Graduate

Application Process

Contact the Hartt Admission Office
Office Hours: M–F,
8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.


University of Hartford
Office of Admission
200 Bloomfield Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06117
860.768.4465

harttadm@hartford.edu

Applications to The Hartt School can be made using the University of Hartford online application. Applicants will select their preferred audition/interview dates on the application, which must be submitted before an audition/interview can be scheduled.

All applicants will have an interview within their major’s department or with their audition panel. Applicants to all graduate music education programs will also complete a brief music skills assessment test on the day of their interview.

The following supporting documents must be submitted with your application or within two weeks of applying:

  • Letter of Intent
  • Performance/Professional Resume
  • Repertoire list: Required for all auditioning applicants
  • Transcripts from all higher education institutions attended
  • $90 fee ($50 application fee + $40 audition/interview fee)
  • Three letters of recommendation

Auditions

Auditions and interviews are conducted for all programs on campus as well as in select cities around the United States.

Prior Training and Degree Requirements

Applicants to Hartt graduate programs must have attained the requisite training through degree study in the same or similar field. Applicants to all master's degree and Graduate Professional Diploma (GPD) programs must provide evidence of undergraduate study and degree/diploma confirmation. Applicants for all Artist Diploma (AD) and doctoral programs (DMA, PhD), must provide evidence of study and achievement at both the bachelor's and master's level. Hartt faculty and administration reserve the right to determine whether an applicant's prior training and educational background meet the necessary standards for acceptance.

Music Education Licensure and Teaching Experience

Applicants to the Master of Music Education degree program must have completed a bachelor's degree in music education at an accredited institution. Applicants to the PhD in Music Education degree program must provide evidence of educational training and accomplishment at both the bachelor's and master's levels at an accredited institution. All applicants to Hartt graduate programs in Music Education must hold a valid teaching license. A valid copy of applicant’s teaching license must be submitted.  Hartt's Music Education Division strongly recommends that applicants have at least one year (for master's degree) and three years (for PhD) of teaching experience at an elementary or secondary, public or private school before beginning their MMEd.

Composition Score Submissions

Submit copies of no more than three samples of your work in score and/or CD form. Please note: CD-Rs in AIFF format are acceptable, but applicants should NOT send MP3 files on disc.

Scores can be submitted through dropbox. Designate harttadm@hartford.edu as the recipient.

Please note: Submitted compositions will not be returned. We only accept PDFs and audio files (no Sibelius or Finale files). Make sure all uploaded files contain your name in the file name.

Preliminary Video (Prescreening) Requirements

Preliminary Conducting Video for Orchestral/Instrumental Conducting Applicants

Instrumental/orchestral conducting applicants will submit application materials and prepare a short preliminary video (20 minute maximum), containing two or three sections of contrasting material. The position of the camera should be facing the conductor. It is recommended that the student also submit an audio recording, of approximately the same length, demonstrating additional conducting experience. If possible, a segment should be included showing the applicant conducting one movement of a substantial work. Enclosed with the video should be a cover letter indicating the applicant's intended program and major, and a written statement expressing the reasons for interest in the chosen career and major. Once the preliminary video is reviewed, applicants may be contacted with an invitation to audition in person on an arranged date.

Preliminary Teaching Video for Music Education Applicants

Music Education applicants should submit a video of their teaching by the application deadline. The video should present 30 minutes of teaching elements, concepts, or performance techniques in a classroom setting demonstrating modeling, feedback, and other effective instructional strategies. Confirmation of your interview date will follow a positive review of the preliminary teaching video.

Preliminary Conducting Video for Choral Conducting Applicants

Applicants for the Master of Music, Master of Music Education, or Doctor of Musical Arts programs in Choral Conducting will submit application materials and prepare a short preliminary video (30 minutes total), containing 15 minutes of the applicant conducting in performance as well as 15 minutes of rehearsal conducting. The camera should be positioned to be facing the conductor during a performance and appropriately placed at the rehearsal to show clearly the conductor as well as some view of the group if possible. It is recommended that the student also submit an additional unedited audio recording of approximately the same length as the video. The recording should demonstrate additional conducting experience in a variety of styles and/or situations. Once the preliminary video is reviewed, applicants may be contacted with an invitation to audition in person on a date to be arranged.

Prescreening Requirement for Doctor of Musical Arts and Artist Diploma Applicants

Doctor of Musical Arts and Artist Diploma applicants in performance must submit with their completed application a preliminary recording electronically, via Youtube or Dropbox, on or before the application deadline. All recordings must contain music of contrasting styles and periods within a time frame of 20 to 30 minutes maximum. Confirmation of your audition date will follow a positive review of the preliminary audition recording. DMA and AD prescreen recordings must contain elements of the audition requirements, but do not need to be the same pieces performed at the live audition.

Research Paper Submissions

As part of the application process, all DMA, PhD, and graduate Music History and Music Theory applicants must submit a research paper on a topic in the field of music history, music theory, or music education. This requirement allows faculty to determine an applicant's scholarly ability to successfully meet master's and doctoral thesis requirements.
MASTER OF MUSIC - MUSIC THEORY
Applicants are to submit two research papers. Both papers must be on music, one of which must be an analysis paper. Please note: Submitted research papers will not be returned.

Music History Research Paper Submission

The research paper must meet specific standards and guidelines, so it is important for the applicant to observe the following criteria:

  1. The paper must have a title page giving the name of the student, the title of the paper, and the date of completion. If the paper was written as partial fulfillment of a course requirement, give the name of the course.
  2. LENGTH: The paper must be generated by word processor and must be a minimum of 10 pages of double-spaced text, exclusive of musical examples and bibliography.
  3. FOOTNOTES: Footnotes must be included and must be in MLA (Modern Language Association) or academic format, consecutively numbered, and placed at the bottom of the page. APA (American Psychological Association) style is not acceptable for papers in music history.
  4. BIBLIOGRAPHY: The bibliography may cite books, editions, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and periodical literature, and may also include references to recordings, interviews, websites, etc. Papers which have been written with reference to websites only are not acceptable. If a website is among your sources, give its official name, the URL (website address), and the date consulted. Unrefereed sites such as Wikipedia are not acceptable sources of information.
  5. All pages must be numbered
  6. The paper must demonstrate evidence of original analysis, synthesis, or interpretation. A summary of the history of an instrument, for example, or a review of a composer or performer biography is not appropriate. Writings on such topics will not meet the guidelines of the submitted research paper requirement.
  7. A paper which analyzes musical style or makes frequent references to musical passages must include appropriate musical examples. These must be numbered and cited in complete for, e.g. “Ex. 2, Beethoven, Sonata in B-Flat, op. 106, I, mm. 35-38.” Citations to musical examples should be placed at the bottom of the page that contains the example.

Suitable writing in formal papers is termed academic style. It is objective, unbiased, specific, and supported by evidence. Speculation, when supported by fact and logic, can prove interesting as part of an historical paper and may be included. Use proper grammar, correct spelling, and punctuation. Avoid the use of coined words and colloquialisms.

The purpose of the research paper application requirement is to provide evidence of a student’s ability to conduct research and present findings in written form. The subject of the paper must be related to an established, historical topic with a substantial literature. Additionally, the paper should be written in such a way that is understandable to an audience beyond those intimately associated with the topic area. It is not the purpose of a research paper to impart to the reader one’s musical preferences or personal tastes.

A research paper may take any of several forms. It may be:

  • interpretive (“What’s so Funny about Mozart’s ‘Musical Joke’?”)
  • comparative (“Settings of Goethe’s ‘Kennst du das Land’ by Schubert, Schumann, and Wolf”)
  • analytical (“Fugal Writing in Brahms’s Ein deutsches Requiem”)
  • musico-technological (“The Keyed Bugle and Haydn’s Concerto”)
  • socio-musicological (“Nadia Boulanger, Germaine Tailleferre, and Women in French Musical Society”)
  • a musical genre (“Samuel Barber and the Orchestral ‘Essay’”)
  • a musical activity (“The Brass Band in American Life from the Civil War to Sousa”)
  • an individual publication (“Music in the Bay Psalm Book”)

The paper should not deal exclusively with the sociology of music, e.g. “The Politics of Popular Music in South Africa in the 1990s.”

Note: A study on a jazz-related subject will be considered if it demonstrates comparable research skills, exhibits independent synthesis of ideas, and is neither solely biographical nor derived from secondary accounts (e.g. “Duke Ellington’s Rockin’ in Rhythm – The Evolution of a Jazz Masterpiece”).

Music Theory Research Paper Submission

Students who submit a music theory analytical paper must meet specific standards and guidelines. It is important for the applicant to observe the following criteria for writing and submitting a music theory analytical paper.

  • The purpose of the music academic paper application requirement at The Hartt School is to provide evidence of the student’s ability to organize and present musical findings and observations in an acceptable, comprehensible written format.
  • Writing about Music: An Introductory Guide by Richard J. Wingell, 4th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2009 is suggested for reference. This widely-used guide is a concise book providing detailed information for the organization and writing of music academic papers. For the preparation and use of either footnotes or endnotes and a bibliography in a music academic paper, students are encouraged to consult and follow the information given in A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations by K. Turabian, W. Booth, G. Colomb, J. Williams; 8th edition, University of Chicago Press, 2013.
  • The subject of a music theory analytical paper must be related to an established analytical procedure (e.g., formal analysis, linear-reductive analysis, pitch-class set-theory analysis) and should be an analysis of music from the general classical repertoire. An analytical paper on a non- classical-related subject will be considered if it clearly demonstrates comparable analytical skills and exhibits independent synthesis of ideas. An analytical paper should be written in such a way that it is understandable to readers beyond those immediately associated with the topic area. It is not the purpose of an academic analytical paper to impart to the reader one’s idiosyncratic musical preferences, tastes, or biases.
  • Suitable writing in formal papers is termed academic style. Academic style is objective, unbiased, specific, and is supported by evidence. Speculation, when supported by fact and logic, can be an interesting component within an analytical paper and may be included. The analytical paper, nevertheless, must use proper grammar, correct spelling, and punctuation. The use of coined words, colloquialisms, and artificial terminology are to be avoided.
  • The analytical paper must have a title page giving the name of the student, the title of the paper, and the date of completion. If the paper was written as partial fulfillment of a course requirement, the name of the course, school, and instructor must be indicated. Papers submitted with or without the instructor's corrections are acceptable
  • The paper should be of sufficient length to present the purpose, observations, and conclusions of the analysis. All pages must be appropriately numbered. All text of the paper must be generated by word processor using appropriate margins, spacing, and font.
  • An analytical paper does not require footnotes or endnotes and a bibliography. However, if footnotes or endnotes are used, they must be in an acceptable academic format and must be consecutively numbered, and placed at the bottom of the page as footnotes or at the end of the paper as endnotes (see 2. above). Likewise, if a bibliography is included, it must be in an acceptable academic format and must clearly indicate books, editions, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and periodical literature, and may include references to recordings, interviews, and websites (also see 2. above).

The paper must clearly demonstrate evidence of original analysis, synthesis, or interpretation. Papers directly or indirectly exhibiting plagiarism will be rejected. The paper must make frequent references to musical passages and must include appropriate musical examples or a musical score. Musical examples must be clearly prepared, numbered, and cited.

Revised 03-23-2016

Entrance and Placement Testing

Placement Exams

All new, incoming graduate students will take placement exams during the week of orientation to determine the appropriate course of study and whether subject review courses are necessary.

All Master of Music Education applicants will complete the Music Aptitude Profile (MAP) test. This test measures innate rhythmic and melodic ability and potential for cognitive growth. 

Doctoral Proficiency Testing

Doctor of Musical Arts and Doctor of Philosophy applicants will take the music theory and music history essay tests prior to decision on their application.  These essays will be given the same time as the audition. To aid in preparation, The DMA Essay Exam study guide is available as well as additional guidelines and instructions for Music Theory.

Note: All DMA applicants are allowed only two attempts at passing the academic entrance testing component. Entrance testing cannot be attempted twice during the same admissions cycle.  

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