Biography
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Biography

Dean Alan Hadad is Professor of Physics, Associate Vice President, and Dean of University Magnet Schools.  He came to the University of Hartford in 1989 as Professor of Physics and Dean of the Samuel I Ward College of Technology.  In 1997, he was appointed Dean of the College of Engineering in addition to his other deanship.  In 2003, he was the founding dean of the current College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture. In 2005, he assumed his current position.

During the sixteen years between 1989 and 2005, Dean Hadad initiated the undergraduate programs in architectural engineering technology (1991), mechanical engineering technology (1993), audio engineering technology (1994), and computer engineering technology (1995), as well as the graduate program in architecture (2004).  He also led the college in its initial accreditation of the programs in computer engineering and biomedical engineering in 2004 by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET).

In 2005, Dean Hadad commenced his current work with the University’s two magnet schools, located on the University’s campus.  His work with University High School of Science and Engineering (UHSSE) has been in the forefront of educational innovation in the United States, in that qualified students from UHSSE are allowed to take courses at the University of Hartford free of charge while still matriculated as high school students.  In 2012, UHSSE was named the top magnet high school in the United States by the Magnet Schools of America, an organization comprising more than 6000 schools.

Prior to coming to the University of Hartford, Dean Hadad was Professor and Chair of the Department of Physics at Wentworth Institute of Technology, where he worked from 1979 to 1989.  He has also taught at Southeastern Massachusetts University, Northeastern University, Bently University, and Dartmouth College, his alma mater.