and the struggle to end it; on the birth of modern feminism; and on the growth of campus radicalism and the New Left. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and 131; or permission of instructor.


European History (E)


HIS 209 Civilization in the Ancient World [3]

The first transitions to civilization in the Tigris-Euphrates, Nile, Indus, and Huang-Ho valleys; the avenues of cultural interchange to the crystallization of the characteristic culture patterns of India, China, and the Near East. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of department chair. (AME)

HIS 210 Europe: Renaissance to Revolution [3]

An exploration of the cultural and constitutional trends in Europe from the Renaissance through the French Revolution, a period that saw enormous changes in political, social, economic and cultural life of Europe as new elements such as the Ottoman Empire appeared, new worlds were discovered, and a new science began to change age-old assumptions and beliefs. No prerequisite.

HIS 213 Europe: Napoleon to Gorbachev [3]

An examination of the development of modern Europe and exploration of its cultural and constitutional developments within political, economic, and social contexts. No prerequisite.

HIS 214/JS 214/REL 214 Jewish History from the Exile to the Enlightenment [3]

The development and diversity of Jewish life from the destruction of the Second Commonwealth to the French Revolution: the social and spiritual problems of dispersion; the evolution of Jewish society and culture in the Near East and Europe; the historical roots of anti-Semitism; the rise of the ghetto; and relations between the historical experience of the Jews and spiritual currents within their religion, such as Kabbala and Hasidism. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor. (AME)

HIS 215/JS 215/REL 215 Introduction to World Religions [3]

A historical study of major modern religions of the West (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and East (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto). This course also examines (1) the methodologies of religious studies, (2) the characteristics that religions share, and (3) the classic questions that religions address. No prerequisite. (AME)

HIS 216/JS 216/REL 216 Modern Jewish History [3]

The reciprocal effects of Jewish emancipation and Western history in the modern era, from the French Revolution to the present. Particular emphasis on the Zionist movement and the rise of the “Third Jewish Commonwealth,” the modern state of Israel, viewed both as products of post-Enlightenment nationalism and in their unique aspects. No prerequisite. (AME)

HIS 219 Modern Irish History [3]

The often violent history of modern Ireland has been a story of contested identity and suppressed nationalism in which even the meaning of “Irishness” itself was cause for conflict. This course examines the vital, controversial roles that religion, politics, economics, violence, ethnic identity, and imperialism have played in the course of Irish history. Students who have successfully completed HSB 210 Modern Ireland may not take HIS 219 for credit.

HIS 224 History of Health and Disease [3]

A comprehensive overview of the history of health and disease and the evolution of the healing professions from antiquity to the present. Three distinct themes are developed: disease as a force of change, persistent and changing ideas about health and disease, and healing as science and craft. This course is designed for both students in history and those planning careers in the health professions. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of department chair. (A)

229/JS 229/POL 209 The Holocaust [3]

Interdisciplinary lectures, readings, and discussions of the roots, details, and consequences of the Holocaust. Historical, intellectual, moral, political, legal, and psychological dimensions of the Holocaust as a phenomenon of its own and as an aspect of genocide. Prerequisite: HIS 100, or POL 105 or 106.

HIS 232/REL 232/GS 232 European and American Witchcraft [3]

A history of the European and American attitudes toward witchcraft between the Middle Ages and the present. Special attention is paid to the “witchcraft mania” that emerged in the 15th century, to its regional variations, and to its slow subsidence in the late 17th century. The course also discusses the revival of witchcraft in the 20th century. Main currents of interpretation, both early mod-ern and contemporary, are explored. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or HIS 130, or permission of instructor. (A)

HIS 350 The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Empire [3]

An examination of the experience of the world’s largest geographical region from the Russian Revolution to the collapse of the Soviet Union and beyond. Geographic, economic, philosophic, cultural, and political continuities and transformations from 1917 to the present will be studied. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 351 Enlightenment and Revolutions: Europe in the 17th and 18th Centuries [3]

A study that emphasizes constitutional and cultural changes and influences and their interaction with social, political, and economic developments in 17th- and 18th-century Europe. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 352 Romanticism, Nationalism, Reform: Europe in the 19th Century [3]

A study of three characteristics of 19th-century Europe that reflect intellectual, political, economic, and social forces involved in shaping the continent as it would be on the eve of World War I. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 353 Nationalism in Europe [3]

Nationalism has been a force in European history from the nation-state building of the early modern period to the present. It has developed and changed from a force for political unity to a divisive and sometimes destructive influence. We will look at the growth of nationalism in places as diverse as Italy, Germany, Greece, Bosnia, and Albania. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 354 The Experience of World War [3]

The 20th century has been called the “century of total war.” This course—dealing with the World Wars of the 20th century—attempts to explain what this means intellectually, politically, economically, ethically, and scientifically. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor. (A)

HIS 356 Genocide in the Modern World [3]

This course will investigate and compare modern instances of genocide, while seeking to determine factors that make genocide possible in a given society. This study of attempts to exterminate whole races of people will include aboriginal peoples of America and Australia, the Armenian Massacre, the Holocaust, Cambodia, and the former Yugoslavia. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor. (AME)

HIS 453 Senior Seminar: Nationalism in Europe [3]

Nationalism has been a force in European history from the nation-state building of the early modern period to the present day. It has developed and changed from a force for political unity to a divisive and sometimes destructive influence. We will look at the growth of nationalism in places as diverse as Italy, Germany, Greece, Bosnia, and Albania. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, 130, and 131; or permission of instructor.

456 Senior Seminar: Genocide in the Modern World [3]

This course will investigate and compare modern instances of genocide, while seeking to determine factors that make genocide possible in a given society. This study of attempts to exterminate whole races of people will include aboriginal peoples of America and Australia, the Armenian Massacre, the Holocaust, Cambodia, and the former Yugoslavia. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and 130; or permission of instructor. (AME)

History of Asia and the Middle East (AME)


HIS 205/JS 205/REL 205/SOC 205 Israel: History and Society [3]

This course examines some of the key issues in the development of Is] raeli history, culture, society, and the arts. In seeking to create a radical new society, Israelis have created a unique culture that blends traditional Jewish culture in its Middle Eastern, Western European, and Eastern European forms. We study major themes in Zionist and Israeli history and the development of Israeli culture through a focus on the central questions that have both unified and divided Israeli society.

HIS 209 Civilization in the Ancient World [3]

The first transitions to civilization in the Tigris-Euphrates, Nile, Indus, and Huang-Ho valleys; the avenues of cultural interchange to the crystallization of the characteristic culture patterns of India, China, and the Near East. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of department chair. (E)

HIS 212 Traditions of China and Japan [3]

A survey of the East Asian tradition from earliest times to the eve of the modern era. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or 101, or permission of instructor.

HIS 214/JS 214/REL 214 Jewish History from the Exile to the Enlightenment [3]

The development and diversity of Jewish life from the destruction of the Second Commonwealth to the French Revolution: the social and spiritual problems of dispersion; the evolution of Jewish society and culture in the Near East and Europe; the historical roots of anti-Semitism; the rise of the ghetto; and relations between the historical experience of the Jews and spiritual currents within their religion, such as Kabbala and Hasidism. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor. (E)

HIS 215/JS 215/REL 215 Introduction to World Religions [3]

A historical study of major modern religions of the West (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and East (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto). This course also examines (1) the methodologies of religious studies, (2) the characteristics that religions share, and (3) the classic questions that religions address. No prerequisite. (E)

HIS 216/JS 216/REL 216 Modern Jewish History [3]

The reciprocal effects of Jewish emancipation and Western history in the modern era, from the French Revolution to the present. Particular emphasis on the Zionist movement and the rise of the “Third Jewish Commonwealth,” the modern state of Israel, viewed both as products of post-Enlightenment nationalism and in their unique aspects. No prerequisite. (E)

HIS 218 Land of the Rising Sun: Contemporary Media and Print about Japan [3]

This course will dispel old stereotypes and replace them with new insights on Japan. Japanese history, society, culture, politics, and economy from the end of World War II to the present will be covered. A variety of readings will offer participants the opportunity to see Japanese culture from a different vantage point. Class discussions, enhanced by films, cover a variety of relevant issues, including gangsters and crime, role of the emperor, future political and economic directions, gender questions, children and education, and everyday life in Japan. Prerequisite: History 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 233 U.S.-China Relations [3]

An interdisciplinary course analyzing the historical development of U.S.-China relations. The nature of their historical and contemporary views is studied as a reflection of cultural orientation. Their past economic relations are investigated and future relations anticipated. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or 130. (A)

HIS 235 The Modern Middle East [3]

The attempt of the Muslim world to modernize without abandoning religious belief or cultural distinctiveness. Topics include the political and intellectual pressure of the West; traditional attempts at social and political reform; and the innovations of nationalism, constitutionalism, and socialism. The course includes a discussion of the contemporary search for identity, development, and peace. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 271 Southeast Asia in the 20th Century [3]

Southeast Asia is a mosaic of diverse people: Malays, Thais, Burmese, Vietnamese, and many others. These people and their nations are the budding economic “tigers” of the 21st century. This course selects certain Southeast Asian nations and examines their economy, politics, society, culture, and history. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 272/EC 346 Industrialization in Asia [3]

An examination of the responses of non-Western societies to contact with Western technological superiority since the Meiji Era in Japan and their varied experiences with the imperatives of induced industrialization, as distinguished from the earlier Western pattern of spontaneous industrialization. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 306/JS 306/POL 376/SOC 306 Archaeology of the Land of Israel [3]

This course provides students with an overview of the chronological and cultural structure of the archaeological periods from the third millennium through the Byzantine period, with emphasis on the Roman and Byzantine eras. The course includes fieldwork in Israel, lectures, workshops on material culture, museum tours, and field trips. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. Beyond these required activities, a primary objective of the course is a research paper to be completed during the spring or summer following the return to the United States. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture. All students will complete field and class work for both courses. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

HIS 307/JS 307/POL 377/SOC 307 Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture [3]

This course is an introduction to excavation techniques and material culture. It includes principles of excavation and recording, material culture identification/processing, and fieldstudy tours. Early synagogues and church architecture serve as foci for analysis. This course contains a full introduction to the methodology of Near Eastern archaeology from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age, practical instruction in ceramic typology and Semitic inscriptions, and a survey of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine society. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeology of the Land of Israel. All students will complete field and class work for both courses. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

HIS 308/JS 308/REL 308 Bible and Archaeology—Old Testament [3]

A critical introduction to the history and literature of the Hebrew Bible in light of its setting in the ancient Near East, using the discoveries of recent scholarship, including archaeology, literary, and textual criticism. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

HIS 317/JS 317/REL 317 The Talmud: Its History and Literary Development [3]

This course introduces the student to the history and literature of the Talmud, the central work of Jewish law and lore that evolved from about 200 B.C.E. (= B.C.) to 500 C.E. (= A.D.). By examining the pertinent texts in their historical context, students concentrate on major issues that also engrossed Greek and Roman thinkers. Such matters as the sanctity of life, theories of democracy and justice, capital punishment, civil and criminal law, and the roles of women and their rights are analyzed amid the relevant historical events and trends and the larger societies that surrounded the Jews. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

HIS 318/JS 318/PHI 318/REL 318 Maimonides in Historical Context [3]

This course introduces the student to the writing, life, and historical context of Moses Maimonides. After a survey of the history of Rabbinic Judaism and Islamic culture, the life and times of Maimonides will be treated. The science, metaphysics, and philosophy shared by Jews, Christians, and Muslims will be examined using Maimonides’ life and his philosophical, legal, and medical works as implements of analysis. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

HIS 333 Revolutions in 20th-Century Asia [3]

Varied expressions, in ideology and action, of the revolutionary impulse in the non-Western world since 1898; case studies of the major revolutionary experiences in Turkey and China, and lesser movements elsewhere. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 336/JS 336 The Arabs and Israel [3]

The course traces the intellectual roots and political development of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Some of the topics include traditional Muslim-Jewish relations, the development of Arab Nationalism and Zionism, and the factors leading to the creation of the state of Israel. Contemporary topics include the creation of an Israeli nationality, the effects of the four wars fought since 1948, and the ever-continuing search for peace. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor.

HIS 356 Genocide in the Modern World [3]

This course will investigate and compare modern instances of genocide, while seeking to determine factors that make genocide possible in a given society. This study of attempts to exterminate whole races of people will include aboriginal peoples of America and Australia, the Armenian Massacre, the Holocaust, Cambodia, and the former Yugoslavia. Prerequisite: HIS 100 or permission of instructor. (E)

HIS 433 Senior Seminar: Revolutions in 20th-Century Asia [3]

A study of varied expressions, in ideology and action, of the revolutionary impulse in the non-Western world since 1898. Case studies of the major revolutionary experiences in Turkey and China and lesser movements elsewhere will be emphasized. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, 130, and 131; or permission of instructor.

HIS 456 Senior Seminar: Genocide in the Modern World [3]

This course will investigate and compare modern instances of genocide, while seeking to determine factors that make genocide possible in a given society. This study of attempts to exterminate whole races of people will include aboriginal peoples of America and Australia, the Armenian Massacre, the Holocaust, Cambodia, and the former Yugoslavia. Prerequisites: HIS 100, 101, and 130; or permission of instructor. (E)

475/JS 475/REL 475 Senior Seminar: Hebrew Prophets [3]

A critical survey of the messages and roles of the Hebrew prophets in light of their historical, cultural, and theological background in Israel and the ancient Near East. The course will include an examination of prophecy in the Biblical literature. Prerequisite: HIS/JS/REL 308 or permission of instructor.
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