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Psychology Course Offerings

A listing of offered courses follows with prerequisites.  Please note that some courses do have additional fees associated with them.  The credit value of each course is represented by the number in brackets.

Undergraduate Course Offerings
Graduate Course Offerings

Undergraduate Courses


All courses other than Introductory Psychology require at least PSY 101 or 102 as a prerequisite. Non-majors should elect whichever introductory course best meets their personal interest. Majors should take PSY 101 before PSY 102.

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology: Concepts [3]

This course focuses on the basic concepts and methods of psychology. Topics include history; methodology; biological bases of behavior; child, adolescent, and adult development; sensation and perception; states of consciousness; learning, memory, and cognition. (Please note that it is a requirement in PSY 101 that all students participate as a subject in at least one experiment within the department during the semester or discuss with the course instructor an appropriate alternative.)

PSY 102 Introductory Psychology: Applications [3]

This course focuses on the applications of psychology. Topics include intelligence, motivation, emotion, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, health, and psychology applied to the workplace and society. (Please note that it is a requirement in PSY 102 that all students participate as a subject in at least one experiment within the department during the semester or discuss with the course instructor an appropriate alternative.)

PSY 132/EDP 132 Human Development [3]

Theories and research in human development from infancy through adulthood. Students will carry out structured observations and integrate these observations with various theoretical issues. (Please note that this course will not fulfill a requirement for the psychology major or minor.)

PSY 205 Career Development [3]

This course examines the theoretical and empirical issues related to personal satisfaction in the choice of work and career. Topics include developmental models of behavior; goal setting and the planning process; the assessment of values, interest, abilities, and personality characteristics; job analysis and job description; decision making; the development of self-esteem; and marketing yourself. Emphasis will be divided approximately equally between scholarly work and experiential activities. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102. Laboratory fee.

PSY 210/BIO 210 Physiological Psychology [3]

This course is an introduction to the physiological bases of behavior in normal psychological functioning. Topics include neuron structure and function, functional neuroanatomy, drugs and behavior, and the physiology of hunger, sex, sleep, emotion, reward/punishment, language, and learning and memory. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or 102, and BIO 110 or 111.

PSY 222 Principles of Learning, Conditioning, and Behavior [3]

Theories of learning focus on how and why behavior changes because of experience. The goal of this course is to present students with an introduction to basic theories and principles of learning with applications in the fields of business, parenting, education, and psychotherapy. Topics include Pavlovian procedures, reinforcement, vicarious learning, and extinction of behaviors. The focus of the course is on the role of learning in the adaptation of beings to a changing environment. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 232/EDH 232 Mental Retardation: Concepts and Theories [3]

The study of the meaning and concepts associated with the field of mental retardation. Includes the historical, social, developmental, theoretical, and educational aspects of mental retardation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Please note that this course will not fulfill a requirement for the psychology major or minor.)

PSY 240 Infant and Child Development [3]

Child growth and behavior from the prenatal period to puberty are studied. Effects of heredity and environment on the motor, language, social, and emotional development of children. Emphasis on the concept of developing self and its effects on behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 242 Adolescent and Emerging Adult Development [3]

This course focuses on the individual during the period of transition from childhood to adulthood. Includes physical changes, mental growth, changes in emotional reaction, personality development, and the changing nature of social relationships. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 244 Early, Middle, and Late Adult Development [3]

This course will study the psychological development of adults, including, but not limited to, individual development from both physical and psychological perspectives, personal adjustment, and psychological changes that occur throughout adulthood. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 245 Psychological Aspects of Parenting [3]

This course focuses on psychological techniques applicable to parenting. A problem-solving and problem-preventing approach are emphasized. Some of the topics covered under this general approach include discipline, sex education, behavior modification techniques, parenting styles, sibling relationships, alcohol and drug education, parenting special needs children, and building self-esteem in children. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 247 Psychological Aspects of Death and Dying [3]

Coming to terms with death is the supreme psychological challenge individuals must face in their personal lives and in the inter-relationships within families. This course examines ways in which individuals deal with death and with its consequences of grief and mourning. Subjects include the “normal” deaths of old age and the special problems of coping with death in the young due to accidents, illnesses, and the modern crisis of AIDS. Prerequisite:PSY101or102.

PSY 248/GS 248 Psychology of Gender [3]

Analysis of the roles of physiological, psychological, and social factors in the definition of gender- and sex role–related behaviors. Representative theories and research into sex differences and similarities are reviewed. The concepts of masculinity, femininity, and androgyny in today’s rapidly changing society are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 252 Social Psychology [3]

The social and cultural factors affecting human behavior, with particular emphasis on their effects on motivation, personality, attitudes, and opinions. Social interaction processes, including group dynamics, are also studied. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 253 Psychology Applied to the Workplace [3]

The application of the scientific method to human problems in the workplace. Major areas of emphasis include motivation, job satisfaction, selection, training, evaluation, equipment design, and consumer behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 255 Personality Psychology [3]

Overview of the major theoretical and empirical research in personality and individual differences. Topics include the development and determinants of personality; the consistency of behaviors across situations and over time; the concepts of the self and the unconscious; and psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, existential, behavioral, and social learning perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 257 Multicultural Issues in Psychology [3]

A psychological analysis of the impact of multiculturalism on the development of the individual and the implications on personal adjustment and growth. Topics include ethnic and gender issues as well as other multicultural issues. The course is structured to permit open discussion and critical reflection grounded on personal experience and scholarly readings. Emphasis is placed on clinical practice in multi-cultural settings, diversity in the workplace, and multiculturalism and education. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 258/GS 258 Human Sexual Behavior [3]

This course emphasizes the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and societal aspects of human sexual behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, the development of sex roles, sexuality across the age span, sexual attitudes, sexual arousal and dysfunction, variations of sexual orientation, legal and economic issues, and research methods. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 260 Psychology of Adjustment [3]

The human adjustment process. Elements in normal personality development are examined. Reactions to the typical stresses and frustrations in normal living situations are studied with a view toward understanding effective adjustments as well as defensive behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 261 Stress and Stress Management [3]

This course examines stress in contemporary society and the relationship between stress and well-being. It focuses on how persons respond to stress and the effect of long-term stress, situations and attitudes that lead to stress, and strategies for reducing stress in daily life. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 262 Abnormal Psychology [3]

The study of a wide variety of psychological and related disorders, including psychoses, neurologically-based disorders, adjustment, and anxiety-based problems. These are examined from various perspectives, such as psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, and neurological. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 265 Sports Psychology [3]

Sports psychology, defined as the application of psychological principles to athletic endeavors, focuses on improving athletic performance, maintaining athletes’ mental health in the stress of competition, establishing communication within the athletics system, developing effective coaching behavior, and optimizing team performance. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 270W Research Methods and Statistical Analysis I [3]

An introduction to the research process in psychology. This course deals with the topics of research methodology, data collection, descriptive and basic inferential statistics, and report writing. Students learn to use a computer statistical package as part of the course requirements. (Writing-intensive course) Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102. Laboratory fee.

PSY 290-295 Special Topics in Psychology [all 3]

Selected topics in psychology, varying from year to year in accordance with the needs of the curriculum and the availability of specialists in such topics. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 102.

PSY 311 Brain and Behavior [3]

An introduction to the field of biopsychology with emphasis on the relationship of this specialty to all areas of psychological research. Topics include brain structure and function, techniques for studying brain/behavior, sensory and motor mechanisms, motivation, sleep, and biological bases of psychopathology. Prerequisites: One 200-level PSY course and BIO 110 or 111.

PSY 320 Thinking, Memory, and Problem Solving [3]

This course provides an introductory survey of the field of cognitive psychology with emphasis on problems of current interest. Topics include perception, mental imagery, memory, problem solving, reasoning, language, creativity, and social cognition. Areas of application of principles (for example, in education, therapy, communications, etc.) are discussed. Prerequisite: One 200-level PSY course.

PSY 323W Health Psychology [3]

An examination of the contributions psychology offers medicine and related health professions, with emphasis on the etiology of and recovery from physical illness as well as the promotion of health. Topics include stress, pain, cardiovascular disease, smoking, alcohol abuse, eating disorders, exercise, and fitness. This course is open to all students and should be particularly relevant to health, business, and education majors. Prerequisite: One 200-level PSY course. (Writing-intensive course)

PSY 332/EDH 332 Learning Disabilities: Concepts and Theories [3]

The study of the meaning and concepts associated with the field of learning disabilities. Includes the divergent characteristics of children with perceptual, motor, and conceptual impairment. Prerequisite: EDH 120 or permission of instructor. (Please note that this course will not fulfill a requirement for the psychology major or minor.)

PSY 333/EDH 333 Emotional Disturbances: Concepts and Theories [3]

The study of the major emotionally maladjusted. Includes characteristics, treatment approaches, and classroom applications. Prerequisite: EDH 120. (Please note that this course will not fulfill a requirement for the psychology major or minor.)

PSY 367 Theories of Psychotherapy [3]

An integration of major theories of personality with the major forms of psychotherapeutic intervention. Psychoanalytic, existential, Rogerian, Gestalt, behavioral, and family systems approaches are defined and compared with one another. The empirical significance and philosophical assumptions of each approach and personality theory are explored. Prerequisite: One 200-level PSY course.

PSY 372 Research Methods and Statistical Analysis II [3]

A continued study of the research process in psychology, providing more complex research activities in and out of the laboratory with a focus on ethical issues and control. Coverage of statistical topics will be extended to include advanced inferential and correlational methods. Prerequisite: C– or above in PSY 270W, or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

PSY 380 Contemporary Studies in Psychology [3]

Concentrated studies in contemporary psychology, such as decision making, intervention methods, gender issues, developmental issues, and health issues. Students may repeat this course as the topics meet their individual curricula needs. Prerequisite: One 200-level PSY course.

PSY 384, 385 Student Internship (Junior Year) [3, 3]

This course provides supervised work experience for qualified juniors in psychology. The agencies where students will work may include, but are not limited to, alcohol and drug treatment programs, community mental health clinics, mental hospitals, schools for handicapped children, schools for emotionally disturbed children, and criminal justice treatment centers. Graded on a Pass/No Pass basis. Prerequisites: GPA of at least 2.5, both overall and in psychology; five courses in psychology above the introductory level; and permission of the department’s coordinator of academic services.

PSY 405 History and Systems in Psychology [3]

A review of the origins of psychology as a science. Major theories of human functioning are presented in connection with the people and events that produced them. Prerequisite: Five courses in psychology above the introductory level.

PSY 425 Motivation and Emotion [3]

The phrase motivational techniques is being applied to an ever-increasing number of activities in areas such as business, personal development, sports, and health. Traditionally, the study of motivation has been concerned with factors that influence the arousal, direction, and persistence of behavior. This course provides an overview of the biological, learned, cognitive, and affective factors that help energize our actions and encourages a critical appraisal of the psychological foundations of popular motivational programs. Prerequisites: Three PSY courses above the introductory level.

PSY 465 Clinical and Counseling Psychology [3]

This course is designed to provide an exploration of those theories, principles, and practices involved in the practice of clinical and counseling psychology. The course examines historical foundations, the four major theoretical models in clinical and counseling psychology (psychodynamics, behavioral and cognitive behavioral, humanistic, and family systems), stages of psychotherapy, areas of specialization, ethical standards, and graduate training and professional practices. Prerequisite: Three PSY courses above the introductory level.

PSY 470W Research Methods and Statistical Analysis III [3]

The third course in the research methodology sequence, applies the principles of research design to the study of contemporary psychological issues. In this capstone course, independent projects allow students to gain firsthand research experience. Prerequisite: C– or above in PSY 372, or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

PSY 484, 485 Student Internship (Senior Year) [3, 3]

This course provides supervised work experience for qualified seniors in psychology. The agencies where students will work may include, but are not limited to, alcohol and drug treatment programs, community mental health clinics, mental hospitals, schools for handicapped children, schools for emotionally disturbed children, and criminal justice treatment centers. Graded on a Pass/No Pass basis. Prerequisites: GPA of at least 2.5, both overall and in psychology; five courses in psychology above the introductory level; and permission of the department’s coordinator of academic services.

PSY 487 Honors Seminar [3]

Seminar will focus on selected topics of major contemporary interest in the field. Instructor of record will enlist other faculty members from the department who have special expertise in these areas for presentation to the seminar participants. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors program in psychology.

PSY 488 Honors Thesis [3]

Preparation of an honors thesis under the supervision of a departmental advisor and defense of the thesis before a departmental Honors Committee. Prerequisite: PSY 487.

PSY 489 Independent Study [1–3]

For superior students. Projects are selected by the students with permission of the instructor. Emphasis on individual study of the literature and, where appropriate, research work. A meeting with the faculty advisor is held each week for discussion of methodology, for review of recent developments in psychology, and for presentation of student progress reports. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

PSY 490–495 Selected Topics in Psychology [1–3]

Selected topics in psychology, varying year to year according to the needs of the curriculum, interest of individual students, and the availability of specialists in such topics. Prerequisite: Three PSY courses above the introductory level.

Graduate Courses


CPS 080, 081, 082 Predoctoral Internship [0, 0, 0]

A student doing the required one-year pre-doctoral internship must enroll in this noncredit course for administrative purposes. Prerequisites: Psy.D. candidacy and acceptance in an approved predoctoral internship.

CPS 090-091-092 Dissertation Continuance [0]

Continued preparation of the doctoral dissertation under the supervision of a dissertation committee.

CPS 600-609 Independent Study [1–3]

Projects selected by the students with permission of the instructor. Emphasis on individual study of the literature and research work in a particular area of interest.

CPS 611 Individual Psychotherapy [3]

In this introductory course in the art and science of psychotherapy, various models of intervention are discussed. Emphasis is on the psychodynamic, existential, and contemporary approaches. Empirically-validated treatments are covered.

CPS 612 Intake and Treatment Planning [1]

This course focuses on some of the initial practical skills necessary for operating effectively in a mental health facility. Prerequisite: CPS 611.

CPS 613 Psychological Assessment I [3]

This initial assessment course covers principles of test construction, reliability, and validity; the standard error of measurement; item analysis; and the concept and use of factor analysis. In addition, discussion focuses on the establishment of rapport, principles of assessment and test administration, and the ethics of assessment. Students learn the administration scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence tests and are introduced to objective and actuarial techniques of personality assessment. Laboratory fee.

CPS 614 Psychological Assessment II [3]

This second segment of the assessment sequence provides students with an understanding of advanced testing procedures and interpretation of cognitive and personality assessment techniques. Students continue to further skills acquired in CPS 613 and learn new skills, including the administration and scoring of the Rorschach. In addition, students learn other types of clinical assessment, including the use of demographic information, the role of clinical interviews and history taking, the development of behavioral base rates, and the use of other behavior assessment techniques. Prerequisite: CPS 613. Laboratory fee.

CPS 615 Psychological Assessment III [3]

This final segment of the assessment sequence provides students with the skill necessary for the synthesis and integration of assessment data. Students learn how to formulate and refine referral questions, to select tests included in a test battery and other assessment procedures, and to communicate assessment results via written reports that can be used by various professionals and lay people. In addition, students focus on clinical interpretation of the Rorschach and are exposed to special assessment techniques. Prerequisite: CPS 614. Laboratory fee.

CPS 616-617 Professional Practice Seminar I-II [3-3]

This seminar is taken in conjunction with CPS 651-652. Its focus is the evaluation and development of student clinical competencies in mental health service delivery. The format is small group with faculty leadership. The goal of the seminar is the integration of theoretical understanding with clinical practice. It is designed to provide an intensive, clinically- focused learning experience. Certain sections of this course are designated as child sections. In addition to covering the preceding material, focus is on clinical issues when working with children and adolescents and their families. Prerequisites: Second-year status in program or permission from instructor. Students in a child section must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the program director.

CPS 619 Clinical Issues in Health Psychology [3]

A study of psychological and social sequelae of illnesses such as cancer and AIDS, and the role of psychologists in providing clinical assessments and psychotherapy in medical settings. Topics include identifying and treating medical patients at greatest risk for major psychological complications; pain assessment and treatment; death and bereavement; cross-cultural models of illness and healing; and the roles of meaning, identity, social support, and spirituality for those with advanced illnesses. Prerequisite: Third-year class standing or permission of the program director.

CPS 625 Gender and Sexuality Issues in Clinical Psychology [3]

Gender and sexuality issues are common concerns, both expressed and unexpressed, in psychotherapy. The intent of this course is to familiarize the clinician with gender and sexuality issues by examining the following: (1) the concept of gender through current and controversial theories on gender, gender expression, and identity development; (2) sexual orientation issues and gender/sexual socialization; and (3) transgressive gender identity. Included also is exploration of current sexual norms and values, with implications for constructed sexualities as well as treatment issues and interventions.

CPS 639 Advanced Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies [3]

Treatment based on the foundations of learning and cognitive theories is explored, and techniques derived from these theories are thoroughly examined. Practical application of these techniques is discussed. Behavioral assessment techniques are reviewed. Current research findings are considered. Prerequisite: Completion of second-year curriculum or permission from instructor.

CPS 651-652 Psy.D. Practicum I-II [3-3]

The practicum provides applied experiences in clinical-service activities to clinical populations. Assessment, intervention, and consultation activities are conducted under the supervision of doctoral-level clinical psychologists in local professional agencies. For students in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track, CPS 651-652 or CPS 751-752 must be performed in a practicum site that serves children, adolescents, and/or families.

CPS 665 Advanced Research Design in Clinical Psychology [3]

Research designs (randomized groups, correlated groups, mixed, single subject, and quasi-experimental) are examined in detail through written critiques of published research studies. Types of research (ex post facto, laboratory experiments, field experiments and studies, and surveys) and methods of observation and data collection (interview and interview schedules, objective tests and scales, projective methods and content analysis, observation of behavior, semantic differential and Q methodology, and psychophysiological methods) are reviewed in detail. Consideration is also given to sex and gender issues and legal and ethical issues in clinical research. Prerequisite: PSY 510 or its equivalent.

CPS 666 Advanced Psychopathology [3]

Psychological, behavioral, and organic disorders are examined, with an emphasis on theoretical perspectives (analytic/dynamic, behavioral, existential/humanistic, biological, and socio-cultural). Diagnostic classification systems are reviewed in detail, and the making of differential diagnoses is stressed. Treatment implications and current research findings are considered. Certain sections of this course are designated as child sections. In addition to covering the preceding material, more in-depth attention is paid to the DSM-IV-TR’s Disorders First Diagnosed in Infancy, Childhood, or Adolescence and other relevant issues when working with psychopathology in children, adolescents, and their families. Prerequisite: Students in child section must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the program director.

CPS 667 Advanced Seminar in Brief Therapy [3]

This course focuses on the practice and philosophy of brief psychotherapy, which is rapidly becoming the dominant form of therapeutic intervention today. Such modalities as psychodynamic, existential, cognitive-behavioral, family, systemic, self-psychological, and constructivist are explored and various applications in particular contexts examined. Prerequisite: Third-year class standing or permission of the program director.

CPS 668 Psychopharmacology [1]

An introduction to the basic physiological mechanisms involved with the use of psychotropic medications. Descriptions of the effects of commonly prescribed medications, guidelines for their use, side effects, and guidelines for their recommendations and appropriate referral to prescribing physicians are offered. Prerequisite: PSY 521.

CPS 669 Writing Workshop [1]

This course familiarizes students with the technical aspects of writing in psychology as presented in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2010). It includes information on editing, syntax/grammar, and writing in nonsexist language. Participants also learn about the essentials of an introduction and literature review, with special emphasis on using sources effectively.

CPS 670 Consultation in Health Delivery Systems: Case Perspectives [1]

This course introduces psychology students to the emerging field of collaboration between mental-health and physical health providers, and identifies ways that psychologists can incorporate principles of collaborative care into their ongoing work with families. Through readings, lectures, case examples, and discussion, students learn skills for working with families with medical crises and learn principles of collaboration. Highlighting barriers and facultative resources, students integrate collaborative skills in their practicum settings and consider how to facilitate collaboration with other professionals in all clinical contexts. Prerequisite: Second-year matriculated status in doctoral program or permission from instructor.

CPS 671 Systems Consultation in Health Delivery Systems: Systems Perspectives [1]

This course focuses on mental health agencies as systems and addresses ways of understanding them as such and promoting their effectiveness. Prerequisites: Completion of CPS 670 and third-year class standing, or permission of program director.

CPS 681 Contemporary Issues in Clinical Psychology [3]

A series of semester-long courses, offered periodically, that examine the critical parameters in a variety of clinical content areas. Topics include such areas of concern as substance abuse and treatment; adolescent development and psychopathology; the treatment of violence, trauma, neglect, and abuse; the treatment of borderline personality disorders; narcissism: development and treatment; constructivist psychotherapy; postmodern approaches to treatment. Prerequisite: Third-year class standing or permission of program director.

CPS 690-694 Special Topics in Clinical Psychology [3]

Selected topics in clinical psychology, varying from year to year in accordance with the needs of the curriculum and the availability of specialists in such topics.

CPS 695 Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theories [3]

An integration and comprehensive overview of major contemporary psychoanalytic theories since 1940. Post-Freudian views are discussed, including the major developments in ego-psychology, self-psychology, and object-relations theories. Applications to clinical work and psychotherapy are included, as well as implications of these theories to recent developments in feminism, systems theories, and infant psychology. Prerequisite: Third-year class standing or permission of program director.

CPS 710 Advanced Issues in Child Assessment [3]

Students in this course gain an understanding of the most popular instruments used in assessment of children and adolescents. They learn assessment procedures and processes used to identify behavioral and psychological issues, as well as developmental delays, learning disabilities and neurological impairments. Special attention is paid to the assessment and evaluation of culturally diverse children. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of PA I, II, and III. Matriculation into the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or permission from instructor.

CPS 715 Clinical Interventions with Adolescents [3]

The intent of this course is to provide students with a strong background in both theory and clinical practice with adolescents. Topics include some of the major psychological theories of adolescent development, the biological contexts of adolescence, adolescent values and identity, adolescent relationships, evidence-based practice, and the unique clinical treatment issues and techniques for this population. Prerequisite: Third-year matriculation in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or permission from the instructor.

CPS 720 Programmatic Interventions with Children and Adolescents [3]

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to various systems that may have an influence on the life of a child or adolescent and/or the family. Students learn the functions of diverse child agencies and systems and how these organizations both interface and contrast with one another. Prerequisites: Students must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the instructor.

CPS 725 Clinical Foundations [3]

This course focuses on the development of fundamental interview and psychotherapy skills through reading, discussion, observation, practice, and feedback. Ethical principles, legal issues, and crisis intervention are also covered. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Psy.D. program.

CPS 740-741 Case Conference Seminar I-II [3-3]

This third-year seminar sequence is designed for intensive clinical supervision in small groups. Students provide case presentations via written reports and case material in audio and audiovisual formats. The purpose of the seminar is the monitoring and development of student clinical competencies and special proficiencies. This is a companion course to CPS 751-752. Certain sections of the course are designated as child sections. Students in these sections perform their field training at child, adolescent, and/or family sites; the leader of this seminar has special expertise in the assessment and treatment of these populations. Prerequisite: Students in designated child sections must be matriculated into the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the instructor.

CPS 751-752 Psy.D. Practicum III-IV [3-3]

The practicum provides applied experiences in clinical-service activities to clinical populations. Assessment, intervention, and consultation activities are conducted under the supervision of doctoral-level clinical psychologists in local professional agencies. Prerequisite for CPS 751: Satisfactory completion of Practicum I and II. Prerequisite for CPS 752: Satisfactory completion of Practicum I, II, and III. For students in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track, CPS 651-652 or CPS 751-752 must be performed in a practicum site that serves children, adolescents, and/or families.

CPS 760 Forensic Psychology [3]

This course covers the topics of the U.S. court system, legal status of the psychologist, mental-commitment procedures, expert testimony, evaluation techniques in personal injury, emotional damages, child abuse and child custody issues, and consideration of malpractice and ethical problems. Prerequisite: Completion of second-year curriculum or permission of instructor.

CPS 762 Substance Abuse, Theory, and Interventions [3]

Integrating contributions from clinical practice and research, this course provides an overview of the use and abuse of drugs and the meaning of addiction. Application of theoretical frameworks to clinical practice are examined. Prerequisite: Third-year class standing or permission of program director.

CPS 800 Advanced Seminar in Systems Theory and Family Therapy [3]

Models of family therapy have been replacing individual therapy as the primary treatment method in many agencies and clinical institutions. This seminar explores and compares contemporary family therapy techniques and illustrates how they may be applied to many clinical problems. Theoretical understanding is also emphasized. There may be times when certain sections of this course are designated as child sections. In addition to covering the preceding material, focus is on common issues of treatment when children and adolescents are part of family treatment. Prerequisites: Second-year status in program or permission from instructor. Students in child section must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the instructor.

CPS 810 Group Theory and Practice [3]

A comparison of theories and formal models of group therapy and an understanding of the essential aspects of effective group interaction. Experiential and observation methods are employed to study change processes, leadership behavior, alliance formation, conflict resolution, and problem solving of a variety of clinical symptoms.

CPS 811 Advanced Group Therapy [3]

This small seminar (8–12 students) builds on basic concepts and skills students gained in the first-year course, Group Theory and Practice, providing advanced group-membership opportunities, leadership opportunities with coaching and demonstrations by the instructor, as well as advanced theoretical considerations. Prerequisites: Third-year class standing and CPS 810 or its equivalent, or permission of program director.

CPS 830 Foundations of Behavior Change [3]

Using a small-group seminar format, this course explores the foundations of change, whether brought about by psychodynamic treatment, strategy therapy, or behavioral therapies. The impact of communication and communication models are examined in attempting to determine the nature of change underlying all treatment models as well as spontaneous behavior change. Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing and permission of program director.

CPS 849 Professional Seminar: Diversity [3]

This course addresses ethnicity, race, gender, class, age, ability, sexual orientation, and oppression as they impact mental health and the provision of mental health services. Topics include psychosocial sources of prejudice; psychotherapy as reflective of cultural values; gender, racial, and ethnic socialization; and self-reflection on one’s own background as it influences clinical transactions. This course explores a variety of cultures and populations and discusses issues relevant to the provision of psychological services to members of these groups. Certain sections of this course are designated as child sections. In addition to covering the preceding material, focus is on issues of diversity when working with children and adolescents and their families. Prerequisites: Second-year status in program or permission from instructor. Students in child section must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the instructor.

CPS 850 Professional Seminar: Ethics [3]

Professional, ethical, and legal issues related to the practices of clinical psychology and to the psychologist as clinician, consultant, educator, and researcher are critically examined. Issues include control, privacy, privilege, confidentiality and the duty to warn, informed consent, patients’ rights, malpractice, the patient-therapist relationship, policing the profession and those prominent in psychological assessment, working with children, group psychotherapy, and marital therapy. Certain sections of this course are designated as child sections. In addition to covering the preceding material, focus is on special ethical and legal issues when working with children and adolescents and their families. Prerequisites: Third-year status in program or permission from instructor. Students in child section must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission from the instructor.

CPS 851 Professional Seminar: History and Systems of Psychology [3]

A historical review studying the origins of and cultural influences on modern psychological thought. The origins and philosophy of science as they form the genesis of particular schools of psychology are reviewed. In addition, psychological theorists are studied, especially in light of their implications to recent developments in psychology.

CPS 852 Dissertation Seminar [3]

This seminar helps students to initiate the dissertation process in a small-group format under the guidance of a faculty member as a seminar leader. This seminar seeks to help students choose a dissertation topic and provides students with an overview of all the steps that must be completed in the dissertation process. Certain sections of this course are designated as child sections. In addition to covering the preceding material, focus is on ethical and methodological considerations when conducting research with children and adolescents and their families. Prerequisites: Second-year status in program or permission from instructor. Students in child section must be matriculated in the Child and Adolescent proficiency track or have permission of instructor.

CPS 853 Dissertation [3]

Continued preparation of a scholarly dissertation under the supervision of a departmental advisor and a committee consisting of the advisor and other members. Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral candidacy and permission of program director.

PSY 500 Contemporary Studies in Psychology [3]

Concentrated studies in contemporary psychology, such as decision making, intervention methods, gender issues, developmental issues, and health issues. Students may repeat this course as the topics meet their individual curriculum needs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 510 Experimental Design [3]

Provides an understanding of the concepts underlying research design and develops skills in designing studies amenable to multivariate statistical analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 520 Learning: Principles, Theories, and Applications [3]

This course will survey the various principles and theories of learning and other modes of behavioral change with an emphasis on practical applications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 521 Physiological Psychology [3]

A study of the biological foundations of behavior. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the mammalian nervous system; sensory, motor, and neural mechanisms; and the techniques of studying brain structure and function. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 523 Health Psychology [3]

This course will develop an awareness of how psychological principles and the knowledge and skills of psychologists can be applied to health-related issues. Course will include concepts of illness/ health/wellness/fitness, stress, behavioral medicine, and psychological principles as they apply to the etiology of, recovery from, and prevention of, illness and related health problems, as well as to the functioning of health care providers and systems. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 525 Multicultural Issues in Psychology [3]

A psychological analysis of the impact of race and ethnicity on the distribution of power, opportunity, and privilege. Emphasis will be placed on psychological theory regarding the relations between individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds. The course will be structured to permit open discussion and critical reflection grounded on both personal experience and scholarly readings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 527 Substance Use and Abuse [3]

A comprehensive study of substance use and abuse, including such topics as basic neurophysiology, addiction, and the effects of specific licit and illicit drugs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 530 The Psychology of Career Development [3]

This course examines the theoretical and empirical issues related to personal satisfaction in the choice of work and career. Topics include developmental models of behavior; goal setting and the planning process; the assessment of values, interests, abilities, and personality characteristics; job analysis and job description; decision making; the development of self-esteem; and marketing strategies. Emphasis will be divided approximately equally among theoretical, empirical, and experiential aspects. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

PSY 535 Introduction to Organizational Behavior [3]

This course is an overview of the field of organizational behavior at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Organizational behavior is a field that seeks knowledge of all aspects of behavior in organizational settings by the use of the scientific method. It draws from multiple disciplines, including psychology, sociology, political science, economics, and management science. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 542 Psychopathology of Childhood [3]

A survey of the various patterns of childhood pathology, including emotional, intellectual, organic, and physical handicaps. Special attention is given to cultural diversity and poverty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 552 Social Psychology [3]

Various social psychological theories of social behavior will be examined with regard to the types of causal frameworks and levels of analysis they represent. Recent empirical research and current theoretical issues will be considered in relation to theories of social psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 553 Clinical Child Developmental Psychology [3]

This course relates traditional methods of child assessment and treatment to current topics in developmental psychology. Child psychopathology will be examined in terms of cognitive and social emotional growth. Topics include maternal/infant bonding, the development of moral judgment, Piaget’s theory of intellectual development, the growth of pro-social behaviors, the impact of long- and short-term separations on children, the value of play and fantasy, the effects of child abuse, and the role of the father in child rearing. In addition, recent changes in parental roles and maternal employment will be studied to assess their impact on the child and family. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 554 Community Psychology [3]

An applied course in the interaction between the individual and the social environment, with special concern for the various models for psychological intervention as these relate to community needs and characteristics with special attention to issues of diversity and poverty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 555 Personnel Psychology [3]

Attention is given to job analysis, testing, training and development, group effectiveness, leadership and social influence, and motivation, especially as they affect productivity, work quality, and turnover. Contemporary, employee-centered strategies are examined, focusing on job and environmental redesign to fit existing human resources, psychological needs, and quality-of-life goals. Prerequisite: PSY 535.

PSY 557 Stress: Causes, Consequences, and Management [3]

The course covers definitions and explanations of stress, factors that produce it, its manifestations, and the variety of its consequences—behavioral, cognitive, and physical. Adaptive means of coping with and managing stress are covered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 560 Life-Span Development [3]

In this course, development from conception until death will be examined. Special attention is devoted to the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional changes that occur during infancy, toddlerhood, childhood, adolescence, and adult-hood. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 561 Cognitive and Psychoeducational Assessment I [3]

This course examines the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence, achievement, processing, and psychoeducational assessment instruments, including the Wechsler Scales, achievement tests, and other well-established evaluation tools in the field. Integration of information and beginning report-writing skills are discussed. Prerequisite: Full-time status in School Psychology program or permission of program director. Laboratory fee.

PSY 564 Psychopathology [3]

The psychological and/or organic determinants of the various forms of behavior disorders are studied. Emphasis is placed on various theoretical approaches to the disorders and on research that has attempted to test the validity of theoretical positions. Therapeutic interventions are discussed. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program or permission of program director.

PSY 565 Cognitive and Psychoeducational Assessment II [3]

This course is the second in a series providing an advanced examination of the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence, achievement, and psycho-educational assessment instruments, including the Wechsler Scales, measures of adaptive behavior, functional behavioral analysis methods, and other well-established evaluation tools in the field. Integration of information and beginning report-writing skills are discussed. Prerequisite: Full-time status in School Psychology program or permission of program director. Laboratory fee.

PSY 566 Personality Assessment I [3]

The utilization of various instruments in the assessment of individual personality with particular consideration of the research and methodological implications in personality evaluation. Prerequisites: PSY 580 and full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program, or permission of program director. Laboratory fee.

PSY 567 Personality Assessment II [3]

A continuation of PSY 566 with emphasis on supervised practice in the use and interpretation of various instruments. Prerequisites: PSY 566 and full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program, or permission of program director. Laboratory fee.

PSY 569 Theories of Personality [3]

Review of major theories of personality. Modern systems are studied in view of their historical antecedents and current trends. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program, or permission of program director.

PSY 571/BIO 520 Introduction to Neuroanatomy [3]

An overview of the mammalian nervous system with particular attention to the human central nervous system (CNS), structure, and function. Techniques available to study CNS structure/function relationships will also be reviewed. Prerequisites: One year of introductory biological sciences and permission of instructor.

PSY 573 Neuropsychopharmacology [3]

Neuropsychopharmacology explores the molecular mechanisms of action of drugs that modify mood and behavior, such as the opiates, tranquilizers, and antidepressants. Emphasis is placed on the chemistry of the nerve cell and the techniques used to evaluate drug-induced changes in those cells. As time permits, the neurochemical basis for selected disease states, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and schizophrenia, will be discussed. It is recommended that participants in this class have previous knowledge of physiological psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 576 Evaluation Research in the Behavioral Sciences [3]

A review of current issues and methods involved in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of information on the need for, the implementation of, and the impact of intervention efforts and program evaluation. Topics include program planning, program monitoring, impact assessment, and preparation of reports. Special emphasis will be placed on psychological measures of attitudes, achievement, personality, and behavior. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 580 Intelligence Testing [3]

The student gains knowledge of the skills in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individually-administered intelligence tests. Focus is on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and the Stanford-Binet. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program or permission of program director. Laboratory fee.

PSY 581 Advanced Research Methods [3]

This course provides a bridge between the relatively standardized experimental psychology course and the original research required for the thesis. Consideration is given to proposal preparation, pilot studies, selection of appropriate controls, instrumentation, design, ethical issues, computer analysis, interpretation of data, report preparation and presentation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 582 Research Methods: Design and Analysis [3]

This course explores quantitative and qualitative research methods of particular interest to students anticipating careers involving the delivery of psychological services in schools and clinical settings. Students learn acceptable methods of research design and develop the ability to critically evaluate statistical and evaluation methodologies as well as professional publications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 583 Introduction to School Psychology [3]

This course provides school psychology students with a survey of the historical foundations, guidelines and standards, roles and functions, legal and ethical foundations, and contemporary issues in the field of school psychology. Contents include the evolution of school psychology with attention to the practice of school psychology within public education; the school psychologist’s relationship with other school personnel, parents, and referral sources; and the development of an understanding of the organization and structure of the schools and the role of the school psychologist. Prerequisite: Full-time status in the School Psychology program or permission of instructor.

PSY 584 Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy [3]

Various approaches to counseling and psychotherapy, such as psychoanalytic, client-centered, and behavior therapies, are studied. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program or permission of program director.

PSY 585 Advanced Therapy Techniques [3]

This course is designed to provide clinical students with additional experience in the application of techniques of psychotherapy and professional communication skills with a variety of populations. Such populations might include patients, families, teachers, physicians, and other professionals. Prerequisites: PSY 584 and full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program, or permission of program director.

PSY 590–599 Special Topics in Psychology [3]

Selected topics in psychology, varying from year to year in accordance with the needs of the curriculum and the availability of specialists in such topics.

PSY 600–609 Independent Study [1–3]

Projects selected by the students with permission of the instructor. Emphasis on individual study of the literature and research work in a particular area of interest. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSY 620 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior [3]

Contemporary theories and issues in the following areas are examined: learning, memory, perception, cognition, thinking, motivation, and emotion. Research findings are evaluated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 625 Capstone Project [3]

Projects are selected by the students with permission of the instructor. Emphasis on individual study of the literature and, where appropriate, research work. A meeting with the faculty advisor is held several times during the semester for discussion of progress, review of the recent developments in the area, and presentation of student reports. Prerequisites: PSY 510 and 581, or permission of instructor.

PSY 629 Principles of Family Therapy [3]

Theoretical and clinical aspects of psychological malfunctioning in children and families are studied along with appropriate therapeutic methods for their amelioration. Prerequisites: PSY 584 and full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program, or permission of program director.

PSY 633/BIO 744 Introduction to Clinical Neurology [3]

An introduction to the principles of the neurological examination and the major categories of neurologic disease. Topics will include disorders of mobility, pain, and other disorders of somatic sensation; disorders of the special senses; disorders of consciousness; derangements of intellect, language, and behavior due to focal and diffuse cerebral disease; anxiety and disorders of energy and mood; abnormalities of growth and development of the nervous system; and the neurology of aging. Prerequisites: PSY 571 or equivalent, and permission of instructor.

PSY 649 Group Process and Psychotherapy [3]

A study of group processes and dynamics. Various approaches, theories, and techniques of group psychotherapy are examined. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program or permission of program director.

PSY 650 Consultation: Theory and Practice [3]

This course provides an exploration of consultation theory and practice and will elucidate intervention on a macrosystems level in which consultation skills will be integrated into systems theory. Each participant will develop a conceptual understanding of effective consultation and its relevance to intervention. The relationship between client, consultee, and the organization are explored as critical variables that influence the implementation and outcomes of the consultation process. The course utilizes models from school consultation, group process, systems theory, family therapy, and organizational consultation as a framework for discussion. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 655-656 Professional Seminar and Practicum in School Psychology I-II [3-3]

Professional seminar taught concurrently with a yearlong practicum in school psychology, wherein the student is expected to examine legal and ethical issues, professional issues and standard roles and functions, emergent technologies, and service delivery models in school psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of director of School Psychology program.

PSY 657-658 Practicum, Applied Psychology [3-3]

This practicum provides supervised practical experience in applied industrial organizations or health services agencies and institutions. Specific duties will be determined by consultation with student, program director and agency supervisor. Prerequisite: Permission of director of General Psychology program.

PSY 669 Child Psychotherapy [3]

A multidimensional study of treatment methods used with emotionally disturbed and learning disabled children. The course covers the theoretical basis for treatment of children and prepares advanced graduate students for practicum experiences. Therapy process as well as different theoretical schools will be studied. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program or permission of program director.

PSY 675 Multivariate Methods in the Behavioral Sciences [3]

The focus of the course is on multiple regression analysis as a foundation for and in relation to other multivariate methods, such as analysis of variance, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, and canonical correlation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY 681 Behavior Therapy [3]

The study and application of experimentally-derived principles, including those related to modeling; to classical, operant, and cognitive learning; to the treatment and amelioration of disordered behavior and construction of adaptive behavior. Prerequisite: Full-time status in Clinical/School Psychology program or permission of program director.

PSY 685-686 Thesis [3-3]

Directed independent research. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.

PSY 688-689 Practicum, M.A. in Clinical Practices [3-3]

Provides the student with intensive practice in intelligence testing, personality evaluation, counseling, and psychotherapy. Prerequisites: Matriculation in Clinical Practices in Psychology M.A. and permission of department’s director of clinical placement.

PSY 698 Professional Seminar in Ethics and Practice I: Ethical Issues in Counseling and Psychotherapy [3]

This course is taken in conjunction with PSY 688 and is designed as a University-based pro-seminar to complement the supervision provided by the practicum site. With focus on the integration of ethics and the practice of counseling and psychotherapy, this course will include discussions of the ethical codes of the American Psychological Association, the Northamerican Association for Masters in Psychology, and the American Counseling Association. Corequisite: PSY 688.

PSY 699 Professional Seminar in Ethics and Practice II: Integrating Ethical Issues, Case Formulation, and Professional Issues [3]

This course is taken in conjunction with PSY 689 and is designed as a University-based pro-seminar to complement the supervision provided by the practicum site. The emphasis of this seminar is on high-level integration of ethical issues, case formulation, identification of transference-countertransference issues, as well as other professional issues related to counseling and psychotherapy. Corequisite: PSY 689.

PSY 737 Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology [3]

This course will review the fundamentals of human neuropsychology. Students will learn about the association between brain status and behavioral function, from both normal and abnormal standpoints. Students will be introduced to procedures used in conducting a neuropsychological examination. Prerequisites: Some knowledge of either brain structure/ function or psychopathology, and permission of instructor.

PSY 754 Integration and Application of Research Data [3]

The student will prepare a major paper in which the didactic course material taken in the program will be integrated and related to the individual student’s clinical work. By arrangement.

PSY 755-756 Internship in School Psychology [3-3]

Internship in schools under the joint supervision of a certified school psychologist and University faculty. Experience includes group counseling, individual assessment, consultations, and other appropriate functions associated with school psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of the director of the School Psychology program.
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