Success Stories

Charlie DeLorenzo ’18, M’19

November 14, 2019
student working on machine
Charlie DeLorenzo ’18, M’19 working in CETA Wind Tunnel lab

Charlie DeLorenzo ’18, M’19 credits the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA) for its strong ties to industry that helped him start his engineering career.

Charlie DeLorenzo graduated with his BSME with a concentration in energy and sustainability and minor in mathematics from the College in May 2018. He then enrolled in the College’s Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering program and is expected to graduate this December. Along with pursuing his MEng, DeLorenzo is an Analytical Engineer at Rolf Group International in Glastonbury, Conn. The company specializes in design and analysis of turbomachinery and other mechanical systems. DeLorenzo says he spends much of his time at work making and testing analytical tools and simulations, researching topics relevant to his current tasks, having design reviews with his superiors.

He credits the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA) for its strong ties to industry that helped him start his engineering career. Specifically, he found his senior design project as a great introduction to knowing how engineering teams operate in industry. The project was a direct application of several concepts that were exercised in undergraduate courses. I gained experience with project management, progress tracking, team cooperation, presentation of results, among numerous other lessons,” Charlie says.

In a state with such a rich engineering history, the local engineering programs are competitive. UHart sold me with their small class sizes, abundance of laboratories, and tangible proof of student progression through senior design projects.

Charlie DeLorenzo ’18, M’19
student working on machine
Charlie DeLorenzo ’18, M’19 working in CETA Wind Tunnel lab

DeLorenzo finds inspiration to continue working in the engineering field through technology advancements and finding ways to approach aspects in life better than we have before. “In my opinion, that is one of the most positive motivators one can have for a career; your work is directly contributing to technological advancement,” Charlie says. When asked what advice he would share with incoming CETA and UHart students, he encourages the next generation to keep going, especially as they embark on careers in engineering, technology, and architecture. Take advantage of what you learn inside and outside the classroom as these lessons will yield success by the time to you finish your college career.