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College of Arts & Sciences

Biology

The Biology department can be reached at 860.768.4531

BIO 110 General Biology

4 credits
BIO 110 considers the following topics in a broad, general survey for the nonmajor: the cellular nature and energy requirements of plants and animals; evolution; genetics; species interaction; ecology. The laboratory is correlated with the lecture. Credit toward a biology major or minor by permission only.
Laboratory fee.

7/11-8/1736597TR12:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.D 4194Sanchez-Blano
7/11-8/17 LAB36598TR9:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.BC 1620Staff

BIO 122 Introductory Biology I

4 credits
An introduction to biology focusing on biochemistry, cell biology, cellular energy production, cell division, genetics, and molecular biology. The course emphasizes underlying principles, particularly chemical principles. Laboratories are integrated with lecture materials.
Corequisite: either CH 110 or CH 111 or CH 114 or CH 136 or permission of instructor.
Laboratory fee.

5/23-6/2936528TR9:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.D 4214Zhu
5/23-6/29 LAB36529TR1:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.BC 1620Staff

BIO 123 Introductory Biology II

4 credits
An introduction to biology focusing on evolution, phylogeny, selected topics in botany, and animal physiology. Plant and animal topics emphasize underlying evolutionary principles. Laboratories are integrated with lecture materials.
Corequisite: Either CH 110 or CH 111 or CH 114 or CH 136 or permission of instructor.
Laboratory fee.

5/23-6/2937238TR10:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.D 2024Frankel
5/23-6/29 LAB37239TR1:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.BC 1660Staff

BIO 130 Introduction to Environmental Science

4 credits
This course introduces fundamental principles, concepts, and methodologies of environmental science from an interdisciplinary approach. Both local and global environmental issues are explored from ecological, social, economic, and governmental policy perspectives. Students gain an understanding of the basic scientific methods, tools and techniques needed to understand and analyze environmental issues including population growth, water quality, air pollution, environmental toxicology, waste management, climate change, biodiversity, renewable energy and sustainability. A two and half hour laboratory each week is required in addition to the lecture. Students are required to make several field trips to environmental sites and conduct indoor and outdoor experiments as part of this course and write a term paper dealing with a current environmental issue.
Laboratory fee.

5/22-6/5 37631MWF9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.D 4214Zhu
5/22-6/5 LAB37631MTWRF12:30 p.m. - 3:59 p.m.BC 1790Zhu

BIO 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

4 credits
A study of human tissues and organ systems.: muscular, skeletal, nervous, and endocrine systems; skin and special senses. Laboratory dissection and physiology experimentation are coordinated with lecture material. This course is for health science students and it is recommended that they be taken in order.
Co/Prerequisite(s): CH 114 and CH 136, or CH 110-CH 111.
Laboratory fee.

5/23-6/2936005TR1:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.D 4194Bhushan
5/23-6/29 LAB36006TR10:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.BC 1510Staff
5/23-6/29 LAB36338TR4:15 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.BC 1510Staff

BIO 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

4 credits
A study of human tissues and organ systems:  circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems; blood and metabolism. Laboratory dissection and physiology experimentation are coordinated with lecture material. This course is for health science students and it is recommended that they be taken in order.
Co/Prerequisite(s): CH 114 and CH 136, or CH 110-CH 111.
Laboratory fee.

7/11-8/1736007TR4:20 p.m. - 7:05 p.m.D 3094Borucinska
7/11-8/17 LAB36008TR7:10 p.m. - 9:55 p.m.BC 1510Staff
7/11-8/17 LAB36897TR1:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.BC 1510Staff

BIO 272W Genetics

3 credits
A study of the gene, its structure, control, and role in determining the chemical and physical characteristics of cells and individuals. Analysis of Mendelian ratios and chromosome maps.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 122 and either CH 110 and CH 111 or CH 114 and CH 136

5/23-6/2937144TR10:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.D 2053Bhushan

BIO 440 Medical Microbiology

4 credits
A concept-based approach to microbiology for allied health profession students. Topics include humanmicrobe interactions; the control of microbial growth by physical and chemical methods and antimicrobial agents; an introduction to immunology and the host response to infectious disease; biological tools for diagnosing infectious disease–causing pathogenic microbes; and a survey of infectious diseases, including causative microbe, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture materials, with a focus on pathogen diagnosis. Designed for students in the ClinicalLaboratory Science, Health Science General Studies, Physical Therapy, and Respiratory Care/Therapy programs. Medical Microbiology does not fulfill upper-division course requirements for biology B.S. majors. No credit given to students who have received credit for BIO 442.
Prerequisite(s): One year of chemistry: either CH 110 and CH 111 or CH 114 and CH 136; BIO 272W; and 8 additional credits in biology.
Laboratory fee.

5/23-6/2937194TR9:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.D 4114Silver
5/23-6/29 LAB37195TR1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.BC 1520Silver

BIO 755 Neurologic Assessment

3 credits
An introduction to and review of those procedures, both invasive and noninvasive, that are diagnostic in evaluating a broad range of neurological syndromes.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 520 and BIO 744.

5/22-7/336735MW12:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.D 2323Brunquell

Chemistry

The chemistry department can be reached at 860.768.4531

CH 110 College Chemistry

4 credits
Basic principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular theory and structure; the chemical and physical behavior of gases, solids, liquids, and solutions; chemical equations; thermochemistry; chemical equilibrium; acid-base theory; electrochemistry; kinetics; nuclear chemistry; metal complexes; and an introduction to inorganic and organic chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to acquaint students with quantitative measurements as applied to chemical behavior. For science, engineering, and mathematics majors. One three-hour laboratory in addition to lecture.
Prerequisite(s): Working knowledge of algebra and logarithms.
Laboratory fee.

5/22-7/335542MTWR1:30 p.m. - 3:05 p.mD 2024Mahan
5/22-7/3 LAB35541MW3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.BC 2650Roberts
5/22-7/3 LAB38762MW9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.BC 2650Roberts
5/22-6/2937065MTWR10:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.D 4194Craft

CH 111 College Chemistry II

4 credits
Basic principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular theory and structure; the chemical and physical behavior of gases, solids, liquids, and solutions; chemical equations; thermochemistry; chemical equilibrium; acid-base theory; electrochemistry; kinetics; nuclear chemistry; metal complexes; and an introduction to inorganic and organic chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to acquaint students with quantitative measurements as applied to chemical behavior. For science, engineering, and mathematics majors. One three-hour laboratory in addition to lecture.
Prerequisite(s): Working knowledge of algebra and logarithms.  CH 110.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/1735611MTWR1:30 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.D 4214Mahan
7/10-8/1737089MTWR10:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.D 4194Scarlett
5/22-7/337533MTWR10:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.UT 3034Scarlett
7/10-8/16 LAB36387MW9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.mBC 2650Roberts
7/10-8/16 LAB35610MW3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.BC 2650Roberts
5/22-7/3 LAB37534MW1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.BC 2630Roberts

CH 230 Organic Chemistry

4 credits
Fundamentals of structure and reactions of carbon compounds. Emphasis on reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereochemistry, and chemical and spectroscopic methods of analysis. One three hour laboratory in addition to lecture.
Prerequisite(s): CH 111 or equivalent.
Laboratory fee.

5/22-7/337364MTWR10:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.D 2024Mahan
5/22-7/3 LAB35825MW1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.BC 2530Roberts
5/22/-7/3 LAB37048MW5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.BC 2530Roberts

CH 231 Organic Chemistry

4 credits
Fundamentals of structure and reactions of carbon compounds. Emphasis on reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereochemistry, and chemical and spectroscopic methods of analysis. One three hour laboratory in addition to lecture.
Prerequisite(s): CH 111 or equivalent.  CH 230.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/1735856MTWR10:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m.D 4214Mahan
7/10-8/16 LAB35857MW1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.BC 2530Roberts
7/10-8/16 LAB37049MW5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.BC 2530Roberts

Cinema

The cinema department can be reached at 860.768.5544.

CIN 150 Introduction to Film

3 credits
Course Cross-listed with CMM 150
Study of cinema as a cultural and artistic form. Emphasis on techniques (camera, editing, color, sound, composition) and styles (realism, expressionism, abstraction).
Film fee.

5/22-6/2937344OnlineOnlineOnline3Symons

Communications

The School of Communication can be reached at 860.768.4633.

CMM 110 Communication in the Digital Age

3 credits
The primary goal of the course is to provide students with an overview of the foundations and breadth of the field of Communication. A particular focus is placed on the role that technology plays in the major areas of the field – human communication studies, media and journalism, and advertising and public relations. The course also addresses ethical dilemmas in communication such as deception, manipulation, and others. Students are required to engage in critical thinking, analysis, presentation, and application utilizing concepts addressed in the course.

5/22-7/1536397Distance LearningTBAOnline3Duran

CMM 115 Improving Communication Skills

3 credits
Designed to help students develop skill and confidence in two speaking contexts: dyadic and public speaking. Course emphasizes self-assessment, adaptation to listeners and situations, organization and support of ideas, and effective delivery. (Does not fulfill requirements for the communication major.)

5/23-6/2936217TR5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.HJG E2283Schermerhorn

CMM 150 Introduction to Film

Course Cross-listed with CIN 150
3 credits
Study of cinema as an art form. Emphasis on techniques (editing, color, sound, composition) and styles (realism, expressionism, impressionism, abstraction).
Film fee.

5/22-6/2937344OnlineOnlineOnline3Symons

CMM 210 Media Literacy

3 credits
This course introduces students to critical engagement with media. Students learn how to analyze and critique major themes in news and entertainment media, and how to evaluate and participate in media activism. Issues in media economics are examined, and students gain expertise in constructing a World Wide Web presence.

5/22-6/2937198Distance LearningTBAOnline3Schermerhorn

CMM 225W Interpersonal Communication

3 credits
Introduces students to major variables affecting the process of communication, including self-awareness, self-concept, perception, language, self-disclosure, nonverbal communication, empathic listening, and defensiveness. Major theories of interpersonal communication are discussed.
Prerequisite(s): CMM 110.

5/22-6/2936880Distance LearningTBAOnline3Ott

CMM 240 Introduction to Media

3 credits
Survey of the development, uses, economics, and content of communication media. Traditional mass media (broadcast, film, cable television, print), as well as the more interactive and micro media (Internet and digital media), are explored.

5/22-6/2936732Distance LearningTBAOnline3Banks

CMM 251 Nonverbal Communication

3 credits
Survey of the theoretical and empirical literature dealing with selected areas of nonverbal communication, e.g., space and territory relationships, physical characteristics, and vocal cues. Takes a developmental perspective, examining the communicative aspects of nonverbal behavior from infancy to adulthood.
Prerequisite(s): CMM 110 and CMM 225W.

5/22-7/1537197Distance LearningTBAOnline3Duran

CMM 253W Writing for the Media

3 credits
Introduction to the techniques and principles of writing for three major areas of the media: print and broadcast news, advertising, and public relations. Writing intensive
Prerequisite(s): WRT 110.
Laboratory fee $40.00

5/22-7/1737722Distance LearningTBAOnline3Chiara, A

CMM 406 Internship Program

3-6 credit(s)
The internship program is intended to provide students an opportunity to augment their studies with a 12- to 15-week work experience in an organization engaged in communication-related activities (marketing, public relations, advertising, broadcasting, etc.). Typically, students work from 7 to 15 hours each week. Depending upon a School of Communication major’s chosen emphasis, either 3 or 6 hours of internship credit is the maximum allowable toward completion of the major. Additional details about the program are available on request from the director of internships.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

5/22-6/2935551TBATBATBA3-6Desmond

CMM 407 Internship Program

3-6 credits
The internship program is intended to provide students an opportunity to augment their studies with a 12- to 15-week work experience in an organization engaged in communication-related activities (marketing, public relations, advertising, broadcasting, etc.). Typically, students work from 7 to 15 hours each week. Depending upon a School of Communication major’s chosen emphasis, either 3 or 6 hours of internship credit is the maximum allowable toward completion of the major. Additional details about the program are available on request from the director of internships.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of internship director.

5/22-6/2935937TBATBATBA3-6Desmond

CMM 520 Organizational Communication

3 credits
This course covers the major approaches to the study of organizational communication. The course also covers relevant aspects of management theory, the sociology of complex organizations, and organizational psychology as they apply to communicative behavior. Topics include superior-subordinate communication, openness, and communication climate.
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

7/10-8/27 37452Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Kovacic

Computer Science

The Computer Science department can be reached at 860.768.4306

CS 110 Introduction to Computers

3 credits
This course is a broad introduction to the use of computers as tools for creativity, problem solving, communications, and organizing information. Topics include the hardware components of a computer, the fundamentals of operating systems, ethical use of computers, and web creation and information security. Students acquire valuable hands-on skills in four application areas: word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, and Internet communication software. Previous computer experience is not expected. Not open to students who have completed a higher-level CS course.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/1735587Distance LearningTBAOnline3Rosiene

CS 111 Programming Foundations

3 credits
An introductory computer programming course designed for students with no prior programming background. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and the translation of solutions into a programming language. Topics include data types, input/output, control structures, loop structures, and program modularity. This course may be used to prepare the student with no prior programming experience for CS 114 or as a one-semester exposure to programming.
Prerequisite(s): (1) Two years of high school algebra with an average grade of at least B and (2) a high school computer course or CS 110. Not open to students who have completed a higher level CS course.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/1736515Distance LearningTBAOnline3Rosiene

CS 114 Fundamentals of Computing I

4 credits
This is the first course of a two-semester introductory sequence, with laboratory, that covers the fundamentals of algorithmic problem solving. The course emphasizes general programming methodology and concepts common to object-oriented and procedural programming languages: algorithms, top-down structured program design, modularity, efficiency, testing and debugging, and user-friendliness. The object-oriented paradigm is covered, including classes, objects, access control, abstraction, and encapsulation. Other topics include organization and hardware, input and output, subprogram units (methods), fundamental data types, reference types, control structures including conditions and iteration, and arrays.
Prerequisite(s): M 110, M 140, or equivalent.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/1737199Distance LearningTBAOnline4Rosiene

English

The English department can be reached at 860.768.4315

ENG 140 Introduction to Literature

3 credits
Focusing on a set of literary readings different with each section of the course, students examine the nature of literary discourse, as well as perennial and contemporary issues, pleasures, and problems raised by the writing and reading of all literary texts. The course equips students to engage a variety of texts subsequently, in and out of courses, in literature and life.

6/12-8/636398Distance LearningTBAOnline3Ealy

ENG 225W Introduction to Creative Writing

3 credits Writing Intensive
The course will introduce students to the fundamental craft issues involved in producing and editing works of short fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.  We will learn the conventions of each genre, read examples, write ourselves, and respond to each other's work.  Weekly assignments will focus on developing skill in such elements of creative writing as character development, plot, dialogue, metaphor, image, and the poetic line.  Students will be assigned a minimum of 25 pages of graded writing, including writing exercises, revisions, and peer review. Completion of this course enables students to register for upper-division writing seminars in fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative non-fiction.  Writing Intensive.

6/12-8/635909Distance LearningTBAOnline3Grossberg

Gender Studies

The Department of Gender Studies can be reached at 860.768.4132

GS 100 Introduction to Gender Studies

3 credits
This course explores a range of theoretical approaches to the study of gender, laying the foundation for the major and minor in gender studies. Students examine and critically analyze gender theory and its sources. The course approaches gender as a fundamental category of analysis, with careful attention paid to the intersection of race and class. Its emphasis on theory that is anchored in both the humanities and the social sciences prepares students for subsequent gender studies courses, including those exploring the most recent scholarship coming out of queer theory, masculinity, and sexualities.

7/10-8/17 36516TBATBAOnline3Miceli

GS 450 Internship in Gender Studies

3 credits
This course explores a range of theoretical approaches to the study of gender, laying the foundation for the major and minor in gender studies. Students examine and critically analyze gender theory and its sources. The course approaches gender as a fundamental category of analysis, with careful attention paid to the intersection of race and class. Its emphasis on theory that is anchored in both the humanities and the social sciences prepares students for subsequent gender studies courses, including those exploring the most recent scholarship coming out of queer theory, masculinity, and sexualities.

5/22-7/336012TBATBATBA3Staff
7/10-8/1736014TBATBATBA3Staff

GS 451 Independent Study in Gender Studies

3 credits
Guided by a faculty supervisor, the independent study serves as an integrative, culminating experience on a subject of particular interest to the student. The project typically culminates in a scholarly composition. Student meets regularly with a faculty supervisor to discuss scholarly progress, including, but not limited to, bibliography, thesis, research methodology, theoretical approach, and writing. Students submit regular written progress reports.

5/22-7/336013TBATBATBA3Staff
7/10-8/1736015TBATBATBA3Staff

History

The History department can be reached at 860.768.4234

HIS 100 Civilization since 1500: Making the World Modern

3 credits
A study of the changing human experience with civilization during the formation of the modern world: the dynamics of economic, intellectual, political, and social modernization, and the dissolution of traditional civilization in the world. This course fulfills a general education requirement.

5/22-6/536881MTWRF10:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.H 3123Rosenthal

HIS 229 The Holocaust

Course Cross-listed with JS 229/POL 279
3 credits
This course includes interdisciplinary lectures, readings, and discussions of the roots, details, and consequences of the Holocaust. We will explore historical, intellectual, moral, political, legal, and psychological dimensions of the Holocaust as a phenomenon of its own and as an aspect of genocide.

5/22-6/538437 MTWRF2:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.H 4013Rosenthal

HIS 306 Archaeology of the Land of Israel

Course Cross-listed with JS 306 / POL 376 / SOC 306
3 credits
This course provides students with an overview of the chronological and cultural structure of the archaeological periods from the third millennium through the Byzantine period, with emphasis on the Roman and Byzantine eras. The course includes fieldwork in Israel, lectures, workshops on material culture, museum tours, and field trips. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. Beyond these required activities, a primary objective of the course is a research paper to be completed during the spring or summer following the return to the United States. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture. All students complete field and class work for both courses.

5/22-6/538710Study AbroadTBATBA3Freund

HIS 307 Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture

Course Cross-listed with JS 306 / POL 376 / SOC 306
3 credits
This course provides students with an overview of the chronological and cultural structure of the archaeological periods from the third millennium through the Byzantine period, with emphasis on the Roman and Byzantine eras. The course includes fieldwork in Israel, lectures, workshops on material culture, museum tours, and field trips. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. Beyond these required activities, a primary objective of the course is a research paper to be completed during the spring or summer following the return to the United States. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture. All students complete field and class work for both courses.

7/4-8/135854Study AbroadTBATBA3Freund

Judaic Studies

The Department of Judaic Studies can be reached at 860.768.4964

JS 307 Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture - Lithuania

Course Cross-listed with HIS 307 / POL 377 / SOC 307
3 credits
This course is an introduction to excavation techniques and material culture. It includes principles of excavation and recording, material culture identification/processing, and field-study tours. Early synagogues and church architecture serve as foci for analysis. This course contains a full introduction to the methodology of Near Eastern archaeology from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age, practical instruction in ceramic typology and Semitic inscriptions, and a survey of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine society. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeology of the Land of Israel. All students complete field- and class work for both courses. This course is offered as part of the Archaeological Excavations in Israel, a Winterterm/Summerterm offering.

7/11-8/635854TBATBATBATBAFreund

JS 380 Independent Study in Judaic Studies - Lithuania

1–3 credit(s)
A directed research project, guided by a member of the faculty, designed to give students an opportunity to pursue their own interests in Judaic studies and to gain experience in scholarly research, writing, lecturing, teaching, and criticism. The central effort of the course focuses on the preparation and criticism of individual projects, oral and written.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

7/11-8/635842TBATBATBA1-3Freund
7/11-8/637442TBATBATBA1-3Patt
7/11-8/636357TBATBATBA1-3Staff

JS 425 Contemporary Studies in Jewish Civilization: Archaeology Land of Lithuania

1–3 credit(s)
A directed research project, guided by a member of the faculty, designed to give students an opportunity to pursue their own interests in Judaic studies and to gain experience in scholarly research, writing, lecturing, teaching, and criticism. The central effort of the course focuses on the preparation and criticism of individual projects, oral and written.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

7/11-8/6 (War & Peace part 1)36882MTWRF9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.A 3243Abo Rabia
7/11-8/6 (War & Peace part 2)37091MTWRF1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.A 3223Abo Rabia
7/11-8/6 (Gratz College)36601Distance LearningTBATBA3Staff
07/11-08/639126TBATBATBA3Staff

JS 500 Bible and Archaeology

3 credits
A course to examine a variety of different historical, literary, cultural, legal, and scientific issues in the critical study of Jewish civilization. Students may repeat this course as the topics meet their individual curricular needs.
Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor

7/11-8/635910MTWRFTBATBA3Freund

Mathematics

The Mathematics Department can be reached at 860.768.4306

M 110 Modeling with Elementary Functions

3 credits
A study of linear, quadratic, cubic, exponential, and logistic equations and their use in modeling real-world phenomena; the graphing of functions; solving equations with one or more variables; and systems of linear equations. The solution of word problems is stressed throughout. This course may serve as preparation for M 112 but not for M 144.

5/22-7/335569Distance LearningTBAOnline3Xue

M 114 Everyday Statistics

3 credits
Designed to introduce basic concepts of probability, random sampling, data organization, measures of central tendency and variability, binomial and normal probability distributions, statistical inference, elements of hypothesis testing, one- and two sample tests for means and proportions, chisquare tests for tabular data, an introduction to linear regression and correlation.
Prerequisite(s): Two years of algebra.
Note: TI-84+ graphing calculator or equivalent required.

5/22-6/537237MTWRF 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.D 4193Ryu
5/22-7/336468Distance LearningTBAOnline3McGivney-Burelle
7/10-8/1735787Distance LearningTBAOnline3McGivney-Burelle

M 116 Contemporary Mathematics

3 credits
Designed to introduce basic concepts of probability, random sampling, data organization, measures of central tendency and variability, binomial and normal probability distributions, statistical inference, elements of hypothesis testing, one- and two sample tests for means and proportions, chisquare tests for tabular data, an introduction to linear regression and correlation.
Prerequisite(s): Two years of algebra.
Note: TI-84+ graphing calculator or equivalent required.

5/22-7/335539Distance LearningTBAOnline3McGivney-Burelle

M 140 Precalculus with Trigonometry

4 credits
A study of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; the Cartesian coordinate system for the plane; and the algebra and graphing of functions with special emphasis on polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Definitions and graphs of the trigonometric functions; solutions of triangles; analytic trigonometry, including circular and inverse trigonometric functions. Solutions of word problems are stressed throughout. A programmable graphing calculator is required. The goal is to prepare students for M 144.
Prerequisite(s): Two years of algebra.
Note: TI-89+ graphing calculator or equivalent required.

5/22-7/335911Distance LearningTBAOnline4McGivney-Burelle

M 144 Calculus I

4 credits
Functions; limits; continuity; differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions; applications of derivatives; and an introduction to integration.
Prerequisite(s): M 140 or equivalent.
Note: TI-89+ graphing calculator or equivalent required.

5/23-7/336921TR4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 3094Nanna
5/22-7/337292MW4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 4114Nanna

M 145 Calculus II

4 credits
Techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, and separable differential equations.
Prerequisite(s): M 144.

5/22-7/337164TR4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.UT 3064Hadad
5/22-7/337587TR4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 2054LeMay
5/22-7/335534TR4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 4114Atkinson

M 220 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory

4 credits
Techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, and separable differential equations.
Prerequisite(s): M 144.

5/22-7/337196MW4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.D 2323Wiggins
7/10-8/1735588MW4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.D 2323Wiggins

M 240 Calculus of Several Variables

4 credits
Vectors in three dimensions, curves and parametric equations in three dimensions, geometry of surfaces, differential calculus of functions of more than one variable with applications, multiple integrals and their applications, the differential and integral calculus of vector fields.
Prerequisite(s): M 145.

5/22-7/337275MW4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 2054Uricchio

M 242 Differential Equations

3 credits
Solutions of first-order linear, separable equations and applications; higher-order linear equations and applications. Nonhomogeneous equations; Laplace transforms and initial value problems; matrices, eigenvalues, and linear systems of differential equations. Qualitative analysis of equilibria and bifurcations.
Prerequisite(s): M 145.

5/22-7/337522MW1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.D 4213Mackenzie
5/22-7/335581MW1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. D 3093Atkinson
7/11-8/1737300TR4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.D 2053Benardete

M 366 Engineering Probability and Statistics

3 credits
Solutions of first-order linear, separable equations and applications; higher-order linear equations and applications. Nonhomogeneous equations; Laplace transforms and initial value problems; matrices, eigenvalues, and linear systems of differential equations. Qualitative analysis of equilibria and bifurcations.
Prerequisite(s): M 145.

5/22-7/338814 MW4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.D 2043Yeboah

M 515 Methods Applied Mathematics I

3 credits
Matrix algebra, simultaneous linear equations and numerical methods for their solution, inverses, and determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, canonical forms, matrix norms, algebraic variational methods, functions of matrices. Matrix methods for linear systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE), including the state-transition matrix. Quadratic forms and positive definite matrices; singular value decomposition. Introduction to nonlinear analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate calculus and differential equations.

7/10-8/1639932MW7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.D 2043Martin

Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy can be reached at 860.768.4743.

PHI 110 Introduction to History of Western Philosophy

3 credits
An introduction to philosophical inquiry into the questions that have perennially engaged philosophical thought, through discussion and the writings of philosophers whose thinking illuminates these questions, such as the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; and the significance of social, moral, aesthetics, and religious experience.

5/22-6/536392Distance LearningTBAOnline3Tucker
7/10-8/1736524Distance LearningTBAOnline3Skelly
5/22-6/3035788Distance LearningTBAOnline3Tucker

PHI 230W Ethical Problems

3 credits
An introduction to philosophical inquiry into the questions that have perennially engaged philosophical thought, through discussion and the writings of philosophers whose thinking illuminates these questions, such as the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; and the significance of social, moral, aesthetics, and religious experience.

5/22-7/3 36713Distance LearningTBAOnline3Skelly

PHI 280 Introduction to Eastern Philosophy

3 credits
This course seeks to introduce students to basic issues in Eastern thinking through investigation of the history, philosophical issues, and prominent thinkers in that region of the world. Areas to be explored include Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam and Taoism. By the end of the course, students should possess a fundamental understanding of these faiths and philosophies.
Prerequisite(s): PHI 110.

5/22-7/3 37248Distance LearningTBAOnline3Tucker

PHI 283 Rationalists and Empiricists

3 credits
History of Western philosophy from Francis Bacon (1605) to Immanuel Kant (1804). The rise of the new science and the rationalism of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. The empirical and skeptical thought of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. Kant’s response to the two schools.
Prerequisite(s): PHI 110.

5/22-7/3 37532Distance LearningTBAOnline3Moen

PHI 340 Philosophy of Religion II

This course focuses on philosophy of religion in the 20th century. Various thinkers to be covered include Adams, Plantinga, Hick, Mavrodes, and Swinburne. Topics to be discussed include the nature of evil, religious pluralism, divine attributes, religious ethics, and the relationship between religion and science.
Prerequisite(s): PHI 240 or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/337083Distance LearningTBAOnline3Tucker

Physics

The Physics Department can be reached at 860.768.4306

PHY 112 Calculus-Based Physics I

4 credits
This is the first part of a three-semester course in introductory physics intended for students majoring in the physical sciences or in engineering. The subject matter is the study of Newtonian mechanics.
Prerequisite(s): M 144 (may be taken concurrently).
Laboratory fee.

5/23-7/3 LAB35571TR7:40 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.D 2110Staff
5/23-7/335572TR4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 2044Ritacco
7/10-8/17 LAB37046MW5:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 2110staff
7/10-8/17 37081MW1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.D 2044Wells

PHY 113 Calculus-Based Physics II

4 credits
This is the second part of the three-semester sequence described in PHY 112 . The subject matter includes the study of fluids, heat, mechanical waves, and optics.
Prerequisite(s): PHY 112.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/17 LAB37572TR7:40 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.D 2110Staff
7/10-8/1737571TR4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 2324Ritacco
5/22-7/3 LAB37274MW5:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.D 2110Staff
5/22-7/337093MW12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.D 2054Mohottala

PHY 120 Algebra-Based Physics I

4 credits
This is the first semester of a two-semester course in introductory physics intended for students majoring in the life sciences, technology programs, or preparing for professional schools. The topics include Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, and heat.
Prerequisite(s): Two years of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.
Laboratory fee.

5/22-7/335719MW4:00 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.D 2364McDonald
5/22-7/3 LAB35720MW7:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.D 2360McDonald

PHY 121 Algebra-Based Physics II

4 credits
This is the sequel to PHY 120. The topics include wave motion, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, physics of the atom, and physics of the nucleus.
Prerequisite(s): PHY 120.
Laboratory fee.

7/10-8/1635721MW4:00 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.D 2364McDonald
7/10-8/16 LAB35722MW7:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.D 2260McDonald

PHY 480 Independent Study

1 credit
Provides an opportunity for the student to carry through a project extending over one or two semesters under the direction of a member of the department. Projects are selected by the student and may include areas such as theoretical physics, experimental physics, topical reviews in physics, and topics in the history of science. Emphasis is placed on individual study of the literature and, when appropriate, laboratory work.
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing. The signature of the department chairman is required to register for this course.
Laboratory fee.

5/22-7/1739334TR10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.D 2261McDonald

Political Science

The Political and Government department can be reached at 860.768.4234

POL 110 Power and Politics in America

3 credits
This survey course provides the foundation for understanding American government as it exists at the beginning of the 21st century. It deals with the organic background and contemporary reality of our federal republic governed under a written constitution. The established structures of government-Congress, president, bureaucracy, and courts-are studied, together with the less formal political structures, such as public opinion, parties, pressure groups, media, and voting-all of which act to grant our government the authority to act. The policies emerging from the systematic interplay of forces from within the government itself, from the states and the people of the nation, and from other nations of the world are studied and evaluated. This course fulfills a general education requirement.

6/12-8/637066Distance LearningTBAOnline3Aliotta

POL 120 Comparative Politics

3 credits
Introduction to the tools, major approaches, and goals of comparative political analysis. Consideration of value orientations and biases, and survey of issues of comparative politics, including development (or change), violence, stability, and integration.

6/12-8/637202Distance LearningTBAOnline3Wallace

POL 130 International Relations

3 credits
This course is a broad introduction and overview to international politics. It provides students with tools for analyzing actors, structures, and processes in international relations while investigating a wide range of issues in contemporary world politics—power, armed conflict, political economy, development, and the global environment.

6/12-8/636517Distance LearningTBAOnline3Clancy

POL 250 Law and the Justice System

3 credits
An examination of Law as a political and social force.  The course emphasizes description and evaluation of contemporary American legal institutions and processes, although comparisons with the legal systems of other countries are provided where appropriate.  An effort is also made to compare the formal and procedural ideals of the U.S. judicial system with its actual operation.
Prerequisite:  POL 100, or POL 105, or SOC 170; or permission of instructor

5/22-7/3/1738073MW9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.H 2583Goetz

POL 376 Archaeology of the Land of Israel

Course Cross-listed with HIS 306 / JS 306 / SOC 306
This course provides students with an overview of the chronological and cultural structure of the archaeological periods from the third millennium through the Byzantine period, with emphasis on the Roman and Byzantine eras. The course includes fieldwork in Israel, lectures, workshops on material culture, museum tours, and field trips. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. Beyond these required activities, a primary objective of the course is a research paper to be completed during the spring or summer following the return to the United States. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture. All students complete field and class work for both courses.

7/4-8/136473Study AbroadTBATBA3Freund

POL 377 Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture

Course Cross-listed with HIS 307 / JS 307 / SOC 307
This course is an introduction to excavation techniques and material culture. It includes principles of excavation and recording, material culture identification/processing, and field-study tours. Early synagogues and church architecture serve as foci for analysis. This course contains a full introduction to the methodology of Near Eastern archaeology from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age, practical instruction in ceramic typology and Semitic inscriptions, and a survey of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine society. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeology of the Land of Israel. All students complete field- and class work for both courses.

7/4-8/136009Study AbroadTBATBA3Freund

POL 453W Crime, Law, and the Administration of Justice

Course Cross-listed with SOC 473W
3 credits Writing Intensive
This writing interdisciplinary seminar focuses on major issues of current interest in criminal justice. It examines selected topics from administrative, governmental, and sociological points of view. The course relates theory and research to the practical problems of applying knowledge in criminal justice through written assignments based on the writing-intensive course model in the college.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and 9 credits of courses required for criminal justice, or permission of instructor.

6/3-8/537372S9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.A 4223DiChiara

Psychology

The Psychology Department can be reached at 860.768.4544

PSY 105 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits
This course discusses what factors have shaped who you are today. How does the brain work? What is the nature of prejudice? We will discuss these and other core questions related to the concepts, theories and methods of psychology. Topics include history; methodology; biological bases of behavior; development; sensation and perception; consciousness; cognition, social and personality psychology and psychological disorders. (Please note PSY 105 requires that students participate as a subject in at least one experiment in the department subject pool during the semester or discuss with the course instructor an appropriate alternative.)

5/22-6/2937368Distance LearningTBAOnline3Viereck
6/12-8/637367Distance LearningTBAOnline3Hogg

PSY 215 Lifespan Development

3 credits
This course discusses if you are you the same person that you were at age 3 or 14. How do people change over time? In this course, development across conception to death is examined. Special attention is devoted to the normative cognitive and social-emotional changes that occur across infancy, toddlerhood, adolescents, and adulthood.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105,101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174

5/22-6/2937657Distance LearningTBAonline3Segool

PSY 132 Human Development

Course Cross-listed with EDP 132-36706
3 credits
Theories and research in human development from infancy through adulthood. Students carry out structured observations and integrate these observations with various theoretical issues. (Please note that this course does not fulfill a requirement for the psychology major or minor.)

6/12-8/636718 Distance Learning TBA Online 3Cromwell

PSY 240 Infant and Child Development

3 credits
Child growth and behavior from the prenatal period to puberty are studied. Effects of heredity and environment on the motor, language, social, and emotional development of children. Emphasis on the concept of developing self and its effects on behavior.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105, 101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174.

5/22-6/2935826Distance LearningTBAOnline3Politikos

PSY 241 Adolescent and Adult Development

3 credits
Individual personal adjustment is studied during the periods of transition across adolescence and adulthood. Transitions and shifts in social relationships due to changing physical maturation, emotional reasoning, cognitive development, and personality development are discussed.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105,101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174

7/10-8/1737369Distance LearningTBAOnline3Politikos

PSY 252 Social Psychology

3 credits
The social and cultural factors affecting human behavior, with particular emphasis on their effects on motivation, personality, attitudes, and opinions. Social interaction processes, including group dynamics, are also studied.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105,101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174.

5/22-6/2937230Distance LearningTBAOnline3Ketay

PSY 253 Psychology Applied to the Workplace

3 credits
The application of the scientific method to human problems in the workplace. Major areas of emphasis include motivation, job satisfaction, selection, training, evaluation, equipment design, and consumer behavior.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105,101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174

6/12-8/636318Distance LearningTBAOnline3Sharp

PSY 257 Multicultural Issues in Psychology

3 credits
The application of the scientific method to human problems in the workplace. Major areas of emphasis include motivation, job satisfaction, selection, training, evaluation, equipment design, and consumer behavior.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105,101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174.

5/22-6/2937366Distance LearningTBAOnline3Cooke

PSY 260 Psychology of Adjustment

3 credits
The human adjustment process. Elements in normal personality development are examined. Reactions to the typical stresses and frustrations in normal living situations are studied with a view toward understanding effective adjustments as well as defensive behavior.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105,101 or 102, or PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174.

 

5/22-6/29372353TBAOnline3Segool

PSY 262 Abnormal Psychology

3 credits
This course reviews the major forms of psychopathology, concentrating on the symptoms, causes, and treatments of the various mental disorders. These include anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, substance abuse, and the eating disorders.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 105.

6/12-8/639269Distance LearningTBAOnline3Guillory

PSY 372 Statistics for Psychology

4 credits
This course answers the question “when does difference matter?”. In this course students learn how to analyze quantitative data in psychology and the behavioral sciences. Students examine how to understand and make sound conclusions about group differences; i.e., do men and women have different personality traits? Coverage of statistical topics include descriptive and inferential methods. Students use statistical software to explore research questions and learn how to write research findings in APA style format. Students also learn the basics of research design in order to select appropriate statistical techniques.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 or PSY 102 or PSY 105, PSB 111, or HON 173 or 174 and WRT 111 or 210, RPW 111 or 210, ENB 210, or HON 183 or 210
Laboratory fee

5/23-6/2937670TR9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.E 118 4Anastas

PSY 380 Contemporary Studies in Psychology: Media Psychology

3 credits
Concentrated studies in contemporary psychology, such as decision making, intervention methods, gender issues, developmental issues, and health issues. Students may repeat this course as the topics meet their individual curricula needs.
Prerequisite(s): One 200-level PSY course.

5/22-6/2936219Distance LearningTBAOnline3Hogg

PSY 384 Undergraduate Internship (Jr)

3 credits
This course provides supervised work experience for qualified juniors in psychology. The agencies where students work may include, but are not limited to, alcohol and drug treatment programs, community mental health clinics, mental hospitals, schools for handicapped children, schools for emotionally disturbed children, and criminal justice treatment centers. Graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.
Prerequisite(s): A GPA of at least 2.75, both overall and in psychology; and three courses in psychology above the introductory level and permission of the Department’s Director of Internship Training.
Prerequisite(s): One 200-level PSY course.

5/22-6/2937513ArrangedArrangedArranged3Lagace

PSY 470W Research Methods for Psychology

4 credits Writing Intensive
This course teaches students to be better consumers of everyday knowledge while applying the principles of research design to the study of contemporary psychological issues. Students explore topics of research methodology, data collection, and report writing with an emphasis on study design, internal and external validity, and ethical aspects of psychological research. Several research projects throughout the semester allow students to gain firsthand research experience by collecting and analyzing data and writing results in APA style format.
Prerequisite(s): C- or above in PSY 372,or permission of instructor. (Writing intensive course)
Laboratory fee.

7/6-8/1537232TR10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. E 1183Landry

PSY 484 Undergraduate Internship (Sr)

3 credits
This course provides supervised work experience for qualified seniors in psychology. The agencies where students work may include, but are not limited to, alcohol and drug treatment programs, community mental health clinics, mental hospitals, schools for handicapped children, schools for emotionally disturbed children, and criminal justice treatment centers. Graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.
Prerequisite(s) A GPA of at least 2.75, both overall and in psychology; and five courses in psychology above the introductory level and permission of the Department’s Director of Internship Training.

5/22-6/2937512ArrangedArrangedArranged3Lagace

PSY 510 Experimental Design

3 credits
Provides an understanding of the concepts underlying research design and develops skills in designing studies amenable to multivariate statistical analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/9 37355Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Nicklin

PSY 527 Substance Use and Abuse

3 credits
A comprehensive study of substance use and abuse, including such topics as basic neurophysiology, addiction, and the effects of specific licit and illicit drugs.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

5/23-6/2239399TR5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.TBA3Zelikovsky

PSY 530 The Psychology of Career Development

3 credits
Concentrated studies in a variety of topics in organizational psychology, such as decision making, creativity in organizations, diversity issues, and organizational learning.  Students may repeat this course as the topics meet their individual curriculum needs.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/336503MW5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.E 2213Schultz

PSY 535 Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology

3 credits
This course is a comprehensive overview of industrial/organizational psychology and its practical application in the workplace. It covers the application of psychology, sociology, and management science to human behavior in the workplace. Major areas of emphasis include motivation, job attitudes, selection, training, and occupational health.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/937249Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Sharp

PSY 545 Motivation in the Workplace: Theory and Application

3 credits
This course provides knowledge of human motivation as it applies to the workplace. Using a science practitioner model, emphasis is on major theories of work motivation and practical applications. Other issues include motivation as it relates to work teams, training, leadership, job design, and sociocultural influences.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

7/10-8/2737251Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Nicklin

PSY 545 Performance Evaluation and Management in Organizations

3 credits
This course provides an overview of performance evaluation and the performance management process within the workplace. The emphasis is on understanding the components of a good performance management system, and how to use the system to enhance employee performance. The course will focus on how to correctly define and measure performance, how to design a performance appraisal system, and how to train raters on the proper use of the 
system.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/937683Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Hoffman, A

PSY 545 Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice and Leadership

3 credits
The purpose of the course is to help students understand organizations, organizational psychology theories and to take effective action in them.
Students will be able to (1) assess organizational context and readiness for change, and (2) apply key strategies to plan, implement, and evaluate organizational behavior and change.  The course will examine organizational behavior and change through each of Bolman and Deal’s four-frame analysis and of organizations: structural, human resource, political, and symbolic.  Included strategies are: assessing change readiness, overcoming resistance, performance management, collaborative planning, teamwork and leadership.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/23 & 6/2936600TR5:00 p.m. - 7:20 p.m. E 2213Toller
5/24-6/2836600Distance LearningTBAOnline3Toller

PSY 545 Consulting and Professional Practices

3 credits
This course is broadly designed to develop the “consultant mindset,” an approach which enables an individual to diagnose issues and propose solutions. It will also build knowledge pertaining to professional posture, career tracks, and ethical practice. The course applies these competencies to common practical issues faced by organizations, such as change management, learning and development, individual/team leadership, etc.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/937250Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Cerasoli

PSY 545 Training and Learning in Organizations

3 credits
Provides an overview of workplace training and development through the lens of organizational psychology. Students will explore several models for planning effective programs in a variety of for profit and nonprofit settings, with a focus on teaching and learning for adult learners, specifically taking into account the importance of individual differences, perceptual, and underlying factors in learning environments. While learning the technical skills and considerations for designing, delivering, and evaluating training programs, students will have an opportunity to design a sample training program.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

7/10-8/2737696Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Staff

PSY 545 Groups and Teams in Organizations

3 credits
This course provides an overview of team issues in organizations. Balancing theory with application, it is targeted to any graduate student in organizational behavior (OB), human resources (HR), or industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology. This course will explore the values of teams, team composition, factors that impact team effectiveness and productivity over time, and troubleshooting team malfunctions.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

7/10-8/2737709Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Cerasoli

PSY 552 Social Psychology

3 credits
Various social psychological theories of social behavior will be examined with regard to the types of causal frameworks and levels of analysis they represent. Recent empirical research and current theoretical issues will be considered in relation to theories of social psychology.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/23-6/2235827TR 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.E 1123Powell
5/23-6/2235898TR1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.E 1123Powell

PSY 553 Clinical Child Development (Psy.D.)

3 credits
This course relates traditional methods of child assessment and treatment to current topics in developmental psychology. Child psychopathology will be examined in terms of cognitive and social emotional growth. Topics include maternal/infant bonding, the development of moral judgment, Piaget’s theory of intellectual development, the growth of prosocial behaviors, the impact of long- and short-term separations on children, the value of play and fantasy, the effects of child abuse, and the role of the father in child rearing. In addition, recent changes in parental roles and maternal employment will be studied to assess their impact on the child and family.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-7/3 35806 MW 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. E 1123Weber

PSY 554 Community Psychology

3 credits
An applied course in the interaction between the individual and the social environment, with special concern for the various models for psychological intervention as these relate to community needs and characteristics with special attention to issues of diversity and poverty.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/22-6/2637100MW12:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.E 1043Crespi

PSY 555 Personnel Psychology

3 credits
Attention is given to job analysis, testing, training and development, group effectiveness, leadership and social influence, and motivation, especially as they affect productivity, work quality, and turnover. Contemporary, employee-centered strategies are examined, focusing on job and environmental redesign to fit existing human resources, psychological needs, and quality-of-life goals.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 535.

7/10-8/2737252Distance LearningTBAVirtual campus3Sharp

PSY 581 Advanced Research Methods

3 credits
This course provides a bridge between the relatively standardized experimental psychology course and the original research required for the thesis. Consideration is given to proposal preparation, pilot studies, selection of appropriate controls, instrumentation, design, ethical issues, computer analysis, interpretation of data, report preparation and presentation.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

7/10-8/2737357Distance LearningTBAVirtual campus 3Nicklin

PSY 620 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior

3 credits
Introduces students to the complex practices of writing, reading, and thinking required in university courses. Students learn to approach writing as a process of invention, drafting, revising, and editing. The course also emphasizes rhetorical aspects of writing, such as audience, arrangement, and academic conventions. Students also learn to read diverse texts critically by practicing close-reading strategies. Students should become more confident about and competent at understanding the positions of others as well as asserting their own informed perspectives. Designated sections of the course require additional work on basic skills. This course may not be elected on a Pass/No Pass basis. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in a psychology graduate program or permission of instructor.

5/23-6/2935964TR9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. E 1053Marino
5/23-6/2935965TR1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.E 1053Marino

PSY 625 Capstone Project

3 credits
Projects are selected by the students with permission of the instructor. Emphasis on individual study of the literature and, where appropriate, research work. A meeting with the faculty advisor is held several times during the semester for discussion of progress, review of the recent developments in the area, and presentation of student reports.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 510  and PSY 581.

5/22-7/937037Distance LearningTBAVirtual Campus3Nicklin
5/22-8/1737453Distance LearningTBAArranged3Sharp
7/10-8/2738788Distance LearningTBAArranged3Staff

PSY 629 Principles of Family Therapy

3 credits
Projects are selected by the students with permission of the instructor. Emphasis on individual study of the literature and, where appropriate, research work. A meeting with the faculty advisor is held several times during the semester for discussion of progress, review of the recent developments in the area, and presentation of student reports.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 510 and PSY 581.

5/22-6/2636334MW4:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.E 1043Crespi

PSY 649 Group Process and Psychotherapy

3 credits
A study of group processes and dynamics. Various approaches, theories, and techniques of group psychotherapy are examined.
Prerequisite(s): Full-time status in Clinical Practices or School Psychology program, or permission of program director.

5/23-6/2236507TR8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.E 1113Gould
5/22-5/2636352MTWRF8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.E 2213Politikos

PSY 680 Internship in Organizational Psychology

3 credits
This course provides 200 hours of supervised practical experience for graduate students in the Organizational Psychology program.  Students develop skills in such areas as human resource management, training, and selection with local private and public organizations.  Specific duties for students are determined in consultation with the program director and internship supervisor.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 535  and PSY 555.

5/22-8/1737231TBATBATBA3Sharp

Academic Writing

WRT 110 Academic Writing I

3 credits
Introduces students to the complex practices of writing, reading, and thinking required in university courses. Students learn to approach writing as a process of invention, drafting, revising, and editing. The course also emphasizes rhetorical aspects of writing, such as audience, arrangement, and academic conventions. Students also learn to read diverse texts critically by practicing close-reading strategies. Students should become more confident about and competent at understanding the positions of others as well as asserting their own informed perspectives. Designated sections of the course require additional work on basic skills. This course may not be elected on a Pass/No Pass basis. (Formerly RPW 110)
Laboratory fee.

5/23-6/2937345TR4:20 p.m. - 7:20 p.m.A 1093D'Ascoli

WRT 111 Academic Writing II

3 credits
This course emphasizes close reading, analytical writing, and critical thinking that are fundamental for many upper-level courses. Building upon the abilities introduced in WRT 110 , critical thinking is taught as students learn to examine multiple perspectives, to analyze an argument, to research, locate, and evaluate sources (print and digital), and to present a persuasive viewpoint. As students assert their informed perspectives, they learn to engage with the words and ideas of others without compromising their academic integrity. A primary goal of this course is for students to learn to participate fully in scholarly discourses and debates. Designated sections of this course require additional work in basic skills. This course may not be elected on a Pass/No Pass basis. (Formerly RPW 111)
Prerequisite(s): WRT 110.
Laboratory fee.

7/11-8/1737347TR4:20 p.m. - 7:20 p.m.A 1093Provost

WRT 210 Foundations of Argument

3 credits
This foundation course in critical thinking allows students to sharpen their abilities to form and present clear, reasoned opinions. Students analyze discourse, texts, and images to comprehend the arguments they are making; identify and evaluate the assumptions, evidence, and rhetorical strategies on which arguments are based; understand the major components of inductive and deductive reasoning; evaluate the relationships between premises and conclusions while recognizing major fallacies; and make reasoned judgments about an argument’s validity and potential consequences. No credit for RPW 210 will be given to students who have credit for WRT 111. (Formerly RPW 210)
Prerequisite(s): WRT 110.
Laboratory fee.

6/12-8/637348Distance LearningTBAOnline3Huston

Sociology

The  Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice can be reached at 860.768.4321

SOC 100 Cooperative Education Program

1-6 credit(s)
Work experience in a public or private organizational setting under the supervision of the co-op faculty coordinator. It is required that the objectives and evaluation criteria be set by a learning contract.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 170 , sophomore standing, GPA of 2.5, and approval of co-op coordinator.

5/22-7/336290Distance LearningTBAOnline1-6DiChiara

SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits
A survey of the social responses to crime and the major social institutions created to control crime. The course introduces the ideologies of crime and crime control; the determination of rates of crime; the structure, operation, and effectiveness of the major criminal justice agencies; and contemporary issues in crime control. The focus of the course is on the United States, but students will be exposed to issues of crime and crime control in other societies.

6/12-8/636717Distance LearningTBAOnline3Morra

SOC 113 Contemporary Social Issues

3 credits
Sociological perspective on the tensions, conflicts, and issues that come to be defined as contemporary social problems presents an analysis of historical, cultural, political background of social conflicts. Several specific issues will be discussed in detail along with a critical evaluation of the social policy formulated to solve our most significant social problems.

6/12-8/636700Distance LearningTBAOnline3Morra

SOC 170 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits
A survey of the social responses to crime and the major social institutions created to control crime. The course introduces the ideologies of crime and crime control; the determination of rates of crime; the structure, operation, and effectiveness of the major criminal justice agencies; and contemporary issues in crime control. The focus of the course is on the United States, but students will be exposed to issues of crime and crime control in other societies.

6/12-8/636523Distance LearningTBAOnline3DiChiara

SOC 200 Cooperative Education Program

1-6 credit(s)
Work experience in a public or private organizational setting under the supervision of the co-op faculty coordinator. It is required that the objectives and evaluation criteria be set by a learning contract.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 170, sophomore standing, GPA of 2.5, and approval of co-op coordinator.

5/22-7/336393Distance LearningTBAOnline1-6DiChiara

SOC 271 Deviance

3 credits
This course analyzes the social processes and structural factors that form deviance in society. The course includes the study of how behaviors and attributes come to be defined as deviant as well as how patterns of deviance come to be organized. These topics are linked to the reaction to deviance to outline the relationship between deviance and social order. This course satisfies a writing-intensive requirement when listed as SOC 271W.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 170.

7/10-8/1736399Distance LearningTBAOnline3DiChiara

SOC 306 Archaeology of the Land of Israel

Course Cross-listed with HIS 306 / JS 306 / POL 376
3 credits
This course provides students with an overview of the chronological and cultural structure of the archaeological periods from the third millennium through the Byzantine period, with emphasis on the Roman and Byzantine eras. The course includes fieldwork in Israel, lectures, workshops on material culture, museum tours, and field trips. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. Beyond these required activities, a primary objective of the course is a research paper to be completed during the spring or summer following the return to the United States. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture. All students complete field and class work for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

7/4-8/135934Study AbroadTBATBA3Freund

SOC 307 Archaeological Field Methods and Material Culture

Course Cross-listed with HIS 307 / JS 307 / POL 377
3 credits
This course is an introduction to excavation techniques and material culture. It includes principles of excavation and recording, material culture identification/processing, and field-study tours. Early synagogues and church architecture serve as foci for analysis. This course contains a full introduction to the methodology of Near Eastern archaeology from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age, practical instruction in ceramic typology and Semitic inscriptions, and a survey of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine society. Daily field-school instruction is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (total: 15 days of excavation). Lectures and workshops take place each afternoon. This course is linked to an integrated companion course, Archaeology of the Land of Israel. All students complete field- and class work for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

7/4-8/135935Study AbroadTBATBA3Freund

SOC 318 Internships

3 credits
These courses provide the opportunity for qualified junior and senior students to explore their career interests and skills as an integral part of their educational process. Under faculty supervision students complete a reading assignment and a writing project to integrate the practical experiences into their educational program. Placements can be arranged in a variety of public and private organizations. The Sociology maintains a directory of approved placements. Students volunteer eight or 16 hours each week in a chosen agency or organization.
Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior status, GPA of 2.5 for non-majors, and written approval of advisor.

5/22-7/336263Distance LearningTBAOnline3DiChiara

SOC 319 Internships

3 credits
These courses provide the opportunity for qualified junior and senior students to explore their career interests and skills as an integral part of their educational process. Under faculty supervision students complete a reading assignment and a writing project to integrate the practical experiences into their educational program. Placements can be arranged in a variety of public and private organizations. The Sociology maintains a directory of approved placements. Students volunteer eight or 16 hours each week in a chosen agency or organization.
Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior status, GPA of 2.5 for nonmajors, and written approval of advisor.

5/22-7/337233Distance LearningTBAOnline3DiChiara

SOC 473W Crime, Law, and Administration of Justice

Course Cross-listed with POL 453W
3 credits Writing Intensive
This writing-intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on major issues of current interest in criminal justice. It examines selected topics from administrative, governmental, and sociological points of view. The course relates theory and research to the practical problems of applying knowledge in criminal justice.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and 9 credit hours of criminal justice required courses POL 250, SOC 170, SOC 242, SOC 271, SOC 318, SOC 470; or permission of instructor.

6/3-8/537059S9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.A 4223DiChiara

Modern Languages

The Department of Modern Languages Department can be reached at 860.768.4743.

SPA 110 Elementary Spanish I

3 credits
Introduction to Spanish. Intensive training in understanding, speaking, reading, writing, and using basic communicative patterns. The course also covers cultural materials of Hispanic communities and societies. A student who has taken two years of a language in secondary school is normally assigned to the 111 (Elementary II) level, while a student with four years of language in secondary school is encouraged to enroll in an intermediate course (level 210 or 211).

5/22-7/336596Distance LearningTBAOnline3Cupolo

SPA 111 Elementary Spanish II

3 credits
Introduction to Spanish. Intensive training in understanding, speaking, reading, writing, and using basic communicative patterns. The course also covers cultural materials of Hispanic communities and societies. A student who has taken two years of a language in secondary school is normally assigned to the 111 (Elementary II) level, while a student with four years of language in secondary school is encouraged to enroll in an intermediate course (level 210 or 211).

7/10-8/1737371Distance LearningTBAOnline3Rojas

SPA 210 Intermediate Spanish I

4 credits
An intensive review and continued development of the four skills, understanding, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on reading literary and cultural texts

5/22-7/1737370Distance LearningTBAOnline4Cupolo

SPA 210 Intermediate Spanish II

4 credits
An intensive review and continued development of the four skills, with emphasis on reading literary and cultural texts.

7/10-8/1738008Distance LearningTBAOnline3Rojas