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Why Am I Undecided?

Identify with any of these statements? Find tips for how to address it by clicking on the statement or statements that best describes you.

Common Reasons for Being Undecided

I would like to review all of my options available at U of H before making a commitment/decision.

Review the Undergraduate Bulletin for a complete listing of all the academic options available to you. Don't skip over the unknown majors - make notes on those that sound interesting based on the required coursework and practical training opportunities built into the program.

Once you have identified one or more majors of interest you can either:

  • Make an appointment with your academic advisor to discuss your choices.  
  • Make an appointment with a faculty member in an academic department of interest to ask detailed questions about an individual major of interest.

Be cautious about skipping a major due to misconceptions or misinformation. For example: did you skip over Psychology because you don't want to attend graduate school in the future or become a Psychologist?

Remember: choosing one major over your other options does not mean ignoring your other interest areas. Consider major/minor combinations supporting your other interest areas through electives or general education requirements, research projects, involvement in clubs/organizations, participation in study abroad, volunteer or internship opportunities.

There are some careers that "favor" or even require one degree over another. If you're interested in a particular career, research which majors are required or recommended/preferred prior to making a decision. Conducting research early into your academic career allows you the opportunity to be able to develop the skills that will make you more marketable.

I have narrowed down my options to two or three possible majors but do not feel I have enough information to make a decision.

For each major you are currently considering, schedule time to continue the exploration process. Your next steps will consist of:

  • Analyzing what you know about your choices
  • Assessing what information you still need to gather
  • Determining whether you meet the academic requirements for entry
  • Matching your level of interest for each choice
  • Ranking your choices in order of "best fit"

There are some careers that "favor" or even require one degree over another. If you're interested in a particular career, research which majors are required or recommended/preferred prior to making a decision. Conducting research early into your academic career allows you the opportunity to be able to develop the skills that will make you more marketable.

Once you have narrowed down your options:

  • Make an appointment with your academic advisor to discuss your academic plan, your progress so far and how it "fits" with your options, as well as, his/her recommendations for next steps.
  • Make an appointment with a faculty member in an academic department of interest to ask detailed questions about an individual major of interest. You may also want to consider asking for the name of an upperclassman to speak with in order to gain a student's perspective.

I feel overwhelmed by all of the options available and I don't know where to start the decision-making process.

A good first step is to talk with a Career Advisor. Career Advisors are available by appointment through the Career Services Office. They can assist you in exploring "best fit" fields of study based on your interests, skills, and values, as well as educate you on the decision-making process.

I have a career in mind, but I'm not certain what major would provide the training and preparation.

Many people are going to be able to offer you well-meaning advice - for example: If you want to be a doctor, major in biology or if you want to go into business, major in business. This type of advice reflects the idea that careers require one specific undergraduate major.

Once you have identified a potential career path, consider the following next steps:

  • Conduct informational interviews with two or three professionals in the career that interests you - preferably from different work environments. An informational interview will allow you the opportunity to learn about their previous education and training that prepared them for their role, as well as, their suggestions for how to develop yourself through your major.
  • Conduct informational interviews with up to two faculty members within courses that interest you. Ask them if they think a major in their academic area would lead you to your career goal.

Using the resources available through the Career Services Office, research your career path to learn more about recommended majors and/or degrees as well as other training and education requirements, related career paths and industry options that support your occupational area of interest.

I have a major in mind, but would like more information on related career paths.

Consider making an appointment with a Career Advisor through the Office of Career Services. Career Advisors are available to help you explore relationships to potential career paths. In addition, Advisors will introduce you to the online and hardcover resources available to help you connect your field of interest with possible occupational areas.

A good place to start is: What Can I Do With This Major? This site will show you tons of majors that you can click on to learn more about possible career paths.

I have a major in mind, but my friends and/or family don't think I should major in that.

This is a challenging situation. It is always easier when our major/career goals fit the ideas that others have for us. However, it is important to recognize that you will have to live the day-to-day consequences of the choices you make. The good news is that typically, important people in your life want you to be happy and financially secure.

You may be surprised to know:

  • If you describe your strengths and weaknesses you may gain support for your choice of major/career
  • Important people in your life may not have the most up-to-date information about majors/careers that interest you
  • If you keep sharing your ideas, academic facts, career information, and enthusiasm about your choice of major/career you are likely to gain greater acceptance and support for your decisions.

You are not alone in dealing with this challenging situation. Help and support are available. It is important to keep your Academic Advisor aware of any concerns you may have - an open line of communication is a critical component in the relationship with your Advisor so that he/she may provide you with the services and resources needed to accommodate your situation.

I am undecided for other reasons not mentioned above.

Please call the Office of Career Services at 860-768-4287 to make an appointment with a Career Advisor. Career Advisors are available to assist you with academic and career-related issues.

As always, Career Services is here to assist you. If you need more help, please schedule an appointment