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Accreditation

Department of Education

The University of Hartford's teacher education program has a long history of national and state accreditation and program approval. At the national level, we are currently accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) which merged with the other major national accreditation organization to form Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). NCATE/CAEP has been the leading accrediting agency for the preparation of education professionals and the accreditation of more than 630 colleges of education.

Read more about CAEP accreditation here.

CAEP 8 Annual Reporting Measures

The Department of Education worked with a pool of alumni who implemented an action research study to collect data on teacher impact on student learning. Data were collected using a pretest-intervention - posttest design with progress monitoring probes.  Fifteen alumni were invited to participate in this study.  We had four (N=4) alumni respond and agree to participate.

Below are the results of two studies the department conducted on our alumni impact on student learning.

Three (N=3) of our alumni used the Fountas and Pinnell assessment for pre- and post-test assessment of their students.  Five of 37 students tracked over a 4-to-6-month period remained at level. The rest increased by one level.

One (N=1) alumni used numerical percentages. All students (N=13) tracked had an increase in pre-assessment math level over a 4-week period. 

Feedback from these data will be used by the Department to evaluate current programs and to identify program strengths to build on and weaknesses to improve on. 

Due to COVID, the department was unable to collect more data in time to meet the CAEP annual deadline.  Our alumni teachers are overwhelmed with the daily changes and challenges COVID has had on education this past academic year.

The department requested 15 alumni who are currently teachers to have their students complete our teaching effectiveness survey.  We received responses from four alumni.  From those four responses we had twenty-three elementary school students participate in the survey. The students surveyed ranged from kindergarten to third grade.  Because of the age group we kept the response choices simple yes = “agree” and no = “not agree.”  Of the twenty-three students all but 11 responded with yes “agree” to the following questions:

  1. I like coming to school.
  2. I like to learn new things at school.
  3. My teacher helps me understand my work.
  4. My teacher cares about me.
  5. I feel safe in my classroom.
  6. I like to learn from my teacher.
  7. My teacher really knows me as a person; understands me.
  8. I feel connected to my teacher.
  9. I am taught skills on how to manage my stress.
  10. My teacher teaches me in a way I can learn.
  11. I enjoy learning in my classroom.
  12. My teacher helps me when I don't understand.

We use these data to evaluate current programs to identify program strengths to build on and weaknesses to improve on.

Due to COVID, the Department was unable to collect more data in time to meet the CAEP annual deadline.  Our alumni teachers are overwhelmed with the daily changes and challenges COVID has had on education this past academic year.

To gauge overall satisfaction of employers, the Department of Education sent out a survey to our partner school principals who have hired our completers. Data from this survey will be used to determine the department’s overall effectiveness in preparing teacher candidates to become successful in-service teachers. Data will be analyzed, and adjustments will be made to the overall program or an individual program based on these data. 

We had a 50% response rate to the employer survey.  Using a rating scale of 1 to 4 we asked the employers the following questions:   

Question Percent of Respondents
On a scale of 1-4 with 1 equating to “Ineffective Teacher” and 4 equating to “Teacher Leader” rate the employee’s efficacy 60% responded with “Teacher Leader: Models and collaborates to improve the classroom and beyond on this indicator.”
The teacher implements developmentally appropriate instruction that accounts for learners’ strengths, interests and needs. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher assesses student readiness for learning and expand on individual students’ prior knowledge. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher demonstrates thorough knowledge that learners are individuals with differences in their backgrounds as well as their approaches to learning and performance. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher exhibits respect and high expectations for each learner; communicates with diverse learners in a fair and respectful manner; and consistently provides equitable opportunities to meet the diverse needs of learners. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher collaborates with learners to facilitate self-reflection and ownership for ongoing improvement of the classroom community. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher develops highly engaging learning environment, taking into account student differences and learning needs. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher guides learners in using technologies in appropriate, safe, and effective ways. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher displays mastery of content knowledge and learning progressions that allow flexible adjustments to address needs of all learners. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher creates an interactive environment where learners take the initiative to master content and engage in meaningful learning experiences to master the content. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher designs learning experiences that integrate culturally relevant content to build on learners’ cultural backgrounds and experiences. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher uses self-reflection to improve teaching effectiveness. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher articulates thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts to inform, instruct, and motivate during instruction. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher differentiates instruction in the areas of content, process, product, or learning environment to meet the needs of all students. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher uses technology appropriately to engage learners and enhance instruction. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher integrates a variety of instructional approaches to engage students. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”
The teacher proactively addresses student learning needs through ongoing collaboration with other teachers, and/or specialists. 80% responded with either “agree” or “strongly agree”

We also invited our partners (principals, superintendents, and assistant superintendents) from districts that have hired our alumni to attend a focus group session. Discussions in this session focused on getting feedback about our teacher preparation programs to allow us to engage in continuous improvement to better prepare pre-service teachers to face the current challenges in teacher education. 

The Department of Education sent out a survey to all alumni who graduated in 2020 (N = 57) and asked them a series of questions on their overall impression (positive or negative) and satisfaction of our professional program. We received 2 responses from the class of 2020. 

The survey included a series of questions with a numerical number between 1 and 5, with five being the highest and 1 being the lowest rating for the answer.  Below is the average response to our questions by alumni.

Question Answer
I feel prepared to design and implement developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences. 4
I feel prepared to create inclusive learning environments. 5
I feel prepared to create learning experiences that assure mastery of the content. 5
I feel prepared to communicate with colleagues, and school professionals to ensure learner growth and advance the profession 4.5
I am able to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners. 4
I feel prepared to use multiple methods of assessment to monitor and evaluate progress. 4.5
I feel prepared to collaborate effectively with colleagues and school professionals to ensure learner growth and advance the profession. 5
I feel prepared to utilize technology, as needed, to improve instruction and advance student learning. 3.5
I feel prepared to handle change in instructional methods due to unforeseen circumstances (i.e., COVID and Remote Learning 4.5

The Department will use this information to make adjustments to areas of the program that ranked low in the survey and reinforce those areas in the program that ranked high.

Due to COVID, the department was unable to collect more data in time to meet the CAEP annual deadline.  Our alumni teachers are overwhelmed with the daily changes and challenges COVID has had on education this past academic year.

The data below represent the current graduation rates for each education cohort between a 3-7½ year period.

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These data measure the success of our student completers in obtaining their teacher licenses.  Table 1 includes data on the institutional pass rate (the percentage of students taking and passing the State of Connecticut’s teacher exams) and shows a positive trend each year. Last year (2019-2020) the University of Hartford’s institutional pass rate exceeded the statewide average pass rate.

The second table measures the number of completers (students who successfully completed a teacher education program). Results from last three years indicate a positive trend; however, this past year the number of completers is down.  We believe this may be due to the financial effects on students from COVID.  Both tables show the University of Hartford Department of Education is preparing more students in the teacher education program and preparing more students to successfully pass the state exams for certification.

ETS Completer Pass Rates

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University of Hartford Completers of Initial & Advanced Preparation Programs

2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Initial 50 57 64 56
Advanced 0 0 0 1
Total 50 57 64 57

 

Download Title II Report 2021

An alumni focus group session was conducted to measure the ability of our completers to be hired in positions for which they were prepared. At this focus group we asked our alumni a series of questions, one of which was about the area in which they were hired. Data from this focus group will be used by the Department to determine if we (as the EPP) are preparing candidates with meaningful and enough work experiences prior to graduation to be successful in their area of certification post-graduation. Also, these data will show how well the Department has provided students with networking opportunities to help them obtain teaching positions.     

Focus group pool:

  • Graduating Class of 2020 (N = 57)
  • Response to survey 2

Of the 57 students who participated, two responded to the survey saying they obtained employment in their area of certification.  The State is working to compile data on completers hired in their area of study.  Next year we hope to have access to these data to have a more accurate percentage for measure 7. 

Due to COVID, the department was unable to collect more data in time to meet the CAEP annual deadline.  Our alumni teachers are overwhelmed with the daily changes and challenges COVID has had on education this past academic year.

This information is compiled by the University’s financial aid department with data from the U.S. Department of Education. Below is the default rate our students have on their loans, which shows their ability to pay back student loans given their current income.   Data from this metric can be used to see how the University of Hartford’s cost of attendance compares relative to other universities’ costs of attendance given current income trends in the field of education.

The University of Hartford's default rate is 5.2.