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Keeping Hawks Healthy

Read the latest updates on UHart's response to COVID-19: hartford.edu/healthy-hawks.

Messages and Advisories

COVID-19 updates shared with the UHart community

Current communications that have been shared with University of Hartford students, faculty, staff, parents, and alumni are listed below in chronological order. The most recent communications will be added to the top of this list as they become available. 

Messages are also organized by specific UHart groups—students, parents, faculty, and staff. See the breakdown.

Most Recent Updates to the Community

October 26: Increase in Positive Cases

Dear Campus Community,

Over the last week, we have seen an uptick in the number of community members testing positive for COVID-19. After celebrating several weeks of few or zero new cases, we had 18 positives last week. This increase is consistent with our peer institutions and the growing numbers in the state. We believe that the rise in cases is due primarily to off-campus activities.

All of the infected students are either home recovering or are in isolation on campus in separate isolation space. Our professional contact tracers have reached out to those who were in close contact with the positive cases, and anyone determined to be at risk is now in quarantine. The 18 positive cases can be tied back to three separate pockets, and we are carefully monitoring these groups. In addition to our regular weekly community testing held each week, we hosted an additional testing event for high-risk groups on Friday afternoon. We plan to begin implementing a pooled saliva testing program this week to continue expanding our testing and tracing efforts. The results of our wastewater sampling on campus continue to show no evidence of COVID-19, indicating that we are not experiencing a widespread issue on campus. While we are disappointed that our numbers increased, we have a strong handle on the situation and are not concerned about a widespread issue at this time. A reminder that if you test positive for COVID-19 at a facility off campus, you must call Health Services at 860.768.6601 to report the results as soon as possible. This allows our contact tracers to quickly begin their important work.

After many months of restrictions, we understand the desire to resume “normal” activities. However, Connecticut and the rest of the country are currently experiencing significant increases in positive cases. Our own increase serves as a reminder to stay vigilant on our health and safety measures. It is crucial that we continue to:

  • Complete the health screening on the LiveSafe app every day before coming to campus, or before going to class if you are a residential student
  • Stay home if you sick
  • Wear a mask covering your mouth and nose everywhere you go
  • Maintain social distancing of 6 feet
  • Do not host or be part of any large gatherings or parties, on or off campus
  • Follow all other health and safety policies

We will continue to update our online dashboard and share information on the Healthy Hawks website and via email. As always, please email covid19@hartford.edu with any questions or concerns.

The actions of only a few can have a serious impact on our entire community, as well as the health of peers, colleagues, family, and friends. Please do your part to keep everyone safe. Your choices have consequences. Do not be selfish. With your help, we can continue to slow the spread of COVID-19 in our communities and on campus.

Thank you,

Jessica M. Nicklin
Associate Vice President for Student Success
COVID-19 Coordinator

October 23: Spring Semester

Dear Campus Community,

As we continue to work together to fight the spread of COVID-19 this fall, plans are well underway for the spring semester. We will continue to offer a blended approach to education, which will include in-person classes, as well as hybrid, remote, and online courses. As always, our plans depend upon ongoing guidance from the state of Connecticut and public health officials, but we remain confident that by following all of our health and safety guidelines, we can continue to keep our campus healthy.

Academic Calendar

We have made some important changes to the spring academic calendar to allow for a longer break, to get through the worst of the winter flu season, and to reduce the number of campus openings and reopenings. These include starting the spring semester 12 days later than previously scheduled and eliminating spring break. Many of our peer institutions in the state and across the country are following a similar strategy. By making these changes and keeping students on campus without having a spring break, we prevent travel-related risks and avoid complications caused by the state travel advisory

Although there will not be a spring break, the University will create opportunities for downtime throughout the semester, during which the University will offer some additional fun events.

Spring schedule:

  • Classes Begin: Monday, Feb. 1
  • Classes End: Friday, May 7
  • *Final Exams Begin: Saturday, May 8
  • Reading Day: Sunday, May 9
  • Final Exams End: Friday, May 14

* There are only a few courses that typically meet on Saturdays for exams

Students will be required to show documentation of a negative COVID-19 test before moving onto campus or, for commuters, before starting class. We will share more information about this process, as well as details of spring move-in, soon.

Other Key Updates

Residential Life

As a reminder, residence halls close for the fall semester on Tuesday, Nov. 24, at 10 p.m.Students who finish in-person classes prior to Nov. 24 are encouraged to leave for break at their earliest convenience.

At this time, students do not need to sign up for a move-out time slot; there is plenty of time for all students to move out safely if students stagger their departures as they finish classes. As always, social distancing and masks will be required, and we will have additional cleaning of high-touch areas taking place during this time. As a reminder, no guests are allowed in any of the campus residence halls or buildings. If you have someone coming to campus to pick you up, they must fill out the LiveSafe health survey prior to arriving via the app or online.

As of now, and this is subject to change, students may leave their belongings in their rooms/suites/apartments. However, you should take all valuables (money, jewelry, high-end or sentimental items), as well as personal and academic items (driver's license, passport, medicine, computers, textbooks, other academic materials).

Details of the move-out process, how to request a late stay due to a class or travel issues, and information about break housing for those who meet certain criteria will be shared soon.


Travel Restrictions
 
We are extending international travel restrictions on University-sponsored travel in an effort to protect our campus community. In compliance with the CDC's recommendation that Americans avoid nonessential travel, all University-sponsored international travel, including study abroad, will remain restricted for faculty, staff, and students. We continue to actively monitor guidance from the State Department and the CDC with the intention of changing or removing restrictions as soon as it is deemed safe to do so.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email covid19@hartford.edu. Our Healthy Hawks website continues to be a valuable informational resource.

Thank you again for everything you do to keep the community thriving. Best wishes for your continued success this fall, and I look forward to this upcoming spring.

Sincerely,
Greg Woodward

Messages in Chronological Order

October Updates

October 23: Spring Semester

Dear Campus Community,

As we continue to work together to fight the spread of COVID-19 this fall, plans are well underway for the spring semester. We will continue to offer a blended approach to education, which will include in-person classes, as well as hybrid, remote, and online courses. As always, our plans depend upon ongoing guidance from the state of Connecticut and public health officials, but we remain confident that by following all of our health and safety guidelines, we can continue to keep our campus healthy.

Academic Calendar

We have made some important changes to the spring academic calendar to allow for a longer break, to get through the worst of the winter flu season, and to reduce the number of campus openings and reopenings. These include starting the spring semester 12 days later than previously scheduled and eliminating spring break. Many of our peer institutions in the state and across the country are following a similar strategy. By making these changes and keeping students on campus without having a spring break, we prevent travel-related risks and avoid complications caused by the state travel advisory

Although there will not be a spring break, the University will create opportunities for downtime throughout the semester, during which the University will offer some additional fun events.

Spring schedule:

  • Classes Begin: Monday, Feb. 1
  • Classes End: Friday, May 7
  • *Final Exams Begin: Saturday, May 8
  • Reading Day: Sunday, May 9
  • Final Exams End: Friday, May 14

* There are only a few courses that typically meet on Saturdays for exams

Students will be required to show documentation of a negative COVID-19 test before moving onto campus or, for commuters, before starting class. We will share more information about this process, as well as details of spring move-in, soon.

Other Key Updates

Residential Life

As a reminder, residence halls close for the fall semester on Tuesday, Nov. 24, at 10 p.m.Students who finish in-person classes prior to Nov. 24 are encouraged to leave for break at their earliest convenience.

At this time, students do not need to sign up for a move-out time slot; there is plenty of time for all students to move out safely if students stagger their departures as they finish classes. As always, social distancing and masks will be required, and we will have additional cleaning of high-touch areas taking place during this time. As a reminder, no guests are allowed in any of the campus residence halls or buildings. If you have someone coming to campus to pick you up, they must fill out the LiveSafe health survey prior to arriving via the app or online.

As of now, and this is subject to change, students may leave their belongings in their rooms/suites/apartments. However, you should take all valuables (money, jewelry, high-end or sentimental items), as well as personal and academic items (driver's license, passport, medicine, computers, textbooks, other academic materials).

Details of the move-out process, how to request a late stay due to a class or travel issues, and information about break housing for those who meet certain criteria will be shared soon.

Travel Restrictions
 
We are extending international travel restrictions on University-sponsored travel in an effort to protect our campus community. In compliance with the CDC's recommendation that Americans avoid nonessential travel, all University-sponsored international travel, including study abroad, will remain restricted for faculty, staff, and students. We continue to actively monitor guidance from the State Department and the CDC with the intention of changing or removing restrictions as soon as it is deemed safe to do so.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email covid19@hartford.edu. Our Healthy Hawks website continues to be a valuable informational resource.

Thank you again for everything you do to keep the community thriving. Best wishes for your continued success this fall, and I look forward to this upcoming spring.

Sincerely,
Greg Woodward

October 19: Winter Break Scheduling for Employees

Dear Colleagues,

As we are now halfway through the fall semester, I would like to share some updates from HRD and University leadership regarding scheduling.

The University will be closed for the winter holiday break at the end of the day on Wednesday, Dec. 23, and will reopen on Monday, Jan. 4. President Woodward has added Dec. 24 to the break this year to say thank you for all of your hard work and dedication during the COVID-19 pandemic. As in past years, faculty, staff, and students will not be allowed to enter campus buildings during the holiday shutdown with the exception of a limited number of essential service units that have received prior approval. Please note that this is not just a physical shutdown—this is a break. All employees, including remote employees, should use this time off to refresh and recharge before the spring semester begins.

We are also developing plans for the staffing of campus offices between the time students leave for Thanksgiving and when they return for the start of the spring semester. It is important to note there is still a lot of planning to happen regarding the process for students to repopulate campus and begin the spring semester. More information will be forthcoming, but for the purpose of planning, there are two different periods to consider:

  • Nov. 25–Dec. 14: Residence halls will be closed and students will be home, but classes and exams will be occurring remotely.
  • Dec. 15–late January: Students will be off campus and on winter break.

Supervisors should assess whether in-person business operations should continue during either or both of those time periods based on the needs of students, faculty/staff, prospective families, and our larger community. Supervisors should feel empowered to make the decision they feel is best for the department’s business functions and the safety of employees and colleagues on campus. For faculty, academic spaces will remain open and available through Dec. 14 for remote teaching.

Supervisors should communicate to hrd@hartford.edu no later than Nov. 2, 2020, the status of their department for the break beginning Nov. 25. Knowing which employees will be on-site during this time will provide our essential staff in Facilities and Public Safety the ability to shut down buildings, reduce our energy consumption, and thoroughly sanitize spaces.

Please contact HRD at hrd@hartford.edu if you have questions. Thank you for your continued support.

Jen Conley

October 16: Important COVID-19 Policy Update

Dear Students,

I am happy to share that our on-campus COVID-19 cases have now been trending downward for one month. You should all be proud of the part you are playing in protecting yourselves, your fellow students, and the faculty and staff who are working so hard to support you this semester. Because cases are staying low and the vast majority of you are behaving responsibly, we are now able to ease some restrictions for some of our residents. However, due to COVID-19 cases increasing in our surrounding community, particularly in the city of Hartford, we are placing additional restrictions on off-campus gatherings for all of our students, including commuters.

Please note that these policies can change at any time, depending upon health conditions on and off campus and on your continuing to follow our health and safety rules and guidelines. These include, but are not limited to, completing the daily health screening on the LiveSafe app, cooperating with contact tracers, and attending your testing appointment if you are selected for proactive testing. All of our policies can be found on hartford.edu/healthy-hawks.

Hawk Hall and the Neighborhoods

Beginning today, Friday, Oct. 16, the following policy for Hawk Hall and the neighborhoods will be in effect:

  • Residents of these buildings will be allowed to have one guest per room at one time, as long as that guest lives on the same floor.
  • Roommates must agree ahead of time to allow a guest, each time there is a guest.
  • Residents and their guests must wear masks and maintain social distance.

We have heard from many of our students, particularly first-year students and those living in singles, that isolation and loneliness are negatively impacting their mental health. We are hopeful that this new policy will help. Please reach out to your advisors, faculty members, or RAs if you need help and you can always call CAPS resources at 860.768.4482 if you would like to speak to with a counselor.

Suites and Apartments

At this time, we are not going to change our guest policy for suites or apartments. I know this is disappointing, so please allow me to explain our reasoning. Those living in suites and apartments are already part of a larger household unit. You are able to spend time with suitemates and apartment-mates and are not as socially isolated as our students who are living alone. We will continue to monitor health conditions and trends to see if we will be able to relax restrictions in these spaces in the future.

In addition, although our cases on campus are low, we must still be extremely cautious. We are seeing the impact the pandemic can have on many college campuses in Connecticut and the virus is still very active in our region. Health experts now say that small gatherings are a growing source of COVID-19 spread.

Off-Campus Policy Updates

The health risk posed by small gatherings, in addition to the governor designating the city Hartford as a COVID-19 hot spot, is leading to the following change:

  • Effective immediately, gatherings at off-campus living units are limited to ten people.
  • Masks must be worn and social distancing must be maintained during these gatherings.
  • Hosts and guests may be referred to the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution for alleged violations of this policy.
Common Spaces

Please continue to take advantage of our outdoor gathering spaces while the weather cooperates. Common spaces in the residence halls remain available to the students who live there, as long as posted occupancy limits are followed.

We also have indoor spaces across campus where you can meet with friends, classmates, and colleagues. Please refer to 25Live to review location availability and capacities, or contact the Student Center Administration for further guidance at 860.768.4283 or sca@hartford.edu.

Thank you all for your efforts to keep our campus safe. We are getting through this together.

Sincerely,

Jessica Nicklin
Associate Vice President for Student Success

October 9: Spring 2021 Remote Options

Dear Students,

With advance registration for the Spring 2021 semester just around the corner, and the COVID-19 pandemic still active and unpredictable, we are planning for a spring semester that looks very similar to this fall semester. We will continue to offer some classes in hybrid and remote formats, and other classes fully face-to-face whenever we are able to maintain appropriate social distancing.

This semester, some students are taking all of their classes remotely. We understand that students have faced various hardships related to the pandemic, and gladly worked to accommodate these requests. For the Spring 2021 semester, we will again offer students the option of having a fully remote class schedule wherever possible.

We are asking that students who wish to request a fully remote Spring 2021 semester fill out this form by Monday, Oct. 19. You must request fully remote status officially in order to be accommodated as a fully remote student upon registration.

Students who are fully remote during the fall semester will not automatically be considered remote for spring and must still fill out the spring request form to formally apply. If you have any questions, please email css@hartford.edu.

Sincerely,

Jessica Nicklin
Associate Vice President for Student Success
 

Jim Shattuck
Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies

October 8: Celebrating a Milestone

Dear University of Hartford Community,

Today marks a major milestone in our collective determination to keep our campus open this fall. Believe it or not, we are halfway to Thanksgiving break and all I want to say is THANK YOU!

Our students arrived on campus in late August and since then countless schools acrossthe country have been forced to move to fully remote classes. It is easy to imagine several scenarios in which we may have been one of those schools, but here we are. We accomplished this together. Our faculty and staff spent countless hours preparing for the arrival of our students, meeting evolving state mandates, and pivoting to deliver an outstanding educational experience in this new normal. Students, we know this hasn’t been easy. You have shown us you want to be here by following the health and safety guidelines designed to protect you and our larger community. Today, we should all be immensely proud of our individual contributions to our collective success.

To show my appreciation, our friends at Dining Services are hosting some celebratory events throughout the day:

  • Cupcake Give Away: noon­–2 p.m. outside GSU
  • Commons Tailgate: noon­–2 p.m. on the Commons Patio
  • Fall Harvest Dinner: 4:30–9 p.m. inside the Commons
  • S’mores: 6­–8 p.m. at the fire pit between A and C complexes

Please remember that we still have work ahead of us to keep our COVID-19 rates at our current low level. We continue to carefully monitor our positivity rate, trends in our contact tracing, and health conditions in our neighboring communities. We hear your concerns about feeling isolated from friends, and we are working on ways to help—but we need to proceed cautiously. We are reviewing the state’s phase three plans and are hopeful for another good week of testing results.

It remains my hope that, in the next few weeks, we can begin to ease some of our on-campus residential life restrictions. Each residential community has its own unique qualities, so it will likely not be a “one-size-fits-all” solution. Changes we make will be implemented in a safe, deliberate manner. Among the ideas we are considering: allowing more small group gatherings in residential common spaces and shared areas, and expanding our definition of a family unit to allow students in some residential communities to have one guest in their room, as long as that guest lives on the same floor.

As the weather gets colder, please remember that we do have indoor spaces where you can meet with friends, classmates, and colleagues. Please refer to 25Live to review location availability and capacities, or contact the Student Center Administration for further guidance at 860.768.4283 or sca@hartford.edu.

I am grateful to all of you for your patience, cooperation, and dedication to creating a safe community, and immensely proud of the entire University family for weathering this pandemic with character and strength. Keep up the good work!

Greg Woodward
University President

September Updates

September 21: Expectation Reminders

Dear Students,

We are writing to address several behavioral issues that have been managed across campus over the last several days.

Although our number of positive COVID-19 cases remains relatively low, our contact tracing is confirming that groups of students have engaged in behavior that jeopardizes not only our safety, but also the chances of us staying on campus this fall. Some of our diagnosed positive cases are resulting in a significant amount of quarantine requirements because rules have not been followed. We have clearly and repeatedly communicated our rules and expectations, as well as the penalties for failing to follow them. We are writing once again to implore you to make smart decisions. If you don’t, there is a real chance that in-person classes will move online and everyone will go home.

We want to reiterate the rules and expectations currently in place are not the University against our students. This is about all of us coming together as Hawks to fight the spread of a pandemic that is unlike anything we have ever seen. We all want to be here and we are doing everything we can to educate you, support you, and keep you on campus. We understand that it is extremely difficult to not see friends, go to parties, or participate in traditional college experiences. Many of you say we are too strict and have urged us to ease up on our guest restrictions and visitor policy. We still hope to be able to do that. However, that is—quite frankly—impossible for us to do if the current behavior continues.

Here are some important reminders:

  • Do not host or attend parties.
  • Do not have guests in your living space.
  • If you are selected for random proactive testing, you must attend. It is mandatory.
  • Report to Health Services if you are ill or receive a positive result from a test taken off campus.
  • Complete your LiveSafe health screening every day before going to class, or before coming to campus if you live off campus.

Another reminder: be honest with contact tracers. There is an expanded “good samaritan and amnesty” policy in place for those who, during contact tracing, share information that would normally subject them to the conduct process. This is to encourage students to truthfully answer questions related to contact tracing, which is vital to stopping the spread of COVID-19.

To all of you who have behaved responsibly, reminded your classmates and friends to follow the rules, and submitted tips to LiveSafe—thank you. You are protecting yourself and the entire campus, and we all appreciate your efforts.

We can do this!

Thank you,
Division of Student Success

September 18: Testing, Isolation, and Quarantine

Dear Campus Community,

Thank you again for your engagement and participation in the many efforts outlined in Keeping Hawks Healthy. As we move through the semester, and as we identify and manage positive cases and contacts, it is important that we continue to assess and evolve our processes and procedures. Each situation is sensitive and unique. We are learning and adapting, while prioritizing the safety and security of our campus community. I’m writing today to update you on a number of our COVID-19 response initiatives.

Testing

We have contracted with a second local health-care partner with deep clinical expertise to scale our testing. We currently test approximately 5 to 10 percent of residential students as a part of our weekly proactive community testing. Beginning next week, we will test at least 20 to 25 percent and will begin to include other student populations in our testing. We will also continue to offer tests for faculty and staff as previously outlined, and for students who report with symptoms to Health Services. Overall results will continue to be posted to the University’s COVID-19 Dashboard.

Increasing our testing will result in students being asked to test more than once throughout the semester. It is important to note that this is mandatory, but should not be viewed as a punishment. We can certainly appreciate that testing isn’t an activity you would put at the top of your list, but it is necessary to limit the risk of COVID-19 spreading undetected. If you receive an appointment for the weekly testing, you must attend. Testing will continue to be offered in convenient campus locations and it takes less than 10 minutes on average. Thank you for your cooperation.

In addition, as you are aware, we have installed automated self-temperature checks at key building locations at strategic points on campus. We will also be reinstituting random temperature checks at the front entrance so as to be able to continue to assess commuter students. This is in addition to the LiveSafe app that is required for entrance to campus.

Isolation and Quarantine

In coordination with our health-care and agency partners, we have maintained a conservative approach to isolation and quarantine. At the start of the semester, these spaces were largely being occupied by students from travel advisory states who were prepared to quarantine—and they had the ability to leave their spaces. Now, isolation and quarantine spaces are reserved for students who have tested positive or may have been exposed to the virus through contact, as determined by our professional contact tracing team. We have been actively working to prepare and outfit these spaces as they turn over. In addition to the personal items a student brings to isolation or quarantine, linens, toiletries, meals, laundry and other necessary items will be provided. Special requests and accommodations will be available in quarantine and isolation.

What does it mean to be placed in isolation?

Students will only be placed in isolation if they have tested positive for COVID-19. Regardless of whether or not a student is or is not experiencing symptoms, the isolation period will last for 10 days from the day the COVID-19 test was performed. If a student is showing symptoms, they will need monitor themselves each day, and if they worsen or feel ill, they should Health Services or Public Safety immediately. Roommates (and other identified close contacts) will be contacted by the contact-tracing nurses and, as appropriate, directed to quarantine for 14 days. Students will need to remain in their isolation space—meals will be delivered, classes will be taken remotely, and laundry service will be provided. Students are not to leave their assigned spaces and may not have visitors. Per current health guidelines, students in isolation may room together, share a bathroom, and share common space because they have already contracted the virus. Isolation will conclude in 10 days as long as there are not worsening symptoms and only after being cleared by Health Services.

What does it mean to be placed in quarantine?
 

Students will only be placed in quarantine if they are identified as someone at risk of direct exposure to someone who tested positive for COVID-19. Please note that the University will directly contact any community member who has been determined to be at risk and needs to quarantine. We have had several circumstances where people have decided to unnecessarily quarantine themselves. While anyone is welcome to self-quarantine in their own space or home for their own comfort, this is a personal decision and not required. Students should communicate directly with their faculty and advisors; faculty and staff should contact Human Resources. Individuals abiding by social distancing measures—wearing a mask and maintaining 6 feet of distance—are typically not considered to be at risk.

Students required to quarantine will stay in quarantine for 14 days since the last day of contact with the person who tested positive for COVID-19. Students will also be tested and those with positive results will be moved to isolation. Students who test negative and do not develop symptoms will continue quarantine for 14 days and self-monitor daily. Students will need to remain in their quarantine space—meals will be delivered, classes will be taken remotely, and laundry service will be provided. If you do develop symptoms during your quarantine, you will be tested for COVID-19 and remain in quarantine as directed by Health Services.

Students who are not a known exposure to someone who tested positive for COVID-19, but present to Health Services with symptoms that are suspicious or severe in nature, will also be quarantined until test results come back. Students testing positive will be moved into isolation as directed by Health Services. Students testing negative may stay in quarantine to allow Health Services to monitor symptoms and possibly retest. If symptoms resolve, Health Services staff may release you from the mandatory quarantine.

When should I be extra cautious?

Members of the campus community who are not a known exposure to someone who tested positive for COVID-19, but have mild cold symptoms that have been going on for more than 24 hours (not including chest pain, shortness of breath, or loss of taste/smell), should take additional precautions. Contact Health Services or your health professional if you feel you need a test and stay in your room or home as much as possible. Take additional time to clean shared spaces (bathrooms) or high-touch surfaces (doorknobs). Always practice social distancing, wear a mask, wash your hands, and use sanitizer often.

Can I isolate or quarantine at my own home?

As we move through the semester, we recognize that taking a conservative approach means that at some point, there may be more students in quarantine than we can appropriately accommodate. There are some students, due to a variety of circumstances, who are not able to return home should they need to isolate or quarantine. Students who are required to isolate or quarantine, and are able to safely do so at home, are encouraged to make those arrangements. We will assist students and families in any way we can to create safe and appropriate plans for travel, interim housing, and academics. We are committed to keeping our students, faculty, and staff safe, comfortable, secure, and most of all, healthy.

Again, thank you for your continued partnership. Please visit hartford.edu/healthy-hawks for updates and reach out to covid19@hartford.edu with any additional questions.

Thank you,

Jessica M. Nicklin
Associate Vice President for Student Success
COVID-19 Coordinator

September 16: Fac/Staff Accommodations for Spring 2021

Dear Faculty and Staff,

Although the fall semester has just begun, we are busy making plans for the spring 2021 semester. We continue to recognize some of our employees may be particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 due to their age, underlying health conditions, or other factors. Please see the CDC’s list of high-risk groups.

Here is an update on accommodation requests for the spring:

If you are CURRENTLY APPROVED for an accommodation, you will be receiving a separate communication from HRD, and personnel in that office will work with you to assess extending this request for the spring.

If you need to request a NEW accommodation for the spring, please review the information below and request an appointment with the Office of Human Resources Development (HRD) to discuss your specific situation, documentation requirements, and options. All new requests for accommodation should be directed through HRD following the procedures below. Please do not begin the process with your department chair, dean, or supervisor; they will be notified by HRD if an accommodation is granted.

DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS

The University will continue to follow its established process for disability accommodations, including engaging in the interactive process with faculty and staff with disabilities to determine whether they require reasonable accommodations to perform the essential functions of their job amidst the pandemic. If faculty or staff have a medical condition that could reasonably affect their ability to safely perform their duties on campus, they must request a reasonable accommodation through HRD and go through the interactive process. Based on the information obtained through that process, a determination will be made as to whether the employee qualifies for a reasonable accommodation.

HIGH-RISK CONSIDERATIONS

For employees who may not have a disability, but are otherwise considered “high risk” for serious illness due to COVID-19, the University has established the process below for those faculty and staff to explore the possibility of alternative work arrangements with their supervisors.

  • Employees who are, or will be 65 or older as of June 30, 2021, and wish to work from home should contact HRD before Sept. 30, 2020.
  • Employees whose own underlying health condition increases the risk for serious complications related to COVID-19 (as set forth in CDC guidelines) should contact HRD to discuss the situation no later than Sept. 30, 2020. HRD will notify the appropriate supervisor if the request is granted.
  • Employees who cohabitate with someone who is or will be age 65 or older as of June 30, 2021, or who cohabitate with someone with an underlying health condition that increases the risk for serious complications related to COVID-19, shall contact HRD to discuss the situation by Sept. 30, 2020. HRD will notify the appropriate supervisor of the staff member’s decision.
  • In addition to the above considerations, UHart will grant temporary unpaid administrative leave to any staff member who requests such a leave. Requests should be made to HRD no later than Oct. 15, 2020. HRD shall notify the appropriate supervisor, and address such requests on a semester-by-semester basis.

It is possible that your circumstances could change after these deadlines. If that happens, please contact HRD.

Thank you for your patience—and for all you do, have done, and will do for this university.
 
Fred Sweitzer, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
Jen Conley, Interim Director, Human Resources Development

September 9: Initial Fall Semester Update

Dear Campus Community,

I hope the week is going well and that you have had a chance to enjoy the outdoors; it is beginning to turn ever so gently into a beautiful New England fall.

As I walk around campus, I feel a positive energy. We are adapting pretty well to the complexities of our current reality as we learn and grow together. I have had the opportunity to speak with many of you and fully realize how important it is for our students to be on campus this semester. We are off to a great start and sincerely hope we can sustain that attitude and momentum by staying informed, being cautious, and demonstrating our dedication to keeping each other safe.

The University has launched a COVID-19 Dashboard that will be updated several times each week with additional data points. For now, it displays a cumulative total and a summary of the weekly proactive community testing. The cumulative total combines the results of tests conducted in Health Services, weekly proactive community testing, and positive results reported by students and employees tested off campus. This week, we had zero positives in our weekly proactive testing and a report of six additional student positives cases, adding to the one positive we had last week. All of these students have been appropriately isolated with contacts identified through comprehensive and professional contact tracing. We are offering medical, housing, and academic support to these students as needed.

Our deep concern for safety, security, and sensitivity requires us to go above and beyond the average health requirements. While many schools have enlisted students or academic staff to assist the local health agencies with contact tracing, we have hired 14 registered nurses who work seven days a week to quickly and effectively identify contacts, assess concerns, and monitor health assessments. We have consulted with an environmental health and safety firm and contracted with additional cleaning crews to provide around-the-clock sanitizing in academic and residential common spaces. We are being extremely proactive in our testing, including testing students who present any potential symptoms of COVID-19 in Health Services as well as any potential contacts. Several options exist to ramp up our testing over the next several weeks. The University has also invested and implemented wastewater testing, an unusual precautionary action among our peers. All of these efforts and results will be shared through the online Dashboard, UNotes, and email communications.

Students are doing their part and adjusting to a new way of living and learning on campus. The current community rules and expectations are not what any of us would choose to implement for our preferred student experience, but—for now—they are necessary. We look forward to revisiting and making updates in line with the health of our University community. We have added facilities and public safety student ambassadors, have staff performing regular patrols, and are grateful for the support of the incredible student staff in residential life to monitor our collective and individual behavior and challenges.

However, even with this positive news, we continue to receive hundreds of anonymous tips about mask usage concerns through the LiveSafe app each week. Many of you are asking the University to give your friends and peers formal warnings. This is simply not possible or sustainable to this degree—the staffing necessary would be overwhelming. Instead, I am asking each of you, and specifically our students, to be your own best advocates and safety ambassadors. If you see someone wearing a mask below their nose, nicely remind them it should be pulled up or simply motion to their mask. If your friends are taking their masks off when they shouldn’t or aren’t following social distancing requirements, please be honest; tell them you really need and want to be here all semester. Their behavior could contribute to an outbreak of infection, making it impossible for us to complete the semester on campus. If you are one of the students we are receiving pictures of, your friends want you to wear your mask and take this seriously! Please make this simple effort to help protect you, your friends and family, and our community.

There are no guarantees in these uncertain times; however, as each new scenario unfolds, I see our campus team putting into motion plans developed over many months to keep us safe. These are unprecedented situations, but I can say with complete confidence that we have implemented every precaution and measure at our disposal—without consideration for expense—to create and help maintain a safe campus for our community. Please continue to do your personal best every day and expect the same from those around you. I am proud of what we, and what you, have accomplished so far. Keep going! We can do this.

Thank you,

Greg Woodward
President

August Updates

August 27: Student Engagement and Events

Dear Students,

The Office of Student Engagement and Inclusion (OSEI) welcomes you to the University of Hartford. We spent the summer reimagining campus life and the ways you socialize and participate in activities. Life has changed for all of us over the last few months, but we remain committed to helping you engage with others in a fun and safe way.

I encourage you to read the complete Event and Engagement Policy online, but here are some main points:

Events

Although they may look different, there will be campus events this semester. Many of these will be virtual, but there are some events that can be outdoors, if social distancing is possible and crowd size limits are followed. Attendance and participation in events will be limited to members of the UHart community.

One of our first events of the semester is tomorrow’s March on Washington, which includes a viewing of the live Washington, D.C. gathering and a powerful march throughout campus. Social distancing guidelines will be enforced, and masks are required.

Clubs and Organizations

You can meet with your clubs and organizations this semester. We encourage you to hold regular meetings through virtual platforms, but in-person meetings can be held by following strict guidelines. Please see the policy for more specific information about reserving space, or contact sca@hartford.edu with questions.

Club Sports, Intramurals, and SGA Performance Groups

Unfortunately, club sports, intramurals, and SGA performance groups will not be able to practice, compete, or perform this fall semester. We know this is disappointing, but it is the safest choice.

Members may still gather for meetings by following the guidance found here. Clubs that have traditionally held in-person practices/rehearsals should contact the Office of Student Engagement and Inclusion at sei@hartford.edu for consideration and potential approval of in-person events. Each request will be handled on a case-by-case basis and will depend on the nature of the activity.

Sports Center

The Sports Center will open its second-floor fitness facility to undergraduate students beginning on Tuesday, Sept. 8.  Weekday hours will be 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 9 p.m. The facility will close from 2 to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday to allow for deep cleaning and sanitization procedures. Weekend hours will be 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.  

Due to the potential high rate of virus transmission, membership locker rooms will be closed this semester as will indoor and outdoor courts. Towels and locks will not be available. The pool will not be open this semester.

Masks will be required in the building at all times. There will be a door thermometer at the entrance to serve as a temperature check. Also in place will be a monitoring system that will help Sports Center staff track capacity limits within the fitness center in accordance with Connecticut state guidelines. 

As we navigate the challenges ahead, please know that the University will be here for you. Thank you for your commitment to caring for yourself and for all your fellow Hawks.

Sincerely,
Torshia Anderson
Executive Director, Student Engagement and Inclusion

August 27: Important Health and Safety Reminders

Dear Students,

Now that we are into our first week of classes, please remember to follow all health and safety rules and policies, including new protocols for dining services, that are in place for our safety.

Health and Safety Reminders

If you have not submitted your negative test result, you must do so before moving onto campus or, if you are commuting, before attending class. You must follow all posted protocols when eating in any dining facility on campus. Face masks are required when you are not in your personal living space. Whenever possible, keep six feet of distance between you and others who you do not live with, especially indoors. Remember to complete your daily health screening on LiveSafe before coming to campus, or before going to class if you live on campus. Participate in our contact tracing and random testing programs, and obey quarantine and isolation requirements. And, of course, wash your hands.

Commons and GSU

Yesterday, for health and safety reasons, Dining Services had to unfortunately pause food service in the Commons because not all students were following the social distancing guidelines set in place.

As a result, the Commons and GSU will be reducing the seating capacity to one person per table and moving a majority of their operation to a grab-and-go format. I understand that this may be inconvenient for some, but it will remain this way until student behavior is in line with dining expectations. The Dining Services team has been incredibly student focused and we need your help in keeping their employees and our community safe.

We also ask you to be respectful of our hardworking grounds crew as you use the grab-and-go options. Please put your trash in receptacles and leave your location clean and litter free.

Our COVID-19 policies are in place to help ensure we are able to stay safe and stay on campus; everyone needs to follow these policies. If you have questions about safe dining, please visit the Healthy Hawks website or speak with any Dining Services staff member.

Guest Policy

In addition, it is critical that you follow our guest policy. I know this is particularly difficult, but it is necessary for the safety of our campus community and our neighbors, and our ability to continue to offer an in-person, residential experience. As referenced in my letters to the community on Aug. 11 and Aug. 19, guests are not permitted in the residence halls. Only the residents assigned to a room or an apartment can be in that space. Alleged violations will be documented and referred to the student conduct process. Separate from the student conduct process, interim measures including interim suspension could be put in place as soon as the next day after the alleged incident is reported.

I am happy to see that many of you are socializing in our new outdoor gathering spaces. That’s what they are there for! But please remember, mask and social distancing rules still apply. To make outdoor gatherings a little easier for you to navigate, we are painting grids on the Village lawn as a visual reminder to social distance in small groups.

If you need a refresher on any of our COVID-19 health and safety guidelines, you can find them all on the Healthy Hawks website. They will also be covered in the EverFI COVID Course you are required to complete. (You received an email from EverFI with instructions.)

Reporting Violations

It is our hope that you will remind one another to put on masks, stay six feet apart, and follow all other rules. As part of our pledge, you have the ability to remind community members to wear masks and be socially distant. For behavior that is belligerent or simply too large of an issue for you to manage, please use LiveSafe to report a violation. Go to the app, click “Report Tips,” and then “COVID-19 Concerns.” These tips can be anonymous, but should be submitted in a timely fashion. Reports that are submitted hours or days later may affect our ability to address the alleged concern.

Thank you.

Aaron Isaacs
Dean of Students 

August 19: Student Behavior Expectations

Dear Students,

We are only a few short days away from returning this fall semester and we are excited to welcome you back to campus!

As a University community, we have worked diligently to come together and physically create a safe place for you to begin this semester. Today, I am writing to reiterate that this fall is going to be different from previous years—it has to be. Life on and off campus will not be what you are used to or, if you are a new student, what you may envision as a typical college experience. There are new rules, policies, and expectations that you will have to learn, adjust to, and follow—both on and off campus. These are necessary for the safety of our students, faculty, staff, families, and the larger community.

You will continue to learn about these measures, and more, when you complete your online module from EverFi. We also ask you to read all COVID-related policies and guidelines on our Keeping Hawks Healthy website

However, nothing is more critical than the shared sense of responsibility we must take on to keep our community healthy. This is something that we all must commit to cultivating, as a collective, through our decisions and actions; it is this sense of social responsibility that needs to become our “new normal” if we are to continue to operate this fall. COVID-19 will be a factor in our ability to deliver an in-person college experience now and for the foreseeable future. How big the impact is will be up to all of us, based on our commitment to protecting ourselves and others. That is why we have adopted the Let’s Keep Hawks Healthy Pledge.

It is hard to ignore what is happening at other institutions around the county. Some have already opened and are now in the process of closing due to the choices their community members have made. My intent with this letter is not to scare or shame you into complying with these new expectations. Rather, I want to challenge all of us to embrace this new normal together, by holding each other accountable for our decisions and actions. Remaining on campus this semester will take a monumental effort from all of us, but I trust that this educational experience—your educational experience—is as important to you as it is to all of us.

I do believe a majority of students have already made the decision to abide by the new policies. Others may need some guidance on how to adhere to the new reality, and we are here to assist you with that. Unfortunately, there will be a small portion of community members for whom this responsibility will prove to be too great. We know how easily the virus can spread and we know people can be carriers without experiencing symptoms. The actions of even a small number of community members with risky behavior have the potential to put a full in-person semester in jeopardy for all of us.

I will be as transparent as possible; students found responsible for violating the University’s COVID-19-related policies (i.e. throwing parties, hosting gatherings, conducting themselves in a manner that endangers the health and safety of the community) will be removed from campus and will not receive a refund for room and board. Trust me when I say that I am not excited about this hardline. In a normal semester, we would have the opportunity to engage students in more educational-based outcomes and a series of steps or remedies, as we always do. However, the health and safety of our campus is the priority. There will not be exceptions. If you make poor choices that endanger others—on or off campus—you could change the outcome for many.

Everyone will have to be intentional and thoughtful about the choices we make each and every day. It is my sincere hope that you and all members of the University community will make decisions and take actions only with each other’s health and safety at the forefront.

We will be hosting a town hall ton Thursday, Aug. 20, from 7 to 8 p.m. to give you an opportunity to hear from myself, Residential Life, Public Safety, and Health Services about these new expectations for campus life and how to engage with each other safely. Please click here to register.

Thank you for rising to the challenge of embracing the new normal of caring for one another as a UHart community. Let’s truly keep all Hawks healthy.

Sincere regards,

Aaron

August 18: Testing Update and Health Screenings

Dear Students,

Thank you to those who have submitted their COVID-19 test results. As a reminder, you need to show documentation of a negative test that was taken 14 days prior to moving in if you are a residential student, or before attending class if you are a commuter. Please see our website for specific testing requirements, including how to send us your results. There have been some FDA updates this past week, broadening your options for acceptable tests.

Remember, no test = no key. Please make sure that your name, date, type of test, and results are included on your submission. Arriving with a test result on site (and not pre-loading your test results to our secure portal), may result in delays during move-in.

Daily Health Screenings

In addition to testing, the daily self-monitoring of your health is a key part of our efforts to keep you and our campus community safe. All students, employees, and visitors are required to complete a COVID-19 screening survey on our LiveSafe app before arriving on campus for the day, or, if you live on campus, before going to class.

The screening survey consists of a few questions, such as whether you are experiencing any unusual COVID-19 symptoms, live with or have been exposed to anyone with a confirmed or suspected case, or if you have tested positive for COVID-19. Your answers to the questions should be submitted to the best of your knowledge and based on how you are feeling that day. You will then receive one of two responses:

  • A Green Check on your screen approves you to go to class and to participate in activities.
  • A Red X on your screen means you cannot go to class. Stay in your room, or off-campus if you are a commuter. Someone from our Health Team will contact you to follow up. The Health Team may ask you to see a Health Care Provider for further evaluation or determine it is safe for you to leave your residence.

Please visit our website to view the Live Safe app and to download it. If you do not use a smartphone, you can access an online version on a computer. Please print the results for verification if possible.

If You Become Ill After Completing the Daily Screening

Please be aware of your health throughout the day. If you experience the following symptoms, outside of ordinary symptoms you might typically experience (e.g., seasonal allergies, chronic migraines, sore muscles after working out, etc.), please contact Health Services at 860.768.6601.

  • Fever (100.4° or higher) or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

*Please note: Health Services is not taking walk-ins. All visits will be by appointment.

Quarantine, Isolation, and Contact Tracing

If you are arriving from a travel advisory state, you must quarantine for two weeks upon arriving to Connecticut. If you are identified throughout the semester as having close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19, you will also be asked to quarantine, which means you must stay in your living space, other than very limited occasions to get food. You may attend class remotely. Learn more.
 
All students who test positive for COVID-19 must isolate themselves. Ideally, you will be able to go home via private transportation. In the event this is impossible, residential students will be able to isolate in rooms on campus. Isolation means you cannot leave the room; food will be delivered to you. We will also check in on you via telemedicine. Learn more. You must also participate in our contact tracing program in order to help us prevent the spread of COVID-19. Learn more.
 
We care about you and your health and are committed to helping you stay safe this semester. If you have any questions, please email covid19@hartford.edu.
 
Thank you.

Health Services

August 17: A Message from Provost Sweitzer

Dear Faculty Colleagues,
 
I intended to send this email on Friday morning, but the best laid plans…………
 
It has been quite a busy week as we try to finalize our academic and health and safety preparations for the opening of school.  I know that many of you have had questions and concerns in both areas and I hope most of them have been addressed.  I also know that this is an emotional time as we enter another chapter in the COVID saga and while information and training may help, they don’t address all the emotional concerns.  I am not going to try and tackle all that in one email but do want to address them all over the next several days.
 
So this email is about academic preparation, and communication with your students, since there are some ideas you may want to implement in the next week or so.  Future emails will address some health and safety protocols and how you can encourage and enforce them.  For now, if you missed the presentation in the Open Senate meeting on Thursday and want to know as much as you can about our preparations, I suggest you watch the recording of the session.  

Turning now to academic preparation, there has been a lot of activity this week in workshops and on the Facebook page, UHart Teaching with Technology.  If you missed the session by Jim Lang on Thursday, I highly recommend it.  You can find it, all the college sessions, and the training sessions for college trainers at the CTEI web site; https://Bit.ly/uhart-ctei

You all know that engagement and community are keys to student success, and that the COVID environment presents some obstacles in that regard.  Here’s a few things I have gleaned from reading, listening, Facebook, and workshops.

  • You can start now, before classes begin.  Send your students an email letting them know you are looking forward to working with them, giving them some information about the course, and asking them to share information with you, as they are comfortable.  Information they might want includes the format you are using, any hardware or software they need to participate when they are not Face to Face (and don’t assume they know about Blackboard), a reminder to contact CSS if they don’t have something they need, and, in the case of A/B models, who should be attending the first day of classes (the A group or the B group), what your virtual office hours will be, and how they can contact you over the next week or so.  I encourage you to include not just information, but an encouraging and supportive tone.  Finally, if you are able to post your syllabus and other materials now, do that and invite students to check them out.  I also encourage you to find out something about your students.  You can use a survey, or a writing prompt, or whatever works for you, but knowing who they are, why they are taking the course, and what they are excited and nervous about will be extra important this fall.

  • Speaking of syllabi, the challenge of writing a good syllabus is complicated by all the COVID factors.  I hate for syllabi to just be a list of what they need to do and all the rules they are supposed to follow, since it’s also an early opportunity to get them excited about the course, but there is a lot they need to know about things like entry and exit protocols, face coverings and other PPEs, how best to remote in, and (if you have thought about this yet) what we will do if we need to take the class 100% remote.
And then there is the first day or week of class.  Everything I read and remember tells me that these days are crucial in establishing connection and setting a good tone.  I suspect that, especially for first year students, their feelings of disruption, nervousness, and even disconnection will be more pronounced than in a normal semester.  I encourage you not to just plow into content, but to take some time to establish connection, talk about the class format, answer questions, and so on.  And encourage patience.  Students are going to be late sometimes, class may not start on time, there will be tech glitches, and depending on what technology you are using you may need to spend time helping them learn.  CSS will be able to direct them to general resources, but some may need individual attention.
 
In closing, I am always thinking of new ways to tell you how much I appreciate, respect, and value all the work you are doing for your students and for the university.  I don’t have a new one, so I will just say thank you.  Thank you.
 
Fred Sweitzer

August 12: Travel Advisory Update

Dear Students,

We are personally reaching out to students and families enrolled from states currently included on the state’s travel advisory list. Please know that we are here to do everything we can to assist and support our students while strictly following the Executive Order to preserve the health and well-being of our community.

As we have communicated, a Connecticut Travel Advisory is putting restrictions on visitors from dozens of states. The Governor’s Executive Order has evolved, leading to a major change for many of our students: If you are coming from one of those states, you will have to quarantine for 14 days upon arriving in Connecticut. Under state regulations, a negative test taken prior to coming to Connecticut is no longer a substitute for quarantining.

All students can begin their quarantine in a variety of ways while limiting activities and movement during this time. If you are able to stay in Connecticut with family and friends—or in any state that is not a part of the current advisory list—please do so as soon as possible. Alternatively, you may choose to begin your quarantine at a hotel of your choosing. We have secured discounted rates for students and families at regional hotel partners that can be found here. You will need to provide the University with a completed Connecticut Travel Health Form to show that you have satisfied the quarantine requirement before moving in or attending class. You also still need to provide a negative diagnostic COVID-19 test taken within 14 days prior to moving in

Residential students may start their quarantine at a location in Connecticut, or another state not on the advisory list, and, with University permission, complete the remaining time when you move in. We are working as quickly as we can to ready our residential facilities for move-in and residential students from states on the advisory list will be able to move in on Friday, Aug. 21, with prior approval. At that time, we will verify where you are within your required quarantine period. Again, you still need to provide a negative diagnostic COVID-19 test taken within 14 days prior to moving in. The University will provide room and board for this additional time on campus; there will not be any additional expense to you if you move in early to begin your quarantine. Please note, if you are traveling from an advisory state and your roommate is not, you will need to complete your quarantine in a different, temporary housing assignment. We will provide you with the details prior to move-in.

As a reminder, students quarantining on campus will be able to pick up food from a designated location while wearing a mask and practicing social distancing, or have food delivered from local establishments. Per the current guidelines, limited numbers of students can share bathrooms; cleaning expectations and schedules will be shared. You will be able to be outside if wearing a mask and social distancing. The guidance also states that you should not leave campus and limit your movement in the area.

Students will need to attend classes remotely until they have completed the full 14-day quarantine. Your instructors will be informed if you are beginning your classes remotely. If you have any concerns about going to class remotely, you should contact your advisor or the Center for Student Success. 

We are asking students from advisory states to let us know of your plans as soon as possible using this form.

Thank you for your continued understanding as we work through these challenging logistics together. We will continue to share additional details about our quarantine and residential policies, as well as move-in during the coming week. In the meantime, if you have any questions, please contact COVID19@hartford.edu.

Thank you,
Office of Residential Life

August 11: Visitor and Guest Guidelines and Accessing Campus

Dear Students,

We can once again share positive news about Connecticut’s efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19. Hospitalizations are down and the state has one of the lowest COVID-19 infection rates in the country. At the University of Hartford, we are confident in our ability to safely reopen campus later this month. Whether we are able to remain open is up to all of us.

Being part of the UHart community means we must all do our part to stay healthy; protect our classmates, colleagues, and neighbors; and support and help each other. Getting tested for COVID-19, wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, washing our hands, and following other health and safety guidelines are all important steps. We have also shared our Let’s Keep Hawks Healthy Pledge to make a commitment to keep each other safe. But there are other ways we need to adapt in order to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

Visitor/Guest Guidelines and Accessing Campus

We have traditionally prided ourselves on being an open campus, but enhanced health and safety protocols mean we have to make significant changes to our visitor/guest policy this fall. Please see the entire policy on our website. Following are some key points:

Access to campus will be largely limited to current students, faculty, and staff. Others who are permitted on campus include:

Spaces on campus that typically welcome the public (Harrison Libraries, performance spaces, galleries, the Campus Store, etc.) will not be open for visitors/guests. There will not be any public events on campus this semester.

Visitor/Guests of Students, Faculty, and Staff

We are unable to allow any personal visitors or guests to campus, in the residence halls, or elsewhere. There may be some cases in which immediate family members need to come to campus. In those instances, they will be required to submit a request form at least 24 hours in advance. Early drop-off and move-in periods are exceptions to this rule.

Health Screenings

Anyone who is coming to campus must first complete a brief COVID-19 screening survey via our LiveSafe platform. Please visit our website to learn more, download the LiveSafe mobile app, or access the online version.

Masks

As a reminder, masks or face coverings must be worn when in the presence of others and in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (common work spaces, classrooms, conference rooms, etc.).

Residential Life

There is no doubt that life in our residential neighborhoods will be different this fall. Please remember that the changes we are making are for your safety, and for the safety of everyone on campus and in the surrounding community.

We will have a no-visitor/no-guest policy within our residence halls. That means only students living in a specific housing unit (room, apartment, or suite) will be allowed inside that space. Residential buildings are open only to those students who live in that building (other than the first floor classroom of Hawk Hall). Please see our full residential life policy on our website. It is important that you read it in order to get a complete picture of the rules, expectations, and possible repercussions of not following the policy.

We realize campus life will be more restrictive in some areas, but we are organizing activities and enhancing and arranging outdoor spaces so that you can safely socialize and engage with each other. We know the residential experience is extremely important to you and we are doing everything we can to maintain some sense of normalcy.

Opportunities for Questions and Feedback

The Division of Student Success is here to support you and we are looking for ways to best accomplish that goal.

We set up a survey for you to share what resources you most need, what your biggest concerns are, and other things that are important to you. We encourage you all to complete the survey by Monday, Aug. 17.

We also invite you to attend a virtual town hall meeting on Thursday, Aug. 13, at 8 p.m. This will be an opportunity for you to ask questions, share your concerns, and review important information before coming to campus.

Join meeting on Aug. 13 (Password: UHart.) Registration is not required.

Our faculty and staff are thrilled to welcome you to campus. While the experience won’t necessarily be what you are used to or were expecting, with your help, and with all the precautions we are putting in place, we can have an engaging, enjoyable, successful semester.

If you have any questions about living on campus, please email Residential Life at reslife@hartford.edu. If you have other questions about the University’s response to COVID-19, please email COVID19@hartford.edu.

Thank you,

Aaron Isaacs
Dean of Students

August 9: LiveSafe Fac/Staff Health Screenings

Dear Faculty and Staff,

The daily self-monitoring of your health is a key part of our efforts to keep you and our campus community safe. All employees, students, and visitors will be required to complete a COVID-19 screening survey on our LiveSafe app before arriving to campus for the day. That screening is now up and ready for you to use.

Please visit our website to learn how to download the LiveSafe app, if you have not done so already. If you do not have a smartphone, there is an online version can be accessed on a computer. You may want to print the results for verification. Please contact your supervisor if you do not have access to technology and need to fill out a paper survey.

The screening survey consists of a few questions, such as whether you are experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms, live with or have been exposed to anyone with a confirmed or suspected case, or if you have tested positive for COVID-19. Your answers to the questions should be submitted to the best of your knowledge and how you are feeling that day. Based on your answers, you will receive one of two responses:

  • A Green Check on your screen approves you to come to campus.
  • A Red X on your screen will direct you to stay off campus. You must then notify Human Resources at 860.768.4666 or hrd@hartford.edu, as well as your supervisor. Please also contact your physician.

The University has been using the LiveSafe app for several years as the campus safety platform. It has been a critical resource for students and employees to access for help during an emergency, report a safety issue or concern, or request an in-person security escort.

We are committed to everyone’s safety on campus. Thank you for your cooperation and your help in keeping our community safe.

Thank you,

Department of Public Safety

August 7: Testing Requirement Update

Dear Students,

We know that State and University testing requirements are top of mind right now. Here are some reminders and clarifications as you make your final plans for testing. We also invite you to attend a virtual town hall meeting on Thursday, Aug. 13, at 8 p.m. This will be an opportunity for you to ask questions, share your concerns, and review important information before coming to campus.

Join meeting. Password: UHart
Registration is not required.

Testing Requirement

All students, including those living on campus and commuters, will be required to be tested prior to the start of the semester.

Residential students: You must show documentation of a negative COVID-19 test that was taken within 14 days prior to moving in. You do not need to have a negative test to participate in the early drop-off of belongings.

We accept tests that diagnose a current COVID-19 infection. These are also known as molecular tests, viral tests, or RT-PCR tests. We do not accept antibody tests. Please see the FDA’s website for more information about the specific kinds of tests.

Upload your results to our secure form. (Please note: This link has been updated since the prior form was sent on Tuesday, Aug 4.) You must sign in with your UHart email and password.

If your results are negative, you will be able to move in as scheduled. If you test positive, you should stay home until you are cleared by a physician. You will not be able to access your room without a documented negative test. No test = No key.

Commuters (including graduate students taking classes on campus): You must show documentation of a negative diagnostic COVID-19 test that was taken within 14 days prior to coming to campus.

We accept tests that diagnose a current COVID-19 infection. These are also known as molecular tests, viral tests, or RT-PCR tests. We do not accept antibody tests. Please see the FDA’s website for more information about the specific kinds of tests.

Upload your results to our secure form. (Please note: This link has been updated since the prior form was sent on Tuesday, Aug 4.) You must sign in with your UHart email and password.

If your results are negative, you will be able to come to campus and go to class. If you unexpectedly test positive, you should stay home until you are cleared by a physician. You will not be able to come to campus or go to class without a documented negative test.

If you are taking all of your classes online and do not plan to come to campus, you do not need a test.

Accessing Tests

We have heard from some families that, depending on your home state, finding a test may be difficult. Here are some suggestions that may make obtaining a test easier for you, including having a test mailed to your home.

If you live in Connecticut: We recommend going through Hartford HealthCare, our on-campus health service provider. They have nine drive-up testing centers in the state and results are typically ready within three days. If you have questions about Hartford HealthCare’s testing, please call its Community Care Center at 833.621.0600. You may also visit Connecticut’s COVID-19 Testing Locator to find additional testing locations.

If you live outside of Connecticut: Availability and criteria for who can obtain a test vary from state to state. We recommend visiting the Department of Health & Human Services website to find information for your state. The site also includes details on low-cost or free testing.

At-Home Test: We are partnering with Vault, a provider of COVID-19 tests that you can take at home. Please visit their website to learn more about the process and costs. We are unable to accept other mail-in or at-home tests because many are not FDA approved.

Ongoing Testing

Each week, between 5 and 10 percent of residential students will be selected for asymptomatic COVID-19 testing. If you are selected, you will be notified by email. This test is not optional. You must report to the on-campus testing site as instructed. This test will be administered at no cost to you.

Currently, there is no ongoing testing expectation for non-residential students. Commuters and graduate students taking classes on campus may be asked to obtain an asymptomatic test due to contact tracing efforts when risk of exposure is considered high.

Traveling from a Restricted State
 

We will continue to share additional details of our quarantine policies in accordance with the State of Connecticut Travel Advisory and any additional updates or changes.

Please continue to check hartford.edu/healthy-hawks for updates and FAQs. If you have any questions, please email COVID19@hartford.edu.

Thank you.

Student Health Services

August 4: Testing Requirements and Travel Restrictions

The below message was also forwarded to all faculty and staff on August 4, 2020

 

Dear Students,

Thank you for your patience as we continue to work through the changing Connecticut state regulations and health guidance on COVID-19 testing. We have several important updates to share with you.

Testing Requirement

All students, including those living on campus and commuters, will be required to be tested prior to the start of the semester.

Residential students: As a reminder, you must show documentation of a negative diagnostic COVID-19 test that was taken within 14 days prior to moving in. Please upload your results to our secure form (must log in with UHart email and password). If your results are negative, you will be able to move in as scheduled.

If you test positive, you should stay home until you are cleared by a physician. You will not be able to access your room without a documented negative test. No test = No key.

Commuters (including graduate students taking classes on campus): You must show documentation of a negative diagnostic COVID-19 test that was taken within 14 days prior to coming to campus. Please upload your results to our secure form (must log in with UHart email and password). If your results are negative, you will be able to come to campus and go to class.

If you test positive, you should stay home until you are cleared by a physician. You will not be able to come to campus or go to class without a documented negative test.

Accessing Tests

We have heard from some families that, depending on your home state, finding a test may be difficult. Here are some suggestions that may make obtaining a test easier for you.

If you live in Connecticut: We recommend going through Hartford HealthCare, our on-campus health service provider. They have nine drive-up testing centers in the state and results are typically ready within three days. If you have questions about Hartford HealthCare’s testing, please call its Community Care Center at 833.621.0600. You may also visit Connecticut’s COVID-19 Testing Locator to find additional testing locations.

If you live outside of Connecticut: Availability and criteria for who can obtain a test vary from state to state. We recommend visiting the Department of Health & Human Services website to find information for your state. The site also includes details on low-cost or free testing.

At-Home Test: We are partnering with Vault, a provider of COVID-19 tests that you can take at home. Please visit the Vault website to learn more about the process and costs. We are unable to accept other mail-in or at-home tests because many are not FDA approved.

Ongoing Testing

Each week, between 5 and 10 percent of residential students will be selected for asymptomatic COVID-19 testing. If you are selected, you will be notified by email. This test is not optional. You must report to the on-campus testing site as instructed. This test will be administered at no cost to you.
 
Currently, there is no ongoing testing expectation for non-residential students. Commuters and graduate students taking classes on campus may be asked, as capacity allows, to obtain an asymptomatic test due to contact tracing efforts when risk of exposure is considered high.

Traveling from a Restricted State

As we have communicated, a Connecticut Travel Advisory is putting restrictions on visitors from dozens of states and Puerto Rico. The Governor’s Executive Order has evolved over the last week, which is leading to a major change for our many of students: If you are coming from one of those states, you will have to quarantine for 14 days upon arriving in Connecticut. Under state regulations, a negative test taken prior to coming to Connecticut is no longer a substitute for quarantining. You must also fill out the Connecticut Travel Health Form. Please visit CT.gov for a list of the states, but keep in mind that it is subject to change due to health conditions across the country. International students should follow the guidance outlined on the CDC website, but in most cases will also quarantine for 14 days upon arriving in Connecticut.

We know this is not the way you want to start your fall semester, but we must all follow the Executive Order to preserve the health and well-being of our community. Residential students may complete their quarantine in University housing or off campus, and are expected to limit activities and movement during this time. If you are quarantining on campus, you may pick up food from the University Commons while wearing a mask and practicing social distancing, or have food delivered. Per the current guidelines, limited numbers of students can share bathrooms and cleaning expectations and schedules will be shared. You will also be able to be outside if wearing a mask and social distancing. We will continue to share additional details of our quarantine and residential policies, as well as how this change will impact classes for students in quarantine.

Please continue to check hartford.edu/healthy-hawks for updates and FAQs. If you have any questions, please email COVID19@hartford.edu

Thank you,
Student Health Services

August 4: Returning to Work

Dear Faculty and Staff,

As we get closer to reopening campus on August 10, I would like to share some of the expectations HRD and University leadership have for reporting to work on campus.

Working on Campus

As I shared with supervisors last week, many of our offices are student-facing or require in-person business operations during the academic year and must be open and staffed on campus in order to fulfill their mission. As communicated in the Return to Work Guide, phased staffing may be required to meet social distancing requirements. Your supervisor was asked to assess staffing based on business needs and their ability to control and manage specific work environments. If your supervisor is making such plans, they will communicate those to you.

As a reminder, all employees, students, and visitors will be required to participate in daily health screenings via our LiveSafe app before coming to campus. If you log any of the following symptoms you should notify your supervisor and HRD that you will not be at work. Then, contact your doctor:

  • Fever (100.4° or higher) or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

The health screening will be up and running soon; please click to learn more about LiveSafe and/or to download it.

You will also be required to complete an online training before starting work on campus. The training will walk you through campus health and safety guidelines put in place to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. A link to that training will be available soon.

Working Remotely

There are some offices on campus that are not student-facing and having employees on campus is not necessary for their business purpose. As I shared with supervisors last week, in these cases, employees should continue to work remotely to the extent possible. This would allow for social distancing on campus, and saves resources for our facilities team, Public Safety, and other colleagues who must be on campus. Supervisors were empowered to make the decision that is best for the department’s business functions and the safety of your department and colleagues on campus. They will be communicating that decision with you.

If you have any questions do not hesitate to contact Human Resources Development at hrd@hartford.edu.

Thank you,

Jen Conley

August 3: A Message from Provost Sweitzer

Dear Faculty Colleagues,
 
Well, it’s August and that means students are coming soon.  It has been a busy summer for all of us as we prepare to help students succeed in an environment filled with challenges; thank you for all you have done and continue to do.  I know there have been a lot of emails, some of them long, and it’s hard to keep track of them and find them for reference.  We had a web page where all the communications were housed, but in the transition to our COVID reopening plans it got a bit obsolete.  It is being updated as we speak and you can find it here.

This email is a bit of a hodge podge of items pertaining to our academic challenges and resources to meet them.  You can use the links below to jump to the topics you want to look at.  There are also some attachments that pertain to some of these topics, so you can wait to decide whether to open them.

Zoom and Other Video Conferencing Tools
Recording
Technology Demonstration/Practice
Making Content Accessible
Don’t Forget About Equity
Helping Students Acclimate
What About Tests?
The Most Important Thing

A Shameless Plug for Blackboard
I know that not all of you like Blackboard or find it completely suitable, but please consider using it anyway.  Many of the tools and tips in this and other emails are going to work a lot more smoothly if you do, as they can be seamlessly tied in.  Basic and advanced Blackboard resources are on the FCLD web site. You can still sign up to attend the 8-session Teaching Online 101 series running from August 3-August 14 from 11-noon. Or you can just attend a few relevant sessions.  See the FCLD website

Zoom and Other Video Conferencing Tools
Most of you will be using some sort of video conferencing tool if you are using a hybrid or remote approach (reminder, a remote approach is when the class is on-line, but taking place synchronously at specified times).  The university supports WebEx, Skype for Business, and Blackboard Collaborate and we have recently decided to make Zoom available for those of you who want to use it.  We have individual Zoom licenses and if you want one, please contact Information Technology Services at its@hartford.edu.  Resources for effective use of all these tools can be found on the FCLD website

Your students may also need help learning to use these technologies.  The Center for Student Success is developing a support page that will include tutorials and/or instructions.
 
Recording
Most of you will want to record your class sessions, or at least portions of them.  All learning spaces will be outfitted with a webcam, but remember that a webcam has to be tied into one of the video conferencing platforms.  And you will need to start the recording when you begin class.  You can move around the room and the microphone will still pick you up, but if you would like a headset, we are happy to provide you with one to use in all your classes. Contact its@hartford.edu.  And in case you are concerned about students distributing the recording, please see the attached policy statement, which I encourage you to include in your syllabus
 
Technology Demonstration/Practice
In case you missed it in UNotes, ITS has set up a Demonstration Room to showcase hybrid learning technologies available for faculty to use this fall. Available technologies will include: 
  • Web camera 
  • Wireless Headset 
  • Document Camera 
  • Touch screen display for annotation 
  • Wacom writing tablet 
  • Ensemble Anthem Lecture Capture 
  • WebEx/Zoom/Collaborate Web Conferencing 
You have to sign up for a session and they are filling up fast; we will try to do this again the following week. Email helpdesk@hartford.edu to schedule a session.  
 
Making Content Accessible
Whether you are teaching face to face, hybrid, remote, or on-line I urge you to make as much course content as you possibly can available on-line.  Remember that some students are electing to take all their classes remotely, and we have promised them they can do so (unless a face to face course cannot be taken remotely by anyone).  And, students may find themselves unable to attend class sessions for some period of time.  And of course there is the possibility that we will have to send everyone home at some point.
 
Don’t Forget About Equity
Equity and inclusion are important concerns in any instructional setting, but there are particular equity issues to think about when using on-line platforms and methods.  The attached rubric, adapted from one developed by Peralta Community College, is a clear and useful resource.
 
Helping Students Acclimate
Another reason to use Blackboard is it makes it very easy to communicate with all students enrolled in your class.  Think about contacting them a week or two before classes begin, and post your syllabus if it’s ready.  Let them know what kind of approach you are using (remote, hybrid, etc.), how you will be implementing that approach and what technology you will be employing.  Give them some resources to try things out, if you can, and let them know where they can go for help.  The more problems you can solve, or get solved, before class begins and the more you can allay the fear of the unknown, the better.
 
What About Tests?
If you are teaching remotely or on-line, you may be concerned about how to administer tests and quizzes.  And if you are face to face or hybrid, you may have some students who are not able to come to class and have to take their test in another way.  Some of you, I know, are worried about cheating.  Given the likelihood of remote students participating in both hybrid and face to face courses, some faculty may now be wondering how they will fairly administer exams when students won’t all be in the same places at the same time.  One possible solution would be to administer exams through the Blackboard Tests feature.  All students can take the exam/test, online, during a scheduled class period. Instructors with concerns about students sharing exam questions or online students using resources while taking exams can consider using additional tools within Blackboard in concert with the test feature.  Lockdown Browser and/or Respondus Monitor provide some degree of “virtual proctoring” reducing the likelihood behaviors associated with “cheating.”  Although these solutions are imperfect, they are available options.  
 
Please do note that these “proctoring” options require that a test be created in Blackboard.  Support for how to create tests and assessments in Blackboard can be found at the FCLD Teaching with Blackboard page.  Click on Assessments and Assignments for how to create a test. 
 
Once a test has been made in Blackboard, an instructor can add the use of Lockdown Browser and/or Respondus Monitor to reduce sharing of test questions/answers or using digital or other resources during an exam.  Lockdown Browser and Respondus Monitor support can also found on the FCLD link above.  Click on Respondus Lockdown Browser & Monitor for “how to” info.
 
The Most Important Thing
As was true in the spring, the keys to success in the fall are going to be connection, patience, flexibility, adaptability, and kindness.  Students, especially the kind of students who are attracted to the University of Hartford, thrive on connection.  It can be achieved in any delivery system and I urge you to make it a goal.  The more connected students feel, the more likely they are to persist AND to take up the mantle of responsibility as we try to keep one another safe and healthy.  There will be technical glitches for you and your students.  As we acclimate to the new realities of entering and exiting classrooms, using elevators one person at a time, and so on, students are going to be late on occasion.  Students are going to forget their masks.  Students who are remoting in may be stuck in the residence halls, or at home under a variety of circumstances.  Be patient.  Be kind to them, and to yourself. 
 
As always, please feel free to be in touch with questions or concerns.  I will send more information and resources as they become available.  Thank you again.
 
Fred
 
 
H. Frederick Sweitzer, EdD
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

July Updates

July 23: Testing, Move-In, and More

Dear Students,

We are happy to share that health conditions in Connecticut remain stable and our state continues to have one of the lowest infection rates in the country. This means that with safety precautions and protocols in place, we are still on track for a safe reopening in August. Here are several important updates:

Testing

We know many of you have questions about the testing process and requirement.

As a reminder, residential students must show documentation of a negative diagnostic COVID-19 test that was taken within 14 days prior to moving in.

However, there is a new executive order in Connecticut that requires travelers from 31 states to self-quarantine for 14 days or document a negative test that was taken within 72 hours prior to arriving in Connecticut. See our website to learn which states are impacted, but please be aware that as health conditions change across the country, this list will continue to be updated. We know this complicates matters for our families traveling from these states. We are working with other institutions in Connecticut on a process to help with logistics, including determining whether travelers can take their test after arriving in Connecticut. We hope to have that answer soon.

Please look out for other information on testing soon, including suggestions for families on how to obtain a test and document the result.

Residential Life

Early Drop Off

As communicated, we are offering an early drop-off period for residential students who can travel to campus. Please note: the dates have changed slightly and are Saturday, Aug. 15 to Wednesday, Aug. 19.

This will be a same-day, in-and-out process to drop off belongings in rooms and return home without an overnight stay. Advance sign-up will be required for time slots to allow us to maintain social distancing requirements and minimize traffic. Sign-ups will begin once final room assignments are communicated, which will be happening by the end of next week.

Here is how it will work:

  • Sign up for one time slot between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
  • Roommates, suitemates, and apartment-mates must sign up for different slots and cannot be in the living space at the same time.
  • Participate in a “drive-through” process to sign your Housing Agreement and pick up your keys.
  • You will have up to four hours to unpack and set up your living space.
  • You may bring up to three people from your household to help.
  • When you’re done, lock your unit door and return your keys before leaving campus.
  • Students who participate in Early Drop Off may return to campus, pick up their key, and stay overnight beginning on Monday, August 24.
Masks must be worn at all times and social distancing will be strictly enforced.  You do not need to produce a COVID-19 test for early drop off.

Move In

Please note we have slightly changed our move-in schedule. Returning students will move in on Saturday, Aug. 22, and Tuesday, Aug. 25. First-year and transfer students will move in on Sunday, Aug. 23, and Monday, Aug. 24.

Students who are participating in Early Drop Off may return to campus, pick up their key, and stay overnight beginning Monday, Aug. 24.

Sign-ups will begin once final room assignments are communicated, which will be happening in the next week:

  • Sign up for one time slot between 8:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
  • Roommates, suitemates/apartment-mates must sign up for different slots and cannot be in the living space at the same time
  • Participate in a “drive-through” process to sign your Housing Agreement and pick up your keys.
  • You will have up to two hours to move into your room.
  • You may have one person from your current household inside your building/room with you at any given time.
Masks must be worn at all times and social distancing will be strictly enforced. You must produce your negative COVID-19 result before or while picking up your key.

Let’s Keep Hawks Healthy Pledge

We have communicated some of the guidelines and expectations we must all follow to protect our health and our community, and there will be more to come. Some of these rules may seem inconvenient and different from how you originally envisioned your college experience. But for us to remain open this fall, we must all commit to doing our part.  We are asking you to start by taking the Healthy Hawks Pledge. You can find the pledge on our website. Please take the time to read it and familiarize yourself with it. As we get closer to our reopening, we will share ways that you can sign this pledge.

We truly appreciate your patience as we work through our final plans to reopen safely next month. To keep you informed, we have launched our new Healthy Hawks website, hartford.edu/healthy-hawks. This site provides comprehensive information about our fall reopening plans and other aspects of our response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to the emails we will be sending you, we will be frequently updating the site with details on testing and health screenings, campus services, residential life, and other topics. As always, if you have any questions, please email COVID19@hartford.edu

Thank you.

Jessica Nicklin
Associate Vice President for Student Success

July 20: Returning to Work

Dear Faculty and Staff,

As the University makes final preparations to welcome our students back to campus in August, we have been diligently planning for your return as well. We are fortunate that health conditions have vastly improved in Connecticut since the spring. Although the risk of contracting COVID-19 remains, the state has among the lowest infection rates in the country.

This positive news, coupled with strict health and safety protocols, means we will be ready to reopen all offices and welcome employees back to campus on Monday, Aug. 10. We have created a Return to Work Guide to walk through the process and to provide the detailed information you need to safely transition back to on-campus work.

Our plan follows current state requirements and guidance from health experts, as well as best practices based on scientific knowledge of COVID-19. We must all do our part to protect ourselves and our community, and to create an environment where our students can feel safe, supported, and ready to learn. With that principle in mind, we must all follow these key guidelines:

  • Monitor our symptoms
  • Participate in contact tracing
  • Wear a face covering
  • Practice social distancing
  • Practice proper hygiene


The Return to Work Guide provides more information about our robust health and safety protocols, changes to some workspaces, and a phased staffing approach. You can find the guide at hartford.edu/returntowork. In the coming days, we will provide more specifics about a mandatory return-to-work training and how to use the LiveSafe app for daily health screenings. In the meantime, if you have any questions, please contact Human Resources Development at hrd@hartford.edu.

Thank you for all that you do to help our students and each other.

Jen Conley
HRD

July 15: Information for Faculty

Dear Faculty,

We want to update you on a variety of topics that we have been working on recently that will help you prepare for planning. 

Definitions

The terms “online,” “hybrid,” and “remote” are often used interchangeably, which can create some serious confusion.  As we go forward, we will be defining them as follows, and ask that you do the same.

  • Online: These classes are fully online and do not meet at a specific time (asynchronous).
  • Remote: These classes are fully online but meet at a specific time (synchronous).
  • Hybrid: These classes are a mix of in-person and online, depending upon the needs of the class. Some meetings will be in person, while others will be online, as determined by the faculty member. For example, if you teach a Tuesday, Thursday course, you may divide your students into two groups (A/B), one that meets in person on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays, and the other is the reverse.
Self-Service Updated

We have spent the last week updating over 2,300 courses in Banner Self-Service to reflect the changes we were required to make to comply with CDC social distancing guidelines of 6-feet.  When looking at course “Location” in Self-Service, you will see “On Line” for an online asynchronous course, “remote session” for a remote synchronous course, and hybrid courses have the meeting days and times listed twice with both the room number and “Hybrid Session” listed as location.   If you log in to the Self-Service system and use the course search function you will be able to see which format your courses are being offered in.  Please review and if there are changes that need to be made, work with your Chairs to correct them.   One item that does not show in Self-Service is the capacity of the room you are teaching in.  This information may be helpful if you are teaching in the hybrid model as you decide how to break your class into A/B groups.  Your current course enrollments may change, so take that into consideration as you plan group sizes for the hybrid A/B approach. 

The Chairs of each department now have a report that lists which course/s you are teaching, classroom capacity for each course you are teaching as well as whether the course is in a General Purpose Classroom (GPC) or College Controlled Room (CCR).   All GPCs will be equipped with a webcam, computer/podium with WebEx/Zoom and Blackboard Collaborate access.  All rooms for all hybrid courses will have a webcam.  If you are teaching in a CCR room please work with your technical lead to identify which additional technologies will be in your room.

Classrooms

During the past month with the help from many volunteers we have gone through 61 general purpose classrooms and over 150 college-controlled spaces and have set up each room to provide required six-foot social distancing.  We have also tested the Logitech web cams in these spaces and were pleased with the results.  Faculty members will be able to use the webcams to capture what they are writing on the whiteboards or turn them to face the students in discussion. The webcam microphones do a good job of picking up the sound from the instructors and students.  We will be creating and sharing point of view videos for using this technology, which will be most important for those using the hybrid teaching approach  Or if you would like come to visit your classroom to try out the technology yourself, please send an email to our helpdesk at helpdesk@hartford.edu to schedule a visit. You will also need to complete the building access form here: Building Access Form.

Sanitizer stations are being added next week outside our classroom spaces. In compliance the State of Connecticut regulations, in spaces where 6-foot distancing is not possible (mainly labs) we have ordered face shields that will also be worn with masks. 

Student Preparedness

The Center for Student Success (CSS) is currently working on providing resources for students to prepare for the modified educational experience in Fall 2020. We plan for these resources to be available by early August, and hopefully on the CSS webpage (or a Blackboard page).  The format will be short blurbs/bullet points, followed by very short 2-minute videos. We will make sure the link is available for faculty to reference in syllabi and on Blackboard Pages. Topics covered: 

General Preparedness 

  • Different types of educational experiences and examples (hybrid, remote, face to face)
  • Organizing and planning your semester
  • Time management
  • Asking for help
  • Ethics and expectations (recording, netiquette, academic honesty etc., reference to healthy hawks pledge)

Technology

  • Blackboard
  • Blackboard Collaborate
  • Compass
  • WebEx
  • Zoom
Faculty Training Opportunities:

As mentioned previously, a group of faculty was selected by the collegiate deans as faculty trainers for hybrid instruction. They are currently participating in eight sessions to help them prepare for training college faculty at the August 12-13 workshop and beyond.  For those who want to get a head start on fall planning, we will be sharing recordings of these webinars with you, too.  A modified recording of the first session of the Hybrid Train the Trainer Series is now available for viewing.  To access this and future session recordings as they become available, please visit the CTEI SharePoint site. Resources associated with each session are available in the Documents folder.  Click Documents on the left, then select the “Hybrid Train Trainer” folder.  Should “Sign In” be requested, use your UH email credentials.

The first of eight sessions addressed a few possible hybrid A/B course delivery models.  The pdf attachment provides a review of these models.  These models are meant as a starting place.  We are not advocating for one over another and fully expect faculty will decide what model best suits their course content, student population, and instructional preferences.  One similarity noted across all hybrid models is that some course content is posted online for students to access asynchronously.  This is particularly important for students in your courses who be fully remote for the Fall.  A proactive step to supporting hybrid instruction might be to begin early moving some materials online (to Blackboard or OneDrive or other online repositories).  Your college Hybrid Trainers (list included below) will be available to point you to resources that can help you as you decide what instructional modifications make sense for your content. 

As a reminder, If you have technology questions, like “How do I record my lecture,” please see FCLD resources on Ensemble Anthem or WebEx/Bb Collaborate recording.

Hybrid college trainer

A&S

Barney

CETA

ENHP

Hartt

HAS

Hillyer

UIS

July 10: New Information About Fall Opening

Dear Students,

We are looking forward to welcoming you back to the University of Hartford just over six weeks from now. The last two months have been a whirlwind of activity as our faculty and staff continue to implement comprehensive plans for a safe reopening. It has been an inspiring period of hard work, reflection, partnership, and purposeful action. Life at UHart will look different in the fall—it has to—but we are committed to working together to act in the best interest of the safety and well-being of our entire campus community, while delivering an excellent student-centered educational experience.

Over the next several weeks, we will share detailed information about schedules, move-in, housing assignments, health and safety guidelines, and more. In the meantime, I am pleased to provide several high-level updates on our fall opening:

Health and Safety

We are fortunate that health conditions have steadily improved in Connecticut after months of intensive control efforts implemented by state leaders. The state currently has among the lowest infection rates in the country. We anticipate that with the very clear and careful health guidelines and protocols we will implement, the preemptive precautions, the partnership of our on-campus health professionals at Hartford Healthcare, and the cooperation of our students and all members of our community, we will be able to secure a safe learning experience on campus this fall.

Some of the protocols and precautions include:

Daily Health Screenings: All students will be required to participate in daily health screenings via our LiveSafe app.

Face coverings: All students, employees, and visitors are required to wear face coverings when in public. This means when you are not in your personal living space, including in the classroom, you must wear a face covering. The University will provide every student returning to campus with one washable cloth UHart mask, but please plan to bring additional personal face coverings. Every effort will be made to supply face coverings as needed in various campus settings.

Social Distancing: Academic facilities, dining halls, libraries, performance spaces, and other campus areas are being reconfigured to allow for social distancing of at least six feet.

Cleaning and Disinfecting: Our facilities team will continue to perform regular intense cleaning of all public spaces. They will consistently disinfect classrooms, common areas, workspaces, and dining areas to help minimize transmission. Additional hand sanitizing stations are being installed across campus and ventilation systems are being updated with appropriate filters.

Testing: In accordance with recommendations from state and public health officials, all residential students will be required to provide documentation of a negative COVID-19 test within 14 days of arriving on campus. In addition to the increasing availability of testing in communities across the country, the University is working with peer institutions and our health-care partners to offer additional testing opportunities. In the coming weeks, we will share additional details, including how to document a negative test result with the University prior to travel.

Academic Calendar and Class Schedules

As a reminder, we made changes to our fall 2020 academic calendar in the spring. Additionally, your class schedule will be emailed to your UHart email address over the next several weeks. On your schedule, you will see several types of classes listed. We have created a blended approach to academics for the fall and are offering classes in a variety of formats:

In Person: Traditional in-person classes will meet at a specific time and place that is reflected on your schedule.

Hybrid: These classes are a mix of in person and online, depending upon the needs of the class. Some meetings will be in person, while others will be online, as determined by the faculty member. For example, if you have a Tuesday, Thursday course, the instructor may tell you that it meets in person on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays.

Remote: These classes are fully online but meet at a specific time (synchronous).

Online: These classes are fully online and do not meet at a specific time (asynchronous).

It is possible that some of your courses will not be in the format you prefer. We are balancing our plan to offer in-person classes and experiences with space constraints required by social distancing in the classroom, and working with our faculty who have high-risk considerations or disability accommodations, to support your academic goals. Depending on your area of study, there may still be updates in development. Your school, college, or academic program will communicate specific plans in the near future. For example, The Hartt School is developing fall performance programming that will also allow students to be more focused on required courses, while preparing for even more robust intensive performance experiences during the spring semester. Other academic departments are brainstorming and solidifying creative solutions to labs and experiential learning opportunities.

We know that many of you are looking forward to in-person classes but that there are others who, for various reasons, are unable to or do not want to return to face-to-face learning. We will do everything we can to accommodate a remote learning environment for the fall semester should you choose to remain off campus. If you would like to learn more about the opportunities to study remotely this fall, please contact the Center for Student Success at css@hartford.edu. In the coming weeks, more educational resources will be available for you to be prepared for academic success this fall.

Residential Life

Our enhanced safety measures and commitment to strictly following social distancing and quarantine guidelines have led to capacity changes in our residential communities. Unfortunately, this means some housing assignments may have to change. We know these changes are not ideal, but they are necessary, and we all have a role to play in maintaining the strictest health and safety standards to keep each other safe. Housing assignments will be finalized by the end of July. Students will receive an email with their fall housing assignments, and further information about residential life will be forthcoming. Additionally, because of the changes to our fall calendar after Thanksgiving break, billing statements will reflect a reduction in housing and dining costs for residential students. You can see a cost breakdown on our website. We know your residential life experience is extremely important to you and we sincerely thank you for your patience and flexibility.

I hope this information is helpful as you prepare to return to UHart this fall. I know you still have questions and I encourage you to check your email regularly for updates with additional information on these topics and others between now and our reopening. You can continue to find our latest updates at hartford.edu/fall-opening. If you have immediate questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to email COVID19@hartford.edu.

I am looking forward to seeing you on campus soon. Stay well!

Gregory Woodward
President

July 8: A Message For Faculty About Remote Students

Dear Faculty Colleagues,

By now you have received the information about faculty development opportunities available to you as you prepare for the fall. I want to follow up with one very important addition – the need for students to be able to remote in to any of our classes. We have promised all students that they will have this option, except in hands-on situations like a dance or sculpture studio.

As I have emphasized before, we don’t know what the fall will bring. Some students will choose not to come to campus at all, but I anticipate that many others will find themselves unable to come to class for periods of time. Students who test positive for COVID are going to be quarantined, either on campus or at home. It appears from what we know about the virus that many of those students will be asymptomatic and perfectly able to participate in class from a distance. While there will certainly be some classes where students can only participate in person, for the majority of classes, we need to be creative and flexible in finding ways to accommodate. This will be true if you are using the hybrid A/B model or even if you are 100% face to face.

If you have a student in this situation, there are three things you need to think about for remote students:

Access to course materials: For those of you using Blackboard, this is easy. If you are choosing not to use Blackboard, please create some other repository and let the student(s) know how to access it.

Access to content delivered during class meetings: This can be done synchronously, by using Webex, Collaborate, Zoom, or some other video conferencing platform and allowing students to watch or participate in presentations in real time. It can also be done asynchronously by making a recording of the class session or by posting videos. If you are using a video conferencing platform, it can easily be set to record the class session. Recording is probably a good idea in any case, so that students can review materials.

Participation during class meetings: If your class meeting time is discussion-based, the students who are not there need to be able to participate in the discussion. Here again, a video conferencing platform, with some simple accommodations, will do the trick. You will need a headset so you can move around the room, and we will be happy to provide one for you.

If you are teaching in the hybrid A/B model, please know that the college-based trainers will be trained on these options and can help you. If you are teaching face to face or you need additional resources on video conferencing technologies, you can view FCLD resources on video conferencing tools like WebEx, on the FCLD web site.

Thank you to FCLD and CTEI for their help in preparing this document. And thank you for working to make sure that all our students feel as included and connected as possible this fall.

Fred Sweitzer

July 6: Faculty Development for Fall Teaching Approaches

For the fall semester, faculty members will find themselves teaching in new formats, many for the first time. Our faculty have shown great resilience and commitment to their students and to one another in formal and informal ways, and that spirit of collaboration and engagement will surely continue this fall. As part of that effort, a variety of faculty development opportunities have been created to support instructors in their fall teaching.  These opportunities are aimed at the methods that we know will be used; as other needs arise; we will do our best to meet them.

These opportunities fall into five categories:

  • Hybrid Learning
  • The Hybrid A/B Model
  • Teaching Fully On-Line
  • Enhancing Selected Skills
  • Special August Workshops

Hybrid Learning

Hybrid instruction can be defined as a combination of face to face class meetings and online/virtual instruction. Our spring curriculum festival focused on hybrid learning.  Recordings of those sessions, as well as other resources, can be found on the CTEI web site.

Hybrid A/B Models offer a way to hold face to face class meetings while following CDC distancing guidelines.  The need to physically distance by six feet requires that far fewer students be in classrooms at any given time.  With reduced classroom capacity, the typical Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday class meetings must be reimagined.  In a nutshell, 1/2 the students will be in class at any given time while the other half is online.  For example, if you are teaching a course with 26 students that meets twice a week, you will, in the hybrid A/B format, split that group of 26 students into two groups, Group A (13 students) and Group B (13 Students).  On Monday, you teach Group A face to face while Group B is working from home/dorm, online.  On Wednesday, the groups rotate.  Group B is now face to face with you, and Group A is working online from home/dorm.  The group not meeting face to face during one class period could remote into the classroom or work on assignments without remoting in.  Instructors will determine how best to structure the online expectations.  We recognize this is a big departure from our traditional models of instruction and course delivery.  And, although a variety of instructional options within this hybrid A/B approach exist, many of us need more support both learning about and applying these options to our own courses. 

Training and Support for Hybrid A/B Course Delivery
We are going to use a cadre of faculty from each college to do some deep learning about the A/B model and other forms of hybrid pedagogy.  We will provide them with core training and also help them think through the specific needs and implications for the programs in their colleges. 

These college trainers will then serve as additional support for their college colleagues as they work on modifying courses to hybrid models. Specific details about the activities in your college will be available soon and we encourage you to take advantage of them to get a head start on course planning. The college trainers will also be available as informal mentors to college colleagues who may need either guidance or a simple sounding board for ideas. Finally, they will be conducting targeted workshops on August 12 as part of the Special August Workshops

You may also be interested in the topics of the training sessions being offered for these college-based trainers.  While the initial sessions are open only to them, all training sessions will be recorded and available to all UH instructors as completed in July. Information on how to access those sessions will be forthcoming.

  • How to efficiently design for hybrid course delivery that works for your discipline (many options exist)
  • How to check for curricular alignment to reduce redundancy and narrow instructional focus (quality vs quantity)
  • How to engage students in course content within and outside of the classroom
  • Technology options to support information sharing with students
  • Ideas for reducing instructor's course design workload for courses with multiple sections

The training series will assist all college trainers as they consider and plan for the unique aspects of teaching within their college disciplines.  One size does not fit all and the sessions will allow each participant to tailor their learning around their disciplinary needs. 

Teaching Fully On-Line

Our fully on-line offerings will fall into two categories based on student population: graduate and adult students, and traditional age undergraduates. For the first of these populations, the most effective approach is usually asynchronous. An online asynchronous course does not include any real-time interaction. The course materials and assessments are provided to the students who can access them within a flexible time frame. For our undergraduate who are taking a mixture of on-line and face to face classes, a synchronous approach is strongly recommended. An online synchronous course will include real-time interaction on a set schedule. Online Teaching 101, will help you choose between these approaches and offer skills that are common to both.

Online Teaching 101

Is required training for anyone teaching on-line in the fall*.  It is a series of eight classes that will help faculty to prepare to teach remotely this fall. The series will cover a range of important topics including teaching pedagogy, Blackboard course creation and synchronous teaching tools. Faculty members will have the opportunity to plan and create their courses for the fall semester with guidance and instruction from course design experts.  Online Teaching 101 will be offered twice. The first series will begin on July 20 and run through July 30, Monday – Thursday evenings 6:30pm-7:30pm. The second series will begin on August 3 and run through August 14, Monday-Friday mornings 11:00am-12:00pm (with no class on August 12 & 13). Interested faculty members must contact FCLD@hartford.edu to enroll. Space is limited in each session, so plan to register soon.  Faculty members who are new to online teaching and complete this series will receive a $750 stipend. Note: All sessions will be recorded and posted on the FCLD website, but in order to receive the stipend you must attend the actual sessions.

Online Teaching 101 Schedule with Topic Headings: (all one-hour sessions begin at 6:30PM)

  • July 20-Session 1: Building Syllabus with Learning Objectives
  • July 21-Session 2: Backwards Design with Course Planner Template
  • July 22-Session 3: Best Practice Engagement with Bb Tools
  • July 23-Session 4: Best Practices Engagement with Collaborate
  • July 27-Session 5: Building Course Content in Blackboard
  • July 28-Session 6: Creating Assignments using SafeAssign in Blackboard, and Journals
  • July 29-Session 7: Creating Assessments-Bb Test, Respondus and On-Campus options
  • July 30-Session 8: Wrap up with review of Model Course

This series will repeat again beginning on August 3rd according to the following schedule: (all one-hour sessions begin at 11:00 AM)

  • August 3-Session 1: Building Syllabus with Learning Objectives
  • August 4-Session 2: Backwards Design with Course Planner Template
  • August 5-Session 3: Best Practice Engagement with Bb Tools
  • August 6-Session 4: Best Practices Engagement with Collaborate
  • August 7-Session 5: Building Course Content in Blackboard
  • August 10-Session 6: Creating Assignments using SafeAssign in Blackboard, and Journals
  • August 11-Session 7: Creating Assessments-Bb Test, Respondus and On-Campus options
  • August 14-Session 8: Wrap up with review of Model Course

Enhancing Selected Skills

Additional workshops, centered on specific technologies or features available for teaching, including Blackboard features, Office365 and Ensemble, are also available. 

FCLD’s August Jumpstart Seminars
The Faculty Center for Learning Development (FCLD) offers ongoing seminars and instruction on a variety of instructional technology, including Blackboard, the University's learning management system (LMS).   FCLD will be offering the following seminars during August.  All webinars will be held online in Blackboard Collaborate.  To join, click the guest link for each session and enter your name at the time of the session.  Faculty do not need to register for these sessions, but if you have questions, you can contact FCLD at fcld@hartford.edu.

Getting Started with Blackboard/Blackboard Drop-in
Tuesdays, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Click to Join Session

Every Tuesday, we offer an orientation and drop-in clinic for Blackboard, the application used to put courses online. If you’re new to Blackboard, you’ll learn strategies for organizing your Blackboard course, review the many tools and features available in Blackboard, and start adding course content items like your syllabus and web links to your course. Be sure to bring a digital version of your syllabus and/or other course materials; this is designed as a hands-on seminar. If you’re using Blackboard already, feel free to drop by with a question or for troubleshooting. 

Grade Center: Do It Now!
Monday, August 17, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Click to Join Session

Monday, August 24, 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Click to Join Session

Come and learn how setting up your Blackboard Grade Center early in the semester has numerous advantages.   Doing so earlier means you can:

  • Have course grades calculated automatically throughout the course.•Help students keep track of their own progress throughout the course.
  • Have information ready at your fingertips when it's time to submit mid-semester or final grades.
  • Weight grades and drop lowest scores quickly and easily.


Bb Annotate! Blackboard’s New Inline Grading Tool
Wednesday, August 19, 10:00 a.m. Click to Join Session

Tired of downloading papers from Blackboard just so you can grade them?  Blackboard’s new Inline Grading Tool is designed to allow instructors to grade and markup student assignments without the cumbersome process of downloading and using Microsoft Word’s markup tools or something equivalent.  This seminar is a must for online instructors, but very helpful for anyone who uses Blackboard’s assignment tool.

Getting Started with Ensemble and Creating ‘Lecturettes’ with Anthem


Tuesday, August 18, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Click to Join Session
Tuesday, August 25, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Click to Join Session

Ensemble works like an in-house YouTube, allowing faculty to quickly and easily upload videos, then link to them from Blackboard and other websites. Faculty who are flipping the classroom, teaching online, using video clips in instruction, or working with student video projects should plan to attend this special information session about Ensemble.  Anthem (Ensemble Personal Capture) is a simple, convenient tool that can capture your voice, the action on your computer screen, and web cam video to create lecturettes. You can use it to record audio podcasts, video lectures, or narrated presentations and demonstrations.  This session will guide you through the process of recording a narrated screen capture, editing it, and publishing it to Blackboard. If you do not already have an Ensemble account, please sign up for one here before this webinar.

PowerPoint Bootcamp & Design a Banner for Blackboard 

Thursday, August 20, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Click to Join Session

Learn how to spice up your PowerPoints in this seminar, creating visually stimulating PowerPoint slides that appeal to the reader and incorporate media in its various forms. Learn how to embed images, manipulate them, and also add graphics, transitions, animations and other tools to create interactivity within your presentations. We will also design a banner for your Blackboard Course. 

Office365 and OneDrive Cloud Storage Information Session 

Friday, August 21, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Click to Join Session

All instructors, staff and students now have Office365 free online, which comes with a suite of new tools and some old favorites. Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and our Outlook Webmail are old tools we are familiar with, but did you know we now also have Skype for Business, OneNote, and Class Notebook, among others? Also, did you know you can download the entire suite as Office 2016 on up to 5 of your own personal devices?  We will also discuss the University’s own One Drive storage solution, which provides faculty and staff with 1 TB free storage space. Instructors have the ability to easily and quickly upload files to Blackboard courses right from their cloud storage, such as OneDrive, Google Drive, Dropbox or Box. Students are also able to upload documents from cloud storage when they submit Blackboard assignments.

August Workshops 

As additional support for those using the A/B model and other approaches to hybrid learning, we are offering an online webinar series August 12 and 13. Many topics in the series will also be relevant for those teaching fully online and in other formats. College Trainers will share sessions relevant to specific college needs and disciplines.  Faculty members attending these sessions will receive a $250 stipend.

Dr. Jim Lang’s Keynote*: “Small Teaching in the COVID Era”

“Research from the learning sciences and from a variety of educational settings suggests that a small number of key principles can improve learning in almost any type of college or university course, including the online and hybrid classrooms in which we will be teaching during the 2020-2021 academic year.  This keynote will introduce some of those principles, offer practical suggestions for how they might foster positive change in higher education teaching and learning, and guide faculty participants to consider how these principles might manifest themselves in their current and upcoming courses.”

More information, including registration details will be shared soon.


*Jim Lang is the author of Small Teaching and co-author of Small Teaching On-Line.

June Updates

June 19: Return to Work Update

Dear Faculty and Staff,

As the state of Connecticut continues to reopen in phases, the University also continues to assess the feasibility of returning to campus. We are giving a great deal of thought to the fall and how to open the campus as safely as possible. In this, we remain committed to the safety of our workforce.

Campus will continue to be closed to all employees who are not required to be there for work. If you need to return to campus for another reason, you must submit the Employee Building Access form to Public Safety in order to enter any campus buildings. Please be considerate in making your requests. These visits will require staff to assist with access and cleaning, taking away from already reduced resources in our Public Safety and Facilities operations.

Throughout July and into the beginning of August, to the extent possible, employees who can effectively perform their job responsibilities remotely should continue to do so. During this time, Facilities and other reopening committees will review all departments for necessary protective barriers and social distancing, and ensure that the University is in compliance with all of the state of Connecticut’s reopening requirements. Reopening of offices will require a thorough assessment of challenges, as well as measures that can reasonably be put into place to provide protection to our workforce.

Additionally, some of our employees may be particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 due to their age, underlying health conditions, or other factors. Please see the CDC’s list of high-risk groups. If you need to request an accommodation for the fall, please review the below information and engage with the Office of Human Resources Development (HRD) to discuss your specific situation, documentation requirements, and options.

DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS

The University will continue to follow its established process for disability accommodations, including engaging in the interactive process with faculty and staff with disabilities to determine whether they require reasonable accommodations to perform the essential functions of their job amidst the pandemic. If faculty or staff have a medical condition that could reasonably affect their ability to safely perform their duties on campus, they must request a reasonable accommodation through HRD and go through the interactive process. Based on the information obtained through that process, a determination will be made as to whether the employee qualifies for a reasonable accommodation.

HIGH-RISK CONSIDERATIONS

For employees who may not have a disability, but are otherwise considered “high risk” for serious illness due to COVID-19, the University has established the process below for those faculty and staff to explore the possibility of alternative work arrangements with their supervisors.

  • Employees who are, or will be 65 or older as of December 31, 2020, and wish to continue to work from home should contact HRD before July 17, 2020.
  • Employees who believe their own underlying health condition increases the risk for serious complications related to COVID-19 should contact HRD to discuss the situation no later than July 31, 2020. HRD will notify the appropriate supervisor if the request is granted.
  • Employees who cohabitate with someone who is or will be age 65 or older as of December 31, 2020, or who cohabitate with someone with an underlying health condition that increases the risk for serious complications related to COVID-19 shall contact HRD to discuss the situation by July 31, 2020. HRD will notify the appropriate supervisor of the staff member’s decision.
  • UHart will grant temporary unpaid administrative leave to any staff member who requests such a leave. Requests should be made to HRD no later than June 30, 2020. HRD shall notify the appropriate supervisor, and address such requests on a semester-by-semester basis.


It is possible that your circumstances could change during the pandemic. If that happens, please let your supervisor know (if you feel comfortable doing so) and contact HRD. If different arrangements need to be made, HRD will work with each employee to discuss options.

As a reminder, supervisors/department heads/administrators must refer all requests for ADA accommodations, as well as requests for alternative work arrangements based on COVID-19 risk factors, to HRD. 

The concerns and well-being of faculty and staff, the education of our students, and the overall well-being of the institution are all important, and integrating those concerns is not always easy.

Thank you for your patience—and for all you do, have done, and will do for this university.
 
Office of Human Resources Development
hrd@hartford.edu

June 16: A Message for Faculty

Dear Faculty Colleagues,

I know that no one likes a long email (except maybe me) but I did promise you a series of updates on the fall semester and here is the second one. This one focuses on the class schedule, the teaching formats we will need to be prepared for, and the supports we are putting in place.

Before I begin I want to acknowledge that many of you are having to change the structure and pedagogy of your courses yet again. You did great work this spring; while things were far from perfect it was not for lack of commitment and effort on your part. And some of you are teaching on-line this summer. The fall represents another set of challenges. I will repeat, briefly, something I said in my earlier email to full time faculty.

We are not able to have the same number of students in our classrooms as we have in the past, and a number of people (including faculty) are working on how to manage that situation. There is no question that we will need to put some of our classes on-line. And we are gathering information from colleges and departments about which courses are best suited to being offered on-line. However, when we can, we want to have a face to face experience for the students. And, no matter what we plan, we will have students who are not willing or able to come to campus and still want to take courses. With the exception of some graduate students, students in this situation will not be able to find enough fully on-line courses.

We are trying to figure out how to deal with this new reality without completely disrupting the class schedule. We are getting precise information on classroom and lab capacity, as well as some emerging special rules for labs, and trying to identify additional spaces on campus we might use for teaching purposes. One approach that some other schools are using and that would help us preserve the schedule in many cases is an “A/B” approach, where class meets twice a week and half the students are in class on each day, with the other half either participating or working remotely. Our new class schedule has created more twice a week slots, but we know that not every class can meet this way. In particular, we are still sorting out how to manage once a week classes, particularly for graduate and adult students who may not be able to come to campus on any day other than the one they signed up for. The other approach we are considering is using Saturdays on a limited basis. We may need to move some STEM labs to Saturday, for example. Also, since we are sending students home at Thanksgiving, some courses (like a Ceramics Studio) will be over at that point, as there is no remote instruction possible. But by attending a session on a Saturday students can get in that fourteenth week. We continue to work closely with colleges and departments to understand whether the A/B approach will work in all courses.

We will be offering faculty and curriculum development support this summer to help people get ready for the format they are going to use. The A/B model is a particular form of Hybrid learning and we know faculty will need assistance planning and adapting. For those teaching in a hybrid mode we will be offering suggestions for modifying the approach to accommodate students who will not be participating in person. We will also support faculty who are teaching face to face (or hybrid) plan for students who cannot attend class in person. And since there will also be some courses fully on-line, we will be once again offering our Learning to Teach On-Line series at least once over the summer. And as other needs emerge, we will do our best to meet them. More details on the current planned menu of opportunities will be out very soon. 

Finally, as the modalities we will be using, and who will be using them, becomes clear, there will certainly be technology needs and we will meet them. Given that in many cases these modalities could be a one-time thing, we do need to be prudent in our purchases and may not always be able to get the specific piece of hardware or software that every person wants, but we are committed to providing a workable solution to any technological challenges.

We have an Implementation Team working on all these issues. They are further divided in to working groups on classrooms and scheduling; pedagogy, technology, and fully on-line learning. Each college has at least one person as a link to those groups, so that information can flow back and forth easily. The leaders of this effort are me, RJ McGivney, Sebby Sorrentino, Jim Shattuck, Lisa Zawilinski, and Barb Haines. You can feel free to contact any of us with questions or concerns.

I know you also have questions about PPE, cleaning schedules and supplies, traffic control and other health and safety issues. There is a group working on these issues as well, co-chaired by Norm Young and Aaron Isaacs. Nothing has been completely settled yet; if you have questions or suggestions I am happy to convey them or you can reach out directly.
I continue to be incredibly proud of the commitment our faculty make to their students and to effective teaching and learning. This is another set of challenges, but I know we will rise to the occasion.

My Very Best to You,
Fred Sweitzer
Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost

May Updates

May 30: Fall Opening Update

Dear Students,

As we ready to turn the page on another month, my thoughts continue to be with you and your family. I hope this update gives us all something to look forward to.

As we approached the end of the spring semester, I communicated with you about the comprehensive planning teams that are working diligently on our fall 2020 scenario planning. While that work continues, the messages I have received from so many of you over the last several weeks have been strong and very clear. Our students are eager to continue their education at the University of Hartford in the fall—in person and on campus. Faculty and staff are equally determined to safely resume in-person teaching, learning, and residential life for the fall 2020 semester, being ever mindful of the need to protect the health and safety of our community.

The summer months will allow us necessary time to develop robust and specific plans for the creation of a blended approach to learning in multiple formats, thoroughly meeting the needs of our students, faculty, course types, and program curricula. UHart is well-positioned to meet health requirements and to implement best safety practices for our community due to our small class sizes; personalized support; and the variety of classroom, residential, and dining facilities across our 350-acre campus. Hartford HealthCare, one of Connecticut’s largest health-care systems and our on-campus student health provider, continues to assist us in putting in place the staffing, tests, and equipment necessary for our fall opening.

As all of these pieces come together toward welcoming you back to school safely in the fall, we are innovating every part of the UHart experience—from the academic calendar to residential living—to provide options and access for the best and safest possible combination of on-campus and high-quality remote teaching. We will soon provide further details about health screening and specifics on any possible housing changes within our residential facilities.

For now, please note the following important changes to the academic calendar for the fall 2020 semester. Our plans and schedule, of course, are dependent on the ongoing guidance from the state of Connecticut and public health officials.

  • Saturday, Aug. 15–Sunday, Aug. 23: The University will offer an early drop-off period during the week leading up to the start of the semester for residential students who can easily travel to campus. This will be a same-day, in-and-out process to drop off belongings in rooms and return home without an overnight stay. Similar to our ongoing move-out process, advance sign-up will be required for preset time slots. This will allow us to accommodate testing requirements, maintain social distancing recommendations, and minimize traffic.
  • Monday, Aug. 24–Wednesday, Aug. 26: Students begin living in residence halls, with arrivals scheduled on a staggered basis. The early drop-off of belongings by as many students as possible will help to accelerate this process.
  • Wednesday, Aug. 26: Instruction begins for all students. Online instruction may be utilized during the first week to allow for move-in and the administration of state-required COVID testing of all students upon their return. Please note, some academic programs may begin in-classroom instruction prior to Aug. 26, per Connecticut state guidelines for graduate and select student populations. Information will be provided directly to these groups.
  • Monday, Sept. 7: Classes will be held on Labor Day.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 24: On-campus classes conclude at the end of the day. Students depart for Thanksgiving break and will not return to campus until Jan. 17, after winter break. This schedule reduces the risks of virus spread during flu season; allows for a thorough cleaning of all campus facilities; and limits the possibility of students, faculty, and staff returning to campus after potentially being exposed to the virus during travel over the Thanksgiving break. We recognize this change means less time for students in our residential and dining facilities. As a result, we will proactively reduce room and board costs by two weeks. Revised bills for residential students will reflect this reduction.
  • Monday, Nov. 30–Tuesday, Dec. 15: Fall classes, review sessions, office hours, reading days, and final exams will be completed remotely. We recognize that Commencement is Dec. 15, and we will work with all graduating students requiring accommodations.
  • Winterterm and Spring 2021: Winterterm will be fully online this winter, and will begin on Saturday, Dec. 26, and end on Friday, Jan. 15. The spring 2021 semester will begin as planned on Wednesday, Jan. 20, with residence halls reopening on Sunday, Jan. 17.
The University of Hartford has demonstrated the strength of our institution and the resilience of our community during this crisis. We have taken a phased approach to a complex and evolving situation, being thoughtful and informed in our analysis and decision making. Above all, we are working together to act in the best interest of the safety and well-being of our entire campus community, while delivering an excellent and student-centered educational experience. Please know that our dedication to these priorities remains the same as we prepare to welcome you back to the University of Hartford in August.
 
I will share additional details as we move forward together. Updates will also be provided at hartford.edu/fall-opening.

Best Wishes,
Greg Woodward
President

May 21: Move-Out Information

Dear Students,

I’m pleased to announce that we will be offering another move-out period beginning next week. Starting Tuesday, May 26, at 8:30 a.m., and running through June 1 at 6:30 p.m., we will allow residential students to retrieve their belongings from residence halls and, in some cases, academic buildings.

I know there is a lot of information here. Please take the time to read through the entire email to ensure a safe and smooth move-out experience.

It is NOT mandatory that you move out at this time. If you know that you will be not be able to return to campus before fall due to distance and other restrictions, please fill out this form so we can work with you to make alternate arrangements.

As during our previous move-out period, we will strictly follow CDC guidelines and executive orders in Connecticut for social distancing, minimizing crowds, and hygiene protocols. In order to make this process possible, we will have many important rules in place.

Most importantly, if you are experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms, or have been in contact with anyone not feeling well or experiencing symptoms, please do not come to campus. If you are vulnerable to COVID-19 due to age, underlying health conditions, or other risk factors as defined by the CDC, please do not come to campus. We will work with you to make alternate arrangements for your belongings.

All visitors to campus must wear masks.

 Academic Buildings

College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture: Students can retrieve items between 1 and 4 p.m. on May 26, 28, and 29. Please contact cetahelp@hartford.edu to make arrangements.

The Hartt School: Students who need to pick up items from any Hartt School buildings can do so at any time during the move-out period. Please contact Leonard Bretton at harttops@hartford.edu to make arrangements.

Hartford Art School: Belongings can be picked up from the Hartford Art School between noon and 2 p.m. on May 26, 27, and 28, and between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on May 29, 30, 31, and June 1.

Residence Halls

  • You must sign up using your Hartford email account for a selected block of time prior to your arrival on campus. When ready, you can click here to select your residence and sign up for a time slot.
  • You are not permitted to sign up for more than one time slot. Doing so will result in a default to the first time slot chosen.
  • You must sign up in order to be allowed on campus. If you miss the assigned time block, or arrive at any other time outside of what was assigned, you will be placed in a queue and potentially turned away. Please understand this is for everyone’s health and safety.
  • You must arrive, move out, and depart within your designated block of time. This is non-negotiable.
  • Roommates/apartment-mates are not permitted to sign up for the same block of time. Please connect with your roommate(s) to coordinate different move-out times.
  • You are allowed no more than two people to assist you and must maintain proper social distancing from other groups at all times (at least six feet).

Park River and Hawk Hall

If you lived in Park River or Hawk Hall, you were previously notified that your items had been packed and moved from these locations to allow us to provide housing for first responders. Thank you again for your understanding and flexibility during that process.

You may collect your belongings from the Handel Performing Arts Center, which is located at 35 Westbourne Parkway in Hartford. Please park in the lot and go to the front entrance for additional instructions. Items are in boxes, which are organized first by room, followed by side of the room. Items from shared areas such as kitchens, bathrooms, and living rooms are grouped together, so please plan ahead with your roommate to determine who will retrieve which boxes.

*Please note: because all of the items are in boxes, it may be necessary to unpack them in order to fit everything in your vehicle. You may also want to consider bringing a larger vehicle or two cars if possible.

We will have dollies and carts to assist you. These items will be wiped down between each use. Drop boxes will be here as well to donate non-perishable food items to Foodshare and there will also be a library return box here.

Once all items are packed in your vehicle, you will check out with a representative from Residential Life.

All Other Residence Halls

  • You must enter campus through the main entrance on Bloomfield Avenue and check in with Public Safety for further instruction. You will be asked to present a valid ID and the registration receipt with your time slot indicated (this will be used for verification purposes) in order to gain entry to campus. A one-way traffic pattern will be implemented—you will exit campus on Mark Twain Drive.
  • In order to be officially checked out, you must complete the packet taped to your door. Room keys must be placed in this packet and returned to the designated check-out area located on Mark Twain Drive. All students will receive confirmation from a Res Life staff member once the process is complete.
  • Once checked out, you will not be permitted to remain on or return to campus.

Again, it is crucial that students and guests stay within their selected time slot and follow the above rules for the safety of all.  

What to Expect During Move-Out

As we have previously shared, in compliance with executive orders in Connecticut, campus is now closed. This means you will not have access to regular campus and support services, including the library, financial aid offices, mailroom, GSU, and so on. Food services will not be available.           

  • Even though you have been assigned a time to move out, please be prepared to wait temporarily in a parking lot holding zone as we carefully control the number of people entering campus. Public Safety will serve as a valuable resource as we guide traffic and visitors.
  • Regretfully, due to the current restrictions and safety precautions, staff will not be available to assist you in physically moving out of your space. Please plan accordingly.
  • All common areas and high-touch zones will be routinely sanitized by our custodial staff during the move-out periods.
  • Please bring your own packing supplies and materials. Dumpsters will also be placed throughout campus so you can dispose of larger items. Yellow moving bins will not be provided to students, so please bring resources to assist you if you are able, such as personal dollies or carts.
  • Yellow drop boxes will be placed at checkout (Mark Twain Drive) to donate non-perishable food items to Foodshare, and there will also be library return boxes.

Unable to Return

Again, it is not mandatory that you move out at this time. If you are unable to return, please fill out this form so we can work with you to make alternate arrangements.

Mailing in Your Key

If you have already moved out but still have your key, please send it back to avoid being billed for it and a lock change. Please mail it, along with your room number, in a padded envelope to Max Koskoff, Office of Residential Life, University of Hartford, 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford, CT 06117. We recommend sending your key via certified mail to ensure proper delivery.

Subject to Change

Please understand that this situation continues to evolve each day, and we must adhere to current state, federal, and CDC mandates. These schedules and future opportunities are subject to change.

We realize this is a difficult situation and that you are moving out under less than ideal circumstances. We will do everything we can to provide you with a safe and organized process to gather your belongings. Our primary concern remains the health and safety of our students, families, and community.

Again, please click here to select your residence and sign up for a time slot when you are ready. If you have any additional questions about moving out, please contact Residential Life at reslife@hartford.edu. .Please continue to visit the University of Hartford website for information and resources related to COVID-19. 


Thank you,
Aaron Isaacs
Dean of Students


May 18: Employee Schedules

Dear Faculty and Staff,

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact Connecticut, we remain committed to the safety of our workforce. For this reason, we have made the decision to keep most campus operations operating remotely until at least July 1, 2020. Asking most of our employees to work from home enables us to provide appropriate social distancing measures for our colleagues who must remain on campus to support our students or continue vital business operations.   

Accessing Campus

Campus will continue to be closed to all employees who are not required to be there for work. If you need to return to campus for another reason, you must submit the Employee Building Access form to Public Safety in order to enter any campus buildings. Please be considerate in making your requests. These visits will require staff to assist with access and cleaning, taking away from already reduced resources in our Public Safety and Facilities operations.

Please Note: Public Safety will need 24 hours to review your submission prior to providing a response.

Monitoring Symptoms

As a reminder, anyone who has been authorized to enter campus must undergo a health screening. When arriving, please proceed directly to the Operations Building warehouse, located on the east side of the Public Safety building (alongside Mark Twain Drive).

The screening process includes general health questions and checking for the presence of fever. All individuals will have their temperature taken and will be asked about the following symptoms.

  • Fever (100° or higher)
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fatigue and muscle aches
  • Feeling generally unwell
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

If you answer “no” to every question about symptoms and you don’t have a fever, you will be authorized to remain on campus.

Working on Campus

Our goal is to provide a healthy work environment for everyone and, in turn, to minimize the risk of illness whenever possible. To achieve this, we would like to offer the following reminders:

  • Stay home if you are sick or have any symptoms related to COVID-19
  • You are encouraged to wear cloth face coverings in the workplace, if appropriate
  • Keep your workstation clean
  • Maintain six feet of space between you and your co-workers whenever possible
  • Contact your personal physician if you are experiencing symptoms

Vulnerable Employees

Some of our employees may be particularly vulnerable to catching COVID-19 due to their age, underlying health conditions, or other factors. Please see the CDC’s list of high-risk groups. Contact HRD if you fall into one of these categories and have been asked to work—or are still working—on campus for any reason, or if you wish to request an accommodation for any other health-related issue.

As you are aware, this situation continues to evolve and we continue to follow the guidance of state officials and public health experts. Please continue to visit hartford.edu/health-coronavirus for updates and answers to frequently asked questions, or email COVID19@hartford.edu with questions.

Thank you,

HRD

 

 

May 13: End-of-Semester Update

Dear Parents and Families,

I hope this message finds you and your family healthy and safe. As we reach the end of the spring semester, I know many of you are concerned about what happens next. Those of you in the local area may have watched or read last week’s update provided by Governor Lamont’s education committee of the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Group, including guidance for the gradual reopening of Connecticut campuses.

I want to be very clear—the University of Hartford is doing everything possible to return to delivering a safe, in-person, and largely residential education this fall. We are eager for the return of students’ vibrant energy on campus but understand and take seriously the need to be thoughtful and flexible in our scheduling and planning. We will be implementing additional safety precautions and/or restrictions to protect the health of students, employees, and the public as we move forward. Currently, comprehensive planning teams across the University are working diligently through various fall scenarios. They are focused on academics, campus operations and safety, student life (including residential housing and dining options), staffing, and events.

Unlike the quick but necessary changes to remote education in March, we have time to develop robust plans surrounding the potential for a blended approach to learning in multiple formats, thoroughly accommodating the needs of our students, faculty, course types, and program curriculum. Similarly, we understand that students’ connections outside of the classroom—with friends, roommates, classmates, clubs and organizations, in residential rooms, dining halls, fields, and arts spaces—are all an important part of their overall UHart experience. Our student life and success teams continue to research and develop new and exciting ways for students to safely engage and interact with one another on campus and online. Hartford HealthCare, one of Connecticut’s largest health-care systems and our on-campus student health provider, is actively participating in our planning discussions and will continue to prepare the necessary staffing, tests, and equipment we need for a fall opening.

Respecting the governor’s guidance and forthcoming updates, our scenario working groups will continue their planning through June and we intend to announce our reopening measures in early July. In the coming weeks, we will begin to gradually and safely open parts of campus per the Connecticut guidelines. I will continue to communicate with you as those staggered plans move forward; I know many students are waiting on additional information about a time to collect their belongings that remain on campus.

I have expressed to our seniors my deep disappointment that their final semester at UHart had to be completed from a distance. The Class of 2020’s dedication and resilience have been inspiring and impressive to witness. Please join us as we honor our graduates virtually this Friday and at an in-person ceremony in December. Later this week, I will share additional details about an opportunity for qualifying students in the Class of 2020 to remain at the University and earn a graduate degree in select programs with significant scholarship support.

In the coming months, we have a challenge in front of us. The situation and guidelines will continue to evolve, but the University community is pulling together to take strategic and decisive action as soon as we can. The safety and educational experience of our students are top priorities as we prepare to welcome them back in the fall.

Thank you,
Greg Woodward

May 1: Refunds and Credits

Dear Students and Families,

Thank you once again for your patience as we have worked to develop appropriate responses to the disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic. We are pleased to provide information today on plans relative to room and board, and fee refunds and credits, along with other matters related to student finances.

ROOM, MEAL PLAN, AND PARKING PERMIT ADJUSTMENTS

Credits and refunds are being calculated student by student. Amounts are based on prorated costs, minus select fixed university expenses, from the period beginning March 23, the day campus operations would have resumed following spring break, and continuing through the end of the spring semester. Credits and refunds are subject to the following adjustments:

  • Financial aid applied to room and board
  • Fees paid by those students who remained on campus
  • Fees paid by the University for those students with certain on-campus job positions (RAs, RFAs)
  • Outstanding account balances

ROOM CREDITS AND REFUNDS

Room credit amounts are calculated based upon the rate applied to the housing in which the student resided as of March 23. The standard refundable credit, prior to any adjustments calculated at the individual student level as noted above, can be found on the bursar's website.

If you have already moved out of your on-campus residence but still have your room key, please mail it, along with your room number, in a padded envelope to Max Koskoff, Office of Residential Life, University of Hartford, 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford, CT, 06117. We recommend sending your key via certified mail to ensure proper delivery. If you have not yet removed your belongings, we expect to offer additional move -out opportunities after the Connecticut “Stay Safe, Stay Home” executive order has been lifted. We anticipate sharing additional details soon after May 20.

MEAL PLAN, DINING DOLLAR, AND HAWKCASH CREDITS AND REFUNDS

Meal plan credits are calculated based upon the plan in which the student participated. All meal plans consist of meal swipes and dining dollars. The portion of the meal plan related to meal swipes will generate a credit or refund similar to housing outlined above. The full remaining amount of dining dollars and Hawk cash on the student’s account as of March 23 will be used to generate the total credit or refund amount over and above the below standards. The standard refundable credit, prior to any adjustments calculated at the individual student level, related to meal swipes, can be found on the bursar's website.

PARKING PERMITS

Parking permits are required to be paid annually, and cover the time period from September through August. The cost of the parking permit depends on when the permit was purchased, and reduces by 25 percent on a quarterly basis. Parking permit refundable credits have been calculated based upon the date at which the permit was purchased and the time period covered by that permit. The standard refundable credit, prior to any adjustments calculated at the individual student level, related to parking permits can be found on the bursar's website.

CARES ACT STIMULUS FUNDING

The University anticipates receiving funds from the U.S. government’s Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. This additional funding is being provided to students for expenses related to the disruption of campus operations due to the coronavirus, such as food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care. It will be provided as a cash grant*. Using the most recently available guidance from the Department of Education, the University will be providing Title IV eligible students the following:

  • $500 to all residential students displaced from campus
  • $250 to all other full-time undergraduate students
  • Graduate students that are Title IV eligible and have experienced a hardship should apply for stimulus funding here.

Please note that as of today, CARES Act cash grants are taxable to the student and must be reported by the University at year end. It is our understanding there is potential future legislation to request grants are tax-free to the student. Also, by accepting or donating a refund or credit, you thereby release any and all potential claims related in any way to the closing of campus and transition to on-line learning due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

HOW WILL CREDITS AND REFUNDS BE PROCESSED?

Graduating seniors will receive a refund if the credit has generated a refundable balance on their account. The balance will be provided to the student through BankMobile, if the student had previously completed a BankMobile profile. If not, a check will be mailed to the student’s home address. We expect refunds to be processed by June 1.

Students who will not be graduating this semester will receive a room and meal plan credit adjustment applied to their student account. These credit adjustments may be applied to future tuition, room and board, or other fees and expenses. Credits will appear in student accounts by June 1.

OPTION TO DONATE

Several people have asked how they can help address the significant impact this crisis has created for many of our students and their families. If you wish to support students in need, we invite you to consider donating a portion or all of your refund to the Student Emergency Support Fund. Should you choose to donate, please contact Victoria Sandoval, associate director of family giving, for assistance with your tax-deductible contribution. Thank you for your consideration; we continue to be inspired by your support and generosity.

We are here to support our students in any way we can. Students with pressing financial needs, or who have experienced significant hardship as a result of the current pandemic, are asked to complete this form for assistance. A member of our Office of Student Financial Assistance will be in touch to review your account, financial aid, and options.

Thank you for your continued patience as we review and process the above credits, refunds, and hardship requests for thousands of our students. We will continue to follow and implement evolving guidance from the Department of Education and the federal government, while working as quickly as we can to automate the process and facilitate timely processing. If you have additional questions, please email covid19@hartford.edu.

Thank you,

Laura Whitney
Vice President for Finance and Operations
 

 

Messages for Specific Community Members

Below, you can view emails for specific community members. The full communication for each message is located above in chronological order. 

Students

  • October 16: Important COVID-19 Policy Update
  • October 9: Spring 2021 Remote Options
  • October 8: Celebrating a Milestone
  • September 21: Expectation Reminders
  • September 18: Testing, Isolation, and Quarantine
  • September 9: Initial Fall Semester Update
  • August 27: Student Engagement and Events
  • August 27: Important Health and Safety Reminders
  • August 19: Student Behavior Expectations
  • August 18: Testing Update and Health Screenings
  • August 12: Travel Advisory Update
  • August 11: Campus Access and Residential Life Visitors
  • August 7: Testing Requirement Update
  • August 4: Testing Requirement and Travel Restrictions
  • July 23: Testing, Move In, and More
  • July 10: Fall Opening Update
  • May 30: Fall Opening Update
  • May 21: Move-Out Information
  • May 13: End-of-Semester Update
  • May 1: Refunds and Credits
  • April 28: End-of-Semester Message to Students
  • April 9: Summerterm Moving Exclusively Online
  • April 6: New Date for Commencement
  • April 3: Campus Update
  • March 29: Move-in Plan Change
  • March 27: Move-out Plan Reminder
  • March 27: Advance Registration for Fall 2020
  • March 26: Academic and Personal Support for Graduate Students
  • March 26: Move-Out Plan and Options
  • March 23: Academic Updates for Students
  • March 21: Changes to Spring Semester
  • March 16: Critical Updates to UHart's Phased Approach
  • March 15: Updates on COVID-19 Response to Campus Community 
  • March 12: Messages from President Woodward—Phased Approach to COVID-19
  • March 12: Event Restrictions
  • March 11: Message to Campus Community & Travel Registration
  • February 28: Restrictions on Travel
  • February 27: Prevention Tips
  • January 28: Symptoms and Precautions
  • January 23: Novel Coronavirus

Faculty

  • October 19: Winter Break Scheduling for Employees
  • October 8: Celebrating a Milestone
  • September 16: Fac/Staff Accommodations for Spring 2021
  • September 9: Initial Fall Semester Update
  • August 27: Student Engagement and Events
  • August 27: Important Health and Safety Reminders
  • August 19: Student Behavior Expectations
  • August 18: Testing Update and Health Screenings
  • August 19: A Message from Provost Sweitzer - Health and Safety Precautions
  • August 17: A Message from Provost Sweitzer
  • August 4: Returning to Work
  • August 3: A Message from Provost Sweitzer
  • July 20: Returning to Work
  • July 15: Information for Faculty
  • July 8: A Message for Faculty About Remote Students
  • July 6: Faculty Development for Fall Teaching Approaches
  • June 19: Return to Work Update
  • June 16: A Message for Faculty
  • May 30: Fall Opening Update
  • May 18: Employee Schedules
  • April 9: Summerterm Moving Exclusively Online
  • April 6: Campus Access and Health Sreenings
  • April 6: New Date for Commencement
  • April 3: Campus Update
  • March 27: Advance Registration for Fall 2020
  • March 26: Message to Faculty—PT and other related issues
  • March 24: Employee Health Guidelines
  • March 23: Academic Updates for Faculty
  • March 21: Changes to the Spring Semester
  • March 20: Resources for Teaching Online
  • March 17: Campus Access
  • March 16: Critical Updates to UHart's Phased Approach
  • March 15: Updates on COVID-19 Response to Campus Community
  • March 13: Teaching Resources
  • March 12: Message from President Woodward—Phased Approach to COVID-19
  • March 12: Event Restrictions
  • March 11: Message to Campus Community & Travel Registration
  • March 10: Preparations and Travel Restrictions
  • March 6: Academic Continuity
  • January 28: Symptoms and Precautions
  • January 23: Novel Coronavirus

Staff

  • October 19: Winter Break Scheduling for Employees
  • October 8: Celebrating a Milestone
  • September 16: Fac/Staff Accommodations for Spring 2021
  • September 9: Initial Fall Semester Update
  • August 27: Student Engagement and Events
  • August 27: Important Health and Safety Reminders
  • August 19: Student Behavior Expectations
  • August 18: Testing Update and Health Screenings
  • August 4: Returning to Work
  • July 20: Returning to Work
  • June 19: Return to Work Update
  • May 30: Fall Opening Update
  • May 18: Employee Schedules
  • April 6: Campus Access and Health Screenings
  • April 6: New Date for Commencement
  • March 27: Advance Registration for Fall 2020
  • March 21: Changes to the Spring Semeste
  • March 17: Campus Access
  • March 16: Critical Updates to UHart's Phased Approach
  • March 15: Updates on COVID-19 Response to Campus Community
  • March 12: Message from President Woodward—Phased Approach to COVID-19
  • March 12: Event Restrictions
  • March 11: Message to Campus Community & Travel Registration
  • March 10: Preparations and Travel Restrictions
  • January 28: Symptoms and Precautions
  • January 23: Novel Coronavirus

Parents

  • October 16: Important COVID-19 Policy Update
  • September 21: Expectation Reminders
  • September 18: Testing, Isolation, and Quarantine
  • September 9: Initial Fall Semester Update
  • August 27: Student Engagement and Events
  • August 27: Important Health and Safety Reminders
  • August 19: Student Behavior Expectations
  • August 18: Testing Update and Health Screenings
  • August 12: Travel Advisory Update
  • August 11: Campus Access and Residential Life Policies
  • August 7: Testing Requirement Update
  • August 4: Testing Requirement and Travel Restrictions
  • July 23: Testing, Move In, and More
  • July 10: Fall Opening Update
  • May 30: Fall Opening Update
  • May 13: End-of-Semester Update
  • May 1: Refunds and Credits
  • April 6: New Date for Commencement
  • March 26: Move-out Plan and Options
  • March 21: Changes to the Spring Semester
  • March 16: Critical Updates to UHart's Phased Approach
  • March 15: Updates on COVID-19 Response to Campus Community
  • March 12: Message from President Woodward—Phased Approach to COVID-19
  • March 11: Message to Campus Community & Travel Registration
  • March 10: Preparations and Travel Restrictions
  • January 28: Symptoms and Precautions
  • January 23: Novel Coronavirus

Alumni

March 23: An update to our alumni