Skip to Top Navigation Skip to Utility Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Left Navigation Skip to Content
A_S_10_2_sg.jpg
Academics About U OF H
Admission Visiting Campus
Student Life Libraries
Alumni Public Purpose
News Arts & Events
Athletics Giving to U of H

English Course Offerings

A listing of offered courses follows with prerequisites.  Please note that some courses do have additional fees associated with them.  The credit value of each course is represented by the number in brackets.


Drama


DRA 160 Introduction to Theatre [3]

Study of theatre as a collaborative art form and as a means of expressing values. Attention is centered on various aspects of theatrical art: acting, directing, design, criticism, playwriting and audience involvement. Class work may involve play reading, lectures, discussions, and participation in and attendance at productions.

DRA 161 Theatre Practicum [.5]

Designed to recognize the educational value of participation in drama productions. One-half credit will be awarded to students for satisfactory participation either backstage or onstage in a departmental production. Drama minors may earn up to 3 credits in theatre practicum. Work applied to theatre practicum must not be in connection with any other course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DRA 164 Stagecraft [3]

Introduction to the basic tools, materials, and skills needed for the execution of scenic and lighting designs. The class is directly involved in student and departmental productions.

DRA 170 Acting [3]

This course gives students a practical overview of styles, history, and current trends in acting. Activities include theatre games, improvisation, monologues, and scene study. Students are introduced to various acting techniques and styles, and work toward developing their own critical and creative faculties.

DRA 313W/ENG 313W Playwriting [3]

This course offers the opportunity to experiment with playwriting techniques in a workshop environment. The basic components of playwriting are taught, focusing particularly on character, dialogue, and plot. Students analyze plays from the standpoint of structure and take the opportunity to view and discuss local live performances. Seminars involve the workshop testing of student writing, focusing on further development of the work. It is intended that weekly writing exercises will culminate in a longer piece of work performed in a series of rehearsed readings. Prerequisite: ENG 225W or DRA 160, or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

DRA 325 Studies in Theatre and Drama [3]

An intensive study of an aspect of performance practice, dramatic writing, or dramatic literature. Students are expected to respond to local live performances. Since the subject will vary from semester to semester, this course may be elected more than once with permission from department chair. Prerequisite: DRA 160 or permission of instructor.

DRA 330/ENG 330 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama [3]

Reading and discussion of the English drama of the Tudor and Stuart periods, including plays of Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, Tourneur, Ford, and others. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

DRA 331/ENG 361 Shakespeare: Plays to 1600 [3]

Introduction to Shakespeare’s language, themes, and dramatic art as well as detailed study of representative history plays, comedies, and tragedies, chiefly before 1600. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

DRA 332/ENG 362 Shakespeare: Plays after 1600 [3]

A study of the major tragedies, Roman plays, and symbolic romances, chiefly after 1600. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

DRA 348/ENG 348 Modern Drama: Realism and Naturalism [3]

Introduction to literature of the modern theatre. Playwrights such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Wilde, Shaw, Synge, and O’Neill are studied against the background of contemporary intellectual currents and literary trends. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

DRA 349/ENG 349 Modern and Contemporary Drama [3]

Playwrights such as Pirandello, Anouilh, Brecht, Ionesco, Genet, Beckett, Pinter, and Miller are read with special attention given to experiments in dramatic forms. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or DRA 160.

DRA 362/ENG 368 The Development of Theatre [3]

This course focuses on crucial moments in the development of theatre as an art form, paying special attention to the origin and development of various theatrical forms and texts. The history of the art of acting, directing, theatre architecture, scenic lighting, costume design, and playwriting is investigated. Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

DRA 365 Fundamentals of Directing [3]

A course designed to acquaint the student with basic theory of directing, including a historical overview of the director’s changing role. Class will cover blocking, movement, various staging areas and terminology, work with actors, and interpretation of the play. Final project will be a short play or scene directed by each student. Prerequisite: DRA 160 or permission of instructor.

DRA 384, 385 Independent Study [1–6]

Advanced independent research and learning in areas not covered by conventional DRA offerings. May not be used in lieu of a conventional course. Usually taken after having completed successfully a substantial number of courses in the department. Requires submission of an articulate proposal for the study, and prior arrangement with the prospective advisor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DRA 290, 390, 391 Special Topics in Theatre [3, 3, 3]

Introduces significant topics in accordance with needs and interests of students and the community. Uses specialists in the various areas of theatre. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DRA 410 Theatre Production Workshop [3]

Students gain practical experience of theatre through workshop exercises and discussing the work of contemporary theatre practitioners. For the remainder of the course, students form groups and, under close supervision, develop short plays to be produced at a theatre festival at the end of the spring semester. This course is intended as the culminating experience of the drama minor. Prerequisites: DRA 160, and 164, and 264; or permission of instructor.

DRA 420/ENG 420 British Drama, 1660– 1830 [3]

A study of British drama between the Restoration and the Victorian era. Emphasis on changes in theatre practice (the appearance of women on the stage, the Licensing Act, spectacle), on controversies about the morality and purpose of the theatrical arts, and on the emergence of new dramatic genres (libertine comedy, she-tragedy, bourgeois tragedy, farce, comic opera, sentimental comedy, closet drama). Playwrights may include Dryden, Congreve, Behn, Wycherley, Rowe, Centlivre, Fielding, Gay, Goldsmith, Sheridan, Inchbald, Baillie, and Byron. Prerequisites: Junior standing and any 200-level literature course, or permission of instructor.

DRA 480 Internship Program [3–6]

The internship program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to augment their studies with a 12 to 15-week work experience in a theatrical organization. Typically, students work from 7 to 15 hours each week, depending on the number of credits they are taking at that time. Additional details about the program are available on request from the chair of the department. Available only to theatre and musical theatre majors.

Literature


ENG 140 Introduction to Literature [3]

Focusing on a set of literary readings different with each section of the course, students examine the nature of literary discourse, as well as perennial and contemporary issues, pleasures, and problems raised by the writing and reading of all literary texts. The course equips students to engage a variety of texts subsequently, in and out of courses, in literature and life.

Surveys of Literature


ENG 217 Survey of Postcolonial Writers [3]

We will explore the central themes and concerns of postcolonial literature, including the psychological residue left by imperialism, the suppression and revival of imagination in colonialist/postcolonialist worlds, and the problems and advantages of cultural mixing.

ENG 218 Survey of Minority Writers [3]

What is the status of minorities in literature? Is race or minority status a biological, psychological, cultural, or metaphorical concept; does its status change depending on the time period? What is race or minority status today? Minority writers and film directors will contribute to the project of defining race/minority status and how it is expressed around the world.

220 Survey of American Literature I [3]

Survey of American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War, with emphasis on such major figures as Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Dickinson and Whitman.

ENG 221 Survey of American Literature II [3]

Survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with emphasis on such major figures as Twain, James, Wharton, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway and Fitzgerald.

ENG 223/AFS 223 Survey of African American Literature [3]

Reading and discussion of selected poetry and prose, with special emphasis on the works of major figures, such as Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker.

ENG 230 Survey of English Literature I [3]

Reading and discussion of selected writers of English literature from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. Emphasis on literary tradition and influence.

ENG 231 Survey of English Literature II [3]

Reading and discussion of selected writers in English literature from the 18th century to the present. Emphasis on literary tradition and influence.

ENG 240/ML 240 Survey of European Literature I [3]

Reading and discussion of selected authors of Continental Europe to the Renaissance with emphasis on literary tradition and influence.

ENG 241/ML 241 Survey of European Literature II [3]

Reading and discussion of selected authors of Continental Europe from the Renaissance to modern times with emphasis on literary tradition and influence.

American Literature


ENG 305/GS 305/AFS 305 African American Women Writers [3]

This course has as its premise that the work of contemporary African American women writers—such as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gloria Naylor, Paule Marshall, and Sherley Anne Williams—can be interpreted in the context of an identifiable literary tradition with sources in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The course will look at the construction of this tradition in terms of specific literary themes and techniques, from “signifying” to communities of women that have been theorized by feminist and African American scholars. Prerequisites: GS 100; and either one 200-level literature course, or AFS 110 or AFS 111; or permission of instructor.

ENG 318/AFS 318 African American Autobiography [3]

This course examines African American autobiographies from the early narratives of Douglass, Jacobs and Washington to the self-conscious, lyrical texts of the 1960s and 1970s. The course also introduces students to theories of autobiography and the written self. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature class or permission of the instructor.

ENG 320 American Novel to 1914 [3]

Reading and discussion of the American novel as a genre, traced from its beginnings to the early 20th century through selected writings from such representative figures as Stowe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Dreiser, James, Wharton, Chopin and others. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 321 American Novel since 1914 [3]

Reading and discussion of the American novel as a genre, traced from the early 20th century to the present through selected writings from such representative figures as Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Updike, Bellow, Oates and others. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 322 American Poetry [3]

Reading and discussion of American poetry as a genre, in the larger context of American thought and experience. Readings include selected works from such representative figures as Whitman, Dickinson, Robinson, Frost, Pound, Stevens, Eliot, e. e. cummings and contemporary poets. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 323 Studies in American Literature [3]

An intensive study of a major writer, a selection of writers, a major literary movement or motif in American literature. Since the subject of this course will vary from semester to semester, it may be elected for credit more than once with permission of department chair. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 325/JS 325 American Jewish Novel [3]

A study of some of the major contributions to American Jewish literature since the turn of the century by American Jewish novelists. These include, among others, Gold’s Jews without Money, Cahan’s The Rise of David Levinsky, Anzia Yezierska’s Bread Givers, and a novel each by Malamud, Bellow, Roth, Potok, Doctorow, Ozick and Chernin. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

English Literature


ENG 330/DRA 330 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama [3]

Reading and discussion of the English drama of the Tudor and Stuart periods, including plays of Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, Tourneur, Ford and others. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 331 English Renaissance Literature: The 16th Century [3]

Reading and discussion of selected English authors of the Elizabethan period, such as Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Nashe and Shakespeare. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 360 Chaucer [3]

Reading, in Middle English, and discussion of the major works, including Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 361/DRA 331 Shakespeare: Plays to 1600 [3]

Introduction to Shakespeare’s language, themes, and dramatic art; detailed study of representative history plays, comedies and tragedies, chiefly before 1600. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 362/DRA 332 Shakespeare: Plays after 1600 [3]

A study of the major tragedies, Roman plays and symbolic romances, chiefly after 1600. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 363 Studies in English Literature [3]

An intensive study of a major writer, a selection of writers, a literary movement, or a motif in literature. Since the subject will vary from semester to semester, this course may be elected for credit more than once with permission of department chair. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

364 Victorian Literature [3]

Reading and discussion of the major authors of the later 19th century with emphasis on Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Newman and Mill. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 365 Nineteenth-Century English Novel [3]

Reading and discussion of works by such writers as Dickens, Thackeray, the Brontës and George Eliot. Emphasis on the development of the novel from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy as both a narrative form and a vehicle for social analysis. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 366 Modern English Novel [3]

Reading and discussion of selected modern novelists, such as Joyce, Lawrence, Forster, Ford, Woolf, Conrad and Iris Murdoch. Emphasis on the innovations of individual novels and the shared assumptions about human nature that make them “modern.” Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 367 Modern British Poetry [3]

Reading and discussion of selected British and Irish poets such as Yeats, Hardy, Eliot, Auden, Spender, Dylan Thomas, including contemporary poets such as Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 420/DRA 420 British Drama, 1660–1830 [3]

A study of British drama between the Restoration and the Victorian era. Emphasis on changes in theatre practice (the appearance of women on the stage, the Licensing Act, spectacle), on controversies about the morality and purpose of the theatrical arts, and on the emergence of new dramatic genres (libertine comedy, she-tragedy, bourgeois tragedy, farce, comic opera, sentimental comedy, closet drama). Playwrights may include Dryden, Congreve, Behn, Wycherley, Rowe, Centlivre, Fielding, Gay, Goldsmith, Sheridan, Inchbald, Baillie and Byron. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 432 Rebellion to Restoration: 17th-Century British Literature [3]

Reading and discussion of such writers as Shakespeare, Bacon, Donne, Jonson, Wroth, Herbert, Lanyer, Hobbes, Milton, Marvell, Philips, Dryden, Behn and Bunyan against the background of the enormous social, political, religious and economic turmoil England experienced between 1600 and 1700. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 433 Milton [3]

Reading and discussion of the major poems ("Comus," "Lycidas," Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, "Samson Agonistes," sonnets) and selected prose works (e.g., Of Education, Areopagitica). Also, a study of pertinent background material, some corroborative reading (e.g., in the Bible and Cavalier poets), and readings in modern critics of Milton. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 436 Satire and Sentiment, 1660–1800 [3]

Detailed study of the poetry and prose of such writers as Dryden, Behn, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Sterne and Austen, with emphasis on the relations of these writers to the literary, social, political and philosophical questions of their day. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 437 Eighteenth-Century British Novel [3]

A study of the emergence and development of the novel in 18th-century Britain, with particular attention to writers such as Behn, Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Sterne and Austen. Emphasis on the novel’s relationship to other literary forms and on its negotiation of gender and class issues. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 438 The Romantic Movement in Britain [3]

Detailed study of the poetry and prose of such writers as Blake, Wollstonecraft, Coleridge, Austen, the Wordsworths, Byron, the Shelleys and Keats. Emphasis on the relations of these writers to the literary, social, political and philosophical issues of their day, such as the role of the poet and the language appropriate to poetry, revolution, social justice, the transformative power of the imagination, and women’s education. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

Comparative Literature


ENG 315/ML 315/JS 315 Yiddish Literature in Translation I [3]

An introduction to literature written in Yiddish before 1900, concentrating on the three fathers of Yiddish literature, Mendele Mocher Seforim, Y. L. Peretz and Sholem Aleichem. Included is the 17th-century journal of Gluckel of Hameln, as well as works of the occult. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 316/ML 316/JS 316 Yiddish Literature in Translation II [3]

This course will continue the study of literary forms established by Seforim, Aleichem, and Peretz (The Realistic, The Ironic, The Parodic, etc.), as they appear in the world of such writers as Pinski, Spector, Asch, Reisen, Weissenber, Schneour, Shapiro, Kulback, I. J. Singer, Opatoshu, Bergelson, Glatstein and Grade. Concentration on what are called Yenne Velt stories: those of Jewish fantasy and occult. Proverbs, folk tales, songs and poems will introduce each meeting. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 319/GS 319 The 19th-Century Heroine [3]

A look at the 19th-century literature that centers on women. The course examines the characterization of female protagonists as products of a particular culture and a writer’s own personal artistic vision, particularly as these relate to concepts of the heroic. A variety of writers and genres is studied, including classic novels, travel writing, working class and sentimental fictions. Prerequisite: GS 100 or a 200-level literature course, or permission of instructor.

ENG 324W/ML 324W/JS 324W/REL 324W Modern European-Jewish Literature [3]

This class explores the relationship between the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah) and the development of modern Hebrew and Yiddish literature. The readings and class discussions will examine shifting conceptions of Jewish identity; contested notions of Diaspora, Exile, and Home; the relationship between Jewish politics and art; and the tension between the particularity of the national experience and the universality of the Jew. Readings by masters of 19th and 20th century European Jewish fiction will include S.Y. Abramovitch (Mendele Mocher Seforim), known as the “grandfather” of Yiddish literature; Sholem Aleichem’s humorous tales of Eastern Europe; the folk stories of Y.L. Peretz; Kafka’s modernist parables; Isaac Babel’s passionate narratives of the Russian revolution; I.B. Singer’s tales of demons and sinners; and other. This course fulfills the writing intensive guideline and literature requirements for the Judaic Studies major.

ENG 326/ITA 430 Dante’s Divine Comedy [3]

Reading and study of Dante’s masterpiece in English translation, with special emphasis on elements of narrative structure and the nature of Dante’s allegory. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 328/GS 328 Studies in Women’s Writings [3]

An analysis of the range and complexity of women’s literary output, including topics like the historical development of women’s writing, the literary achievements of a single author or a group of authors, theoretical issues pertinent to women’s literary creation, and issues of female creativity. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: Any 200-level literature course and GS 100, or permission of instructor.

ENG 329 Contemporary Fiction [3]

Reading and discussion of innovative prose writers of the present, such as Barth, Coetzee, Pynchon, Atwood, Coover, Didion, Nabokov, Rushdie, Naipaul, Carver, Amis, Smith, and others. Emphasis on the fictional versions of the modern world that engage our master storytellers. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 340/REL 231 Myth, Legend, and Folklore [3]

Examines myths, legends, and folktales, oral and written, and their influence in forming cultures in Europe and the Americas. The particular cultural contexts will vary according to the instructor. Students will learn a range of critical methods to apply to this varied material. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 341/JS 341/REL 341 The Bible and Literature [3]

Reading and discussion of the Bible and selected works of literature focusing on recurring themes, forms, imagery and symbolism. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 342/REL 233 Greek and Roman Classics in Translation [3]

Reading and discussion of selected Greco-Roman literature, including the myths, legends, epics, lyrics, tragedies, comedies, romances and satire of the classical world. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 343 Medieval Literature in Translation [3]

Reading and discussion of major narrative works of the Middle Ages, in modern English translations, illustrating the varying treatments of important recurrent themes: representative texts such as Beowulf, The Phoenix, The Song of Roland, The Romance of the Rose, Niebelungenlied, Njal’s Saga, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Pearl. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 347/ML 347 Modern European Literature: 1920 to the Present [3]

A comparative study of major modern European writers, such as Kafka, Camus, Sartre, Mann and Beckett. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 348/DRA 348 Modern Drama: Realism and Naturalism [3]

Introduction to literature of the modern theater. Playwrights such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Wilde, Shaw, Synge and O’Neill are studied against the background of contemporary intellectual currents and literary trends. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 349/DRA 349 Modern and Contemporary Drama [3]

Playwrights such as Pirandello, Anouilh, Brecht, Ionesco, Genet, Beckett, Pinter and Miller are read with special attention given to experiments in dramatic forms. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 368/DRA 362 The Development of Theatre [3]

This course focuses on crucial moments in the development of theatre as an art form, paying special attention to the origin and development of various theatrical forms and texts. The history of the art of acting, directing, theatre architecture, scenic lighting, costume design and playwriting is investigated. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 370/GS 370 Gay and Lesbian Literature [3]

There is little consensus as to what exactly counts as gay and lesbian literature, whether it is literature by gays and lesbians, literature about gay and lesbian characters and themes, or literature that gay and lesbian people read. This course examines literature that might be considered part of a gay and lesbian “canon” and contemporary works that reveal current directions of gay and lesbian writing. Prerequisites: Any 200-level literature course and GS 100, or permission of instructor.

ENG 421 Literature for the Adolescent Reader [3]

Reading and discussion of literature appealing to, or written for, adolescents and young adults. Various genres will be studied: poetry, drama, short stories, novel and essay. (State certification requirement for secondary school teachers of English.) Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

Literary Criticism


ENG 262 Approaches to Poetry [3]

An intensive study of the forms, conventions, and techniques of poetry to develop the student’s critical sensibilities through close, analytical reading and discussion of poems over a broad range of periods, authors and themes.

ENG 461/ML 461 Theories of Literary Criticism [3]

Study of major critical theories and techniques of literary criticism. Readings in significant modern literary critics and practical application of their methods. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

Creative Writing


ENG 225W Introduction to Creative Writing [3]

A workshop course that introduces students to basic techniques in the writing of short fiction, poetry, drama, and autobiography. Weekly assignments focus on developing skill in such elements of creative writing as character development, plot, dialogue, metaphor and image and versification, among others. Reading of both student work and published work will provide a basis for discussion and practice of technique in this course. Completion of this course enables students to register for upper-division writing seminars in fiction, poetry, playwriting and the personal essay. Prerequisites: RPW 110 and 111. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 310W Creative Writing: Poetry [3]

Intensive practice in writing of poetry in a workshop setting. May be elected for credit more than once with written permission of department chair. Prerequisite: ENG 225W or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 311W Creative Writing: Fiction [3]

Intensive practice in writing of fiction in a workshop setting. May be elected for credit more than once with written permission of department chair. Prerequisite: ENG 225W or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 312W Writing for Publication [3]

Advanced work in nonfiction writing, especially the writing of magazine articles, reviews and feature stories. Prerequisites: RPW 110, 111, and RPW 210W; or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

DRA 313W/ENG 313W Playwriting [3]

This course offers the opportunity to experiment with playwriting techniques in a workshop environment. The basic components of playwriting are taught, focusing particularly on character, dialogue and plot. Students analyze plays from the standpoint of structure and take the opportunity to view and discuss local live performances. Seminars involve the workshop testing of student writing, focusing on further development of the work. It is intended that weekly writing exercises will culminate in a longer piece of work performed in a series of rehearsed readings. Prerequisite: ENG 225W or DRA 160, or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 317W/CMM 317W/PTW 317W Creative Nonfiction [3]

This advanced prose-writing course explores the development of a personal narrative voice through the blending of journalistic and fictional techniques. Prerequisites: RPW 110 and 111, or permission of instructor. CMM 250 recommended. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 333W Studies in Creative Writing [3]

Upper-level studies in a variety of creative writing practices. Upper-level studies include the use of forms in poetry, experimental structures in fiction and essays, and the study of thematic and technical development of longer pieces in all genres. Since the subject will vary semester to semester, this course may be elected for credit more than once with the permission of department chair. Prerequisite: ENG 225W.

ENG 335W Writing as a Self-Creative Process [3]

A composing and critiquing workshop with daily writing assignments. The emphasis is on writing as self-discovery and self-creation. Students work out in their own terms what it means to act as composers of their own reality through language—that is, their conceptions of their world and self. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 410W The Art of the Personal Essay [3]

This course examines the evolution of the essay, from its origins with Montaigne to its prominence as a form of modern writing. In examining the literary history of the essay, the course also serves as a writing workshop. Prerequisites: RPW 210W and 212, or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 415W Advanced Poetry Workshop [3]

An intensive, graduate-style writing workshop for advanced poetry writers, particularly those preparing a portfolio with which to apply to graduate programs in creative writing and those seeking publication in literary journals. Emphasis is on writing and revising poems and on in-depth workshop response to peer work. In addition to the practical study of poetry writing, the course includes significant focus on a chronologically organized exploration of theories of poetry, beginning with the 16th century. Admission to the course requires the submission of a poetry sample (five pages) to the instructor or the director of creative writing. Prerequisites: ENG 225W, ENG 310W, and permission of the instructor. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 425W Advanced Fiction Workshop [3]

This workshop is an intensive, graduate-style writing workshop for advanced fiction writers, particularly those who are preparing a portfolio with which to apply to graduate school in creative writing and those ready to seek publication in literary journals. Emphasis is on writing and revising short stories and on in-depth workshop response to stories written by others in the group. Students admitted to the class should expect to submit a new draft of a story every other week and to prepare written responses to stories by others for each class meeting. Research and discussion of current literary journals and publications therein are included. Submission of at least one piece to a literary journal by the end of the course is required. Admission to this course requires the submission of a fiction writing sample (5–10 pages) to the instructor or the director of creative writing. Prerequisites: ENG 225W, ENG 311W, and permission of the instructor.

ENG 462 Literary Editing and Publishing: Aerie Internship [3]

Offered in the fall semester, a survey of current literary magazine publishing and contemporary literary magazines, as well as application of such publishing practices in a supervised in-house internship with a magazine, Aerie. Includes solicitation of creative work, reading and ranking submissions, compilation of a collection for publication, and editing and proofreading the collection. Prerequisites: ENG 225W, ENG 226W, and permission of the instructor.

Film Studies


ENG 253/CIN 253 Shakespeare on Film: Plays to 1600 [3]

A close study of the transformation into film of dramas of Shakespeare written chiefly before 1600 (first semester), including The Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar and Henry V. Film fee.

ENG 254/CIN 254 Shakespeare on Film: Plays after 1600 [3]

A close study of the transformation into film of dramas of Shakespeare written chiefly after 1600 (second semester), including Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth and Anthony and Cleopatra. Film fee.

Language Studies


ENG 359/RPW 359 Contemporary English Grammar [3]

Grammatical structures and the application of grammar to prose writing, with emphasis on stylistic study, syntactic arrangement and semantic meaning. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENG 390–397 Special Topics in Language and Literature [all 3]

Studies in varied literary topics of special or timely importance not ordinarily examined in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENG 452 History of the English Language [3]

The history and development of the English language, Indo-European origins, the evolution of the language from the earliest periods to the present. Studies in etymology, phonetics and historical linguistics with supplementary readings illustrating the language through its successive stages of development. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

Rhetoric and Professional Writing


RPW 110 Rhetoric and Writing I [3]

Introduces students to the complex practices of writing, reading, and thinking required in many university courses. Students learn to approach writing as a process of invention, drafting, revising, and editing. The course also emphasizes the rhetorical aspects of writing, such as audience, arrangement, and academic conventions. Students learn to read diverse texts critically by practicing close-reading strategies, such as high-lighting, annotating, and double-entry note taking. Students should become more confident and competent at understanding the positions of others as well as asserting their own informed perspectives. Designated sections of the course require additional work on basic skills. This course may not be elected on a Pass/No Pass basis. Laboratory fee.

RPW 111 Rhetoric and Writing II [3]

Emphasizes close reading, analytical writing, and critical thinking that are fundamental for many upper-level courses. Building upon the abilities introduced in RPW 110, critical thinking is taught as students learn to examine multiple perspectives, to analyze an argument, to find and evaluate sources (print and digital), and to present a persuasive viewpoint. As students assert their informed perspectives, they learn to engage with the words and ideas of others without compromising their academic integrity. A primary goal of the course is for students to learn to participate fully in scholarly discourses and debates. Designated sections of this course require additional work in basic skills. This course may not be elected on a Pass/No Pass basis. Prerequisite: RPW 110. Laboratory fee.

RPW 210 Foundations of Argument [3]

This foundation course in critical thinking allows students to sharpen their abilities to form and present clear, reasoned opinions. Students will analyze discourse, texts, and images to comprehend the arguments they are making; identify and evaluate the assumptions, evidence, and rhetorical strategies on which arguments are based; understand the major components of inductive and deductive reasoning; evaluate the relationships between premises and conclusions while recognizing major fallacies; and make reasoned judgments about an argument’s validity and potential consequences. No credit for RPW 210 will be given to students who have credit for RPW 111. Prerequisite: RPW 110. Laboratory fee.

RPW 211W Introduction to Business and Management Communication [3]

This course prepares students to meet diverse business and professional communication needs of the contemporary workplace. Learning and performing business communication functions in a workshop setting, students build on a range of existing and new problem-solving, communication, management, and collaboration skills. To further refine an understanding of these skills, students complete projects around real-world and simulated problems, including a problem report, a grant proposal, and a business plan. Prerequisite: RPW 110 or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 215W Introduction to Professional Writing [3]

This course provides an introduction to the practice of writing in the workplace by bringing together fragments of our talents (what we know, what we can do, what interests us) in order to do the work of professional writers. Students study the language of online and print technical communication; discuss ethical problems in professional communication settings; and examine storyboards, proposals and reports, websites, charts and graphs, marketing materials, and other professional documents with a sharpened rhetorical sensitivity. Students engage in intensive practice of writing individual and collaborative documents for business and industry, including memos, letters, proposals, reports, procedures, descriptions, research designs, and basic HTML. Prerequisite: RPW 110 or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 245W Critical Literacy [3]

Teaches students to think critically about literacy itself. The course examines the implications of changing definitions of reading and writing by placing literacy in a historical context. The social as well as the cognitive effects of reading and writing are studied by locating literacy in various academic and cultural contexts. Other issues include visual and digital literacies as well as students’ own literacy practices. The course may be taken as a requirement of the Rhetoric and Professional Writing major and/or as a writing-intensive course for any student in the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite: RPW 110. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 251W/GS 251W Rhetorics of Gender Activism [3]

If, as Aristotle claims, rhetoric is the study of the available means of persuasion, then it seems imperative that rhetoric turn its attention to the ways in which activists concerned with issues of gender and sexuality have sought to enact social and political change in a range of contexts throughout history. This course applies rhetorical analysis to essays, speeches, documentary films, visual media, and artifacts from activist organizations, all in an effort to understand better the techniques that gender activists use to mobilize, to challenge, and to create change. Prerequisites: RPW 110 and GS 100, or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 312W Reports, Proposals, and Grants [3]

Whether in corporations, nonprofit, government, or other workplace settings, employees spend much of their time writing reports, proposals, and/or grants. This intermediate-level course teaches the mechanics of writing in these genres and explores the social and political aspects of such writing. Students examine how to conduct research for these genres and tailor such writing for particular audiences by creating several informal and formal projects. Prerequisite: RPW 211W or RPW 215W, or permission of instructor.

RPW 316W Collaborative Writing in the Workplace [3]

Studies show that professional and technical writers collaborate 75 percent of their work time, and industry spends $3 billion annually to retrain employees to engage in collaborative composing processes. This course examines professional and technical writing as a collaborative, rather than an individual, process. Topics include theories of collaboration (horizontal and vertical), information development, document cycling, project management, and concepts of authorship. Students lead, as well as engage in, collaborative writing teams on such topics as employee assessment, procedural guidelines, product design, and project proposals. Prerequisite: RPW 211 or RPW 215; or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 340W/GS 340W Writing in Gender-Based Activist Organizations [3]

Focusing on issues such as reproductive rights, health care, and domestic violence, students examine the ways in which activist organizations that are focused on issues of gender and sexuality write about controversial issues for a range of audiences and in response to a variety of situations: guest speakers and working documents from actual reports, press releases, website content, and other written texts. Prerequisites: RPW 110, or GS 100, and junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 359/ENG 359 Contemporary English Grammar [3]

Grammatical structures and application of grammar to prose writing, with emphasis on stylistic study, syntactic arrangement, and semantic meaning. Prerequisite: Any 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

RPW 370W Foundations of Rhetoric [3]

The aim of this course is to introduce key historical figures who made, and the current central scholars who are making, contributions to the study of rhetoric. We read primary texts selected from classical rhetoric, modern rhetoric, post-modern rhetoric, and alternative rhetoric(s). We define rhetoric in the traditional sense and study how this definition has changed to include contemporary problems of electronic texts and visual displays of information. Prerequisite: RPW 210W or RPW 215W, or permission of instructor. (Writing-intensive course) Laboratory fee.

RPW 375 Professional Editing [3]

This course focuses on print and online editing, including the use of traditional proofreading marks and online techniques, document layout and design, principles of copywriting, and the study of style manuals. The course follows two lines of study: one of editing/text-crunching practices and one of print document design principles and practices related to the editing of documents. The cornerstone of the course is producing two client documents, edited according to client preferences. Prerequisite: RPW 210W or RPW 215W, or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee.

RPW 472 Rhetoric and Professional Writing Capstone Course: Portfolio Presentation [3]

A capstone course in which students work individually with faculty advisors to present a portfolio of work submitted, revised, and represented within the rhetoric and professional writing major. Students may elect to include material developed in off-campus writing experiences, including internships, as well as in course work. Each portfolio will be introduced by an essay in which students will situate their work within the theoretical perspectives learned in the program. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the professional and technical writing major.

RPW 480 Internship in Professional Writing [1–3]

Internships allow RPW majors and minors to supplement their classroom work with on-the-job experience in professional and technical writing. Typically, during one semester, interns work off campus several hours each week under the supervision of professionals in their fields. Prerequisites: RPW 215W, one 300- or 400-level RPW course, and junior or senior standing.

RPW 481, 482, 483 Independent Study in Rhetoric and Professional Writing [1–3]

Individual work in professional and technical writing with faculty supervision. By special arrangement only. Prerequisites: RPW 215W, one 300- or 400-level course, and junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor.

RPW 290, 291, 390, 391, 490, 491 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Professional Writing [3–4]

Courses in this category focus on the theories and practices of rhetoric and professional writing encompassed by this department. While the subject matter of special topics courses including such material as rhetorical theory, evolving technologies of writing, and digital literacies varies significantly, all courses provide an intensive focus on important historical and contemporary issues in the fields of rhetoric and professional writing, with an eye to exploring the practical implications of particular theoretical perspectives. Laboratory fee.

Special Courses


ENG 200 Cooperative Education Program [variable]

Paid work experience involving writing/researching skills in a business setting. Objectives and evaluation criteria are set up by a learning contract under the supervision of the department’s co-op/internship coordinator. Pass/No Pass grading. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and 2.5 GPA. May be elected for credit more than once, up to a limit of 15 credits, with written permission of the department.

ENG 226W Sophomore Seminar in English [3]

This seminar introduces English majors to the interdisciplinary nature of literary study. Though its subject varies, the seminar includes a variety of texts and explores various theoretical approaches to their interpretation. Students have opportunities both to consider the broad social, political, and philosophical implications of different critical theories and to engage in the practical work of applying those theories to their reading of literature. The seminar is designed to teach students basic skills of literary research, including how to use such bibliographical tools as the online version of the MLA Bibliography, how to find and procure journal articles and scholarly books, and how to format a research paper in accordance with MLA style. It also provides experience in reading scholarly articles and familiarity with academic literary discourse. Students explore various critical theories in short writing assignments, sometimes assessing the argument of a theoretically informed essay on a literary text, sometimes applying a particular critical theory in a close textual analysis of literary work. Oral as well as written presentation is stressed. Students demonstrate their knowledge of basic research skills by completing a final research paper of 8–12 pages. Prerequisite: For English majors and minors only, or by permission of instructor.

ENG 380, 381 Independent Study [1–3]

An independent study project conducted under the direction of a willing faculty mentor. Independent study may be elected for 1, 2, or 3 credits, depending on the nature and scope of the project. Majors must reach agreement with the faculty mentor about the requirements for successful completion of the independent study before enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENG 465W The Capstone Course [3]

The course focuses on a special topic of literary studies (Detective Fiction, Hypertext, Marlowe and Shakespeare, Theories of Creativity), reintroduces literary theory, and helps students to put together a portfolio of their best writing. The first two objectives are met through informal lecture and discussion, and the last through a workshop atmosphere in which students read and criticize each other’s portfolio entries. This is a course primarily for graduating senior English majors for whom it is a requirement. Typically, the fall capstone focuses on literature and the spring capstone on creative writing. Prerequisites: Senior standing and at least 12 credit hours in English, including ENG 226W. (Writing-intensive course)

ENG 490 English Internship Program [1–3]

Internships allow English majors and minors to supplement their classroom work with on-the-job experience in journalism, editing, public relations and related fields. Typically, during one semester interns work off campus several hours each week under the supervision of professionals in their fields. Prospective interns must secure a faculty mentor and must consult that mentor about the requirements of the internship before enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Red Impact Bar